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I have two tables. Forms has ~77000 rows. Logs has ~2.7 million rows.

The following query returns "30198" in less than a second:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT logs.DOCID) FROM logs, forms WHERE logs.DOCID = forms.DOCID;

And this query has been running for ~15 minutes so far, and still hasn't finished:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT logs.DOCID) FROM logs, forms WHERE logs.DOCID <> forms.DOCID;

Why is the "not equal" query so much slower?

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What about WHERE NOT logs.DOCID = forms.DOCID? –  user142019 Sep 14 '11 at 15:53
1  
Are you trying to find logs.DOCID values for which no corresponding value exists in forms? If so try SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (SELECT DOCID FROM logs EXCEPT SELECT DOCID FROM forms ) T –  Martin Smith Sep 14 '11 at 15:58
    
@Martin - your query returned in 8 seconds. Thanks! –  Tom Redman Sep 14 '11 at 16:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Because = reduces the join operation to one single matching row from each table (presuming those docids are unique).

Think of it this way- you've got a dance with 5 boys and 5 girls:

Adam      Alice
Bob       Betty
Charly    Cathy
Dick      Deb
Evan      Elly

You pair them up by first letter. So

Adam->Alice
Bob->Betty
etc...

One single pairing

But if you pair them up by "First letters do NOT match", you end up with:

Adam->Betty
Adam->Cathy
Adam->Deb
Adam->Elly
Bob->Alice
etc...

you've MASSIVELY increased the number of pairings. This is why your <> query is taking so long. You're essentially trying to fetch m x n rows, rather than just min(m,n). With this data, you end up with 25 rows, rather than 5. For your specified table sizes, you're working with 77,000 * 2,700,000 = 207.9 billion rows, minus 77,000 where the two ids match up, for a total of 207,899,923,000 rows in the joined data set.


given your query requirements, try a left join and look for null right-side records:

SELECT DISTINCT logs.DOCID
FROM logs
LEFT JOIN forms ON logs.DOCID = forms.DOCID
WHERE forms.DOCID IS NULL
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2  
+1 I'm guessing the OP probably needs NOT IN or NOT EXISTS or EXCEPT –  Martin Smith Sep 14 '11 at 15:57
1  
@Tredman - use EXISTS or IN for this check –  JNK Sep 14 '11 at 15:59
1  
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (SELECT DOCID FROM logs EXCEPT SELECT DOCID FROM forms ) T –  Martin Smith Sep 14 '11 at 16:00
1  
Thanks all. This helps me understand SQL a bit better. SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT logs.DOCID) FROM logs, formId WHERE logs.DOCID NOT IN (SELECT forms.DOCID FROM forms); returned in 11 seconds. @Martin Smith - SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (SELECT DOCID FROM logs EXCEPT SELECT DOCID FROM forms) T; returned in 8 seconds. –  Tom Redman Sep 14 '11 at 16:09
1  
@TRedman a suggestion, even though you will likely go with Martin's EXCEPT suggestion - don't use NOT IN unless you are absolutely 100% certain the column on the inside cannot be NULL. NOT EXISTS is usually preferable over NOT IN. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 14 '11 at 16:13

Two reasons:

  • queries for equivalence can generally use indexes (if available), while query for nonequivalence cannot

  • <> returns so much more data.

Your query with <> is bogus. What should it return?

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Thanks for the response. It should return ~3800. I'm looking for any formIDs in the logs table that don't correspond to formIDs in the forms table. Somebody else has answered above - I should be using EXISTS or IN. –  Tom Redman Sep 14 '11 at 16:02
1  
Yes. Another possibility would be RIGHT OUTER JOIN with IS NULL. –  jpalecek Sep 14 '11 at 16:19

This is totally dependant on the distribution of values in the table. If the column you are searching, for example had the same value (= forms.DOCID) for 99.99 % of the rows and only one row with a different value, you would see exactly the opposite behavior.

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