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Our application can get following numbers:

0.1
0.02
0.003

etc.

These values treated by our code as BigDecimal,as far we operate with money.

There is form on web UI, where user should view these floating parts of prices, transformed to following ones:

1
02
003

The question is,how to trim leading zero and delimiter character in input prices. Perhaps BigDecimal class has standard method something like trimLeadingZeroes(),but can't find any.

UPDATE: trim just leading zero and delimiter symbol

For instance:

1 is 0.1

27 is 0.27
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I'm not sure I understand the requirements. In displaying these numbers, what's the difference between 0.02 and 0.0002? –  Aleks G Sep 14 '11 at 16:07
2  
So you want to treat 0.1, 0.01 and 0.001 as if they were the same? –  Jon Skeet Sep 14 '11 at 16:07
1  
these aren't really leading zeroes.. they convey meaning. –  Randy Sep 14 '11 at 16:08
    
Will there always be a single non-zero digit, or is 0.023 a possibility? –  dlev Sep 14 '11 at 16:11
    
Sorry for mistake, I've updated post –  sergionni Sep 14 '11 at 16:12

9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+25

Something like this?

public String getDecimalFractions(BigDecimal value) {
    String strValue = value.toPlainString();
    int index = strValue.indexOf(".");
    if(index != -1) {
        return strValue.substring(index+1, strValue.length());
    } 
    return "0"; 
}
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Have you tried calling BigDecimal.unscaledValue? The downside is that 0.13 would then be 13 whereas you possibly want 1.3... it's slightly hard to tell. If you could give more examples, that would really help.

(That approach would also fail if the value were 1000 to start with - you'd end up with 1...)

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never tried,do you mean BigInteger?thnak you for help –  sergionni Sep 14 '11 at 16:21
    
using unscaledValue() has the following issues: 0.01 -> 1 and 1.01 -> 101 –  Gevorg Sep 20 '11 at 1:51
    
@sergionni: No, I meant BigDecimal.unscaledValue, as linked. –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '11 at 5:19
1  
@Gevorg: Yes, it's unfortunate that we basically don't have enough information about what various values should become... –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '11 at 5:21

Could it be something as simple as doing this:

public static BigDecimal fix(String str){
    return  new BigDecimal("0." + str);
}

so if you make

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(fix("1"));
    System.out.println(fix("02"));
    System.out.println(fix("003"));
}

It will print

0.1
0.02
0.003
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when ever you have to deal with splitting something its a good bet Strings can be used for it.

You first just convert the bigdecimal into a string

String s=bd.toPlainString();

Then you simply split it as so

String s2=s.split("\\.")[1];

now String s2 contains the numbers after the delimiter

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Conversion from BigDecimal to String:

    import java.math.BigDecimal;
    public class XXX {
        public static void main(String[] args){
            doIt("123");
            doIt("123.1");
            doIt("123.01");
            doIt("123.0123");
            doIt("123.00123");
        }
        static void doIt(String input){
            BigDecimal bdIn = new BigDecimal(input);
            System.out.println(bdIn+" -> "+convert(bdIn));
        }
        static String convert(BigDecimal bdIn) {
            BigDecimal bdOut = bdIn.subtract(bdIn.setScale(0, BigDecimal.ROUND_DOWN));
            return bdOut.signum() == 0 ? "0" : bdOut.toPlainString().substring(2);
        }
    }

Results are:

    123 -> 0
    123.1 -> 1
    123.01 -> 01
    123.0123 -> 0123
    123.00123 -> 00123

The code works directly with any number and takes into account only the fractional part. It also handles "0.0" gracefully.

Is this the conversion you wanted?

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Here is another simple way of doing this - assuming your input is 1.023456

        BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal("1.023456");
        BigInteger bi = bd.toBigInteger();
        BigDecimal bd2 = bd.subtract(new BigDecimal(bi));
        String afterDecimalPoint = bd2.scale() > 0 ?
               bd2.toString().substring(2) : "";

This will give the exact result as you were looking for in bd3, i.e. it'll be 023456 for the above example.

It'll work ok for whole numbers too, due to the condition in last line, i.e. 1 will return ""

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You could use the string representation of value (a BigDecimal) and StringUtils.substringAfter to do this:

StringUtils.substringAfter(value.toPlainString(), ".")
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How about writing an extension method to extend this type. Simple method might multiply number until > 1

public int  trimLeadingZeroes(bigint num) {
    while (num < 1)
    {
       num = num * 10;
    }
       return num;
    }
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import java.math.BigDecimal;
import java.math.RoundingMode;


public class RemoveZeroes {

    static final int SCALE = 10;    // decimal range 0.1 ... 0.0000000001
    static final String PADDING = "0000000000"; // SCALE number of zeroes

    public static void main(String [] arg) {

        BigDecimal [] testArray = {
            new BigDecimal(0.27),
            new BigDecimal(0.1),
            new BigDecimal(0.02),
            new BigDecimal(0.003),
            new BigDecimal(0.0000000001),
        };

        for (int i = 0; i < testArray.length; i++) {
            // normalize to the same scale
            BigDecimal b = testArray[i].setScale(SCALE, RoundingMode.FLOOR);
            // pad on the left with SCALE number of zeroes
            String step1 = PADDING + b.unscaledValue().toString();
            // remove extra zeroes from the left
            String step2 = step1.substring(step1.length() - SCALE);
            // remove extra zeroes from the right
            String step3 = step2.replaceAll("0+$", "");
            // print result
            System.out.println(step3);
        }

    }
}
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