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I just analyzed my iPhone project, and was very confused by the result XCode(4) gave me. For example, in one of my view controllers I have this code:

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSArray* menuItems;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSArray* menuItemsOptions;

- (void)viewDidLoad 
{
   [super viewDidLoad];

   self.menuItems = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:
                    NSLocalizedString(@"Foo", nil), 
                    NSLocalizedString(@"Bar", nil), 
                    nil];

  [self.menuItems release];

  self.menuItemsOptions = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:
                           NSLocalizedString(@"More foo", nil), 
                           NSLocalizedString(@"more bar", nil), 
                           nil];

  [self.menuItemsOptions release];
...
}

menuItems as well as menuItemsOptionsare properties with the retainoption. If I press analyze, XCode will show an error for the line [self.menuItems release];:

http://i54.tinypic.com/2rqkfaf.png

To confuse me even more, XCode will not show errors for the line [self.menuItemsOptions release];

Similar situation in another method:

http://i55.tinypic.com/10hof9c.png

theSelectedBegin and theSelectedEnd are again properties with retain option.

The reason why I'm posting this is that my app will actually crash with a very cryptic/not understandable backtrace within a third party library unless I add the copy seen on the last picture but dont add the release. Adding the releaseor omitting the copy will make the app crash again, this is why i decided to run the analyzer.

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
Can you post the header code where you define the properties? – edc1591 Sep 14 '11 at 16:18
    
Assuming the property declarations / implementations are correct, it sounds like something else goes very wrong. Keep in mind that the analyzer can be wrong sometimes. – Georg Fritzsche Sep 14 '11 at 16:24
    
By the way, the analyzer results would make sense if the properties were (accidentally?) copy. – Georg Fritzsche Sep 14 '11 at 16:32
    
Without seeing your property definitions or more code, I can't give a good answer. Your code above looks fine. – Sam Sep 14 '11 at 16:36

Try changing someMethod to:

-(void) someMethod:(NSDate*)fromDate toDate:(NSDate*)toDate
{
   if (editBegin)
   {
      NSDate *copiedDate = [fromDate copy];
      self.theSelectedBegin = copiedDate;
      [copiedDate release];
   }
   else
   {
      NSDate *copiedDate = [fromDate copy];
      self.theSelectedEnd = copiedDate;
      [copiedDate release];
   }
}

If you are using copy for the properties theSelectedBegin and theSelectedEnd (which I recommend), like:

@property (nonatomic, copy) NSDate *theSelectedBegin;
@property (nonatomic, copy) NSDate *theSelectedEnd;

The following code is equivalent to the above, but more concise and clean.

-(void) someMethod:(NSDate*)fromDate toDate:(NSDate*)toDate
{
   if (editBegin)
   {
      self.theSelectedBegin = fromDate;
   }
   else
   {
      self.theSelectedEnd = fromDate;
   }
}

When you do[myObj copy] a new object is returned. Doing [myObj retain] returns the SAME object with an increased retain count. So effectively, the following is BAD code:

@property (nonatomic, copy) NSDate *myDate;
[...]

self.myDate = [someDate copy];
[self.myDate release];

Breaking it down looks more like...

@property (nonatomic, copy) NSDate *myDate;
[...]

NSDate *copyDate = [someDate copy];  // never gets released
self.myDate = copyDate;             // good so far for self.myDate
[self.myDate release];              // just released self.myDate (note: copyDate not released)
share|improve this answer

The reason you're getting a warning from the analyzer is that a getter method is not required to actually return the exact same object as what you passed in to the setter. For example, imagine the following code:

- (void)doSomethingWithAString:(NSString *)aString {
    self.myName = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%@ the Great", aString];
    [self.myName release];
}

The string is created with an owning method (-init...), so you own it. Then you gave it to the myName property, which took ownership. Now you need to release the ownership you received from the -init... method, which is done by calling -release. Great.

The problem with the above code is that [self.myName release] might not release the same object you passed in to the setter. Imagine if the setter were implemented like this:

- (void)setMyName:(NSString *)someString {
    // Make sure to trim whitespace from my name!
    NSCharacterSet *whitespaceSet = [NSCharacterSet whitespaceCharacterSet];
    NSString *strippedString = [someString stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:whitespaceCharacterSet];

    [myName autorelease];
    myName = [strippedString retain];
}

Note that the object you passed into the setter is not the object that was stored to the backing ivar. When you call [self.myName release], you're releasing the stripped string, not your original string. The original string was now leaked, and the stripped string has been over-released.

In short, never assume that a getter returns the same object you passed to the setter.

share|improve this answer
    
talking about your custom setter, i think you are right. but in my case im using a standard (retain-)property, whose setter should hopefully hold and retain the very same object i pass to it. otherwise properties (especially with retain option) seem pretty useless to me. – user944943 Sep 15 '11 at 12:49
    
True; you'd think that a property tagged as "retain" would be safe. But the setter might still be doing some validation, setting it to 'nil' if the passed object was invalid for some reason. The compiler can't guarantee that the setter and getter will work exactly as the synthesized versions—if nothing else, a subclass could have overridden the methods. Anyway, that's why the analyzer is warning you. Feel free to file a bug with Apple if you feel like it's being dumb in this particular case. – BJ Homer Sep 15 '11 at 13:03

One of the appealing features of properties is that the property accessors take care of retaining and releasing the objects they point to. I can't think of a case where one would explicitly retain or release a property.

share|improve this answer
    
In the case where you assign a retain property an object that you already own. – Georg Fritzsche Sep 14 '11 at 16:31
    
What you say is true if the assignment is to an autoreleased object or a local variable that you manage separate from the property. So, self.myArray = [NSMutableArray array]; is OK. However, self.myArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init]; requires [self.myArray release] to balance the retain count. – Sam Sep 14 '11 at 16:33
    
See my comment on typeoneerror's answer. The property you assign on one line may not point to the same object you release on the next line. It's not even just a threading issue; if the semantics for the property are changed from retain to copy, you'll leak now and crash later. And, of course, setters can be overridden in subclasses, potentially causing similar issues. – Caleb Sep 14 '11 at 16:42

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