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I want to create a simple image viewer in WPF that will enable the user to:

  • Pan (by mouse dragging the image).
  • Zoom (with a slider).
  • Show overlays (rectangle selection for example).
  • Show original image (with scroll bars if needed).

Can you explain how to do it?

I didn't find a good sample on the web. Should I use ViewBox? Or ImageBrush? Do I need ScrollViewer?

Thanks!

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13 Answers 13

up vote 62 down vote accepted

The way I solved this problem was to place the image within a Border with it's ClipToBounds property set to True. The RenderTransformOrigin on the image is then set to 0.5,0.5 so the image will start zooming on the center of the image. The RenderTransform is also set to a TransformGroup containing a ScaleTransform and a TranslateTransform.

I then handled the MouseWheel event on the image to implement zooming

private void image_MouseWheel(object sender, MouseWheelEventArgs e)
{
    var st = (ScaleTransform)image.RenderTransform;
    double zoom = e.Delta > 0 ? .2 : -.2;
    st.ScaleX += zoom;
    st.ScaleY += zoom;
}

To handle the panning the first thing I did was to handle the MouseLeftButtonDown event on the image, to capture the mouse and to record it's location, I also store the current value of the TranslateTransform, this what is updated to implement panning.

Point start;
Point origin;
private void image_MouseLeftButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
{
    image.CaptureMouse();
    var tt = (TranslateTransform)((TransformGroup)image.RenderTransform)
        .Children.First(tr => tr is TranslateTransform);
    start = e.GetPosition(border);
    origin = new Point(tt.X, tt.Y);
}

Then I handled the MouseMove event to update the TranslateTransform.

private void image_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{
    if (image.IsMouseCaptured)
    {
        var tt = (TranslateTransform)((TransformGroup)image.RenderTransform)
            .Children.First(tr => tr is TranslateTransform);
        Vector v = start - e.GetPosition(border);
        tt.X = origin.X - v.X;
        tt.Y = origin.Y - v.Y;
    }
}

Finally don't forget to release the mouse capture.

private void image_MouseLeftButtonUp(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
{
    image.ReleaseMouseCapture();
}

As for the selection handles for resizing this can be accomplished using an adorner, check out this article for more information.

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1  
+1 for thoroughness. –  Stimul8d Nov 5 '09 at 12:46
7  
One observation though, calling CaptureMouse in image_MouseLeftButtonDown will result in a call to image_MouseMove where origin is not initialized yet - in the above code, it will be zero by pure chance, but if the origin is other than (0,0), the image will experience a short jump. Therefore, i think it's better to call image.CaptureMouse() at the end of the image_MouseLeftButtonDown to fix this issue. –  Andrei Pana Nov 30 '10 at 16:42
1  
Two Things. 1) There is a bug with image_MouseWheel, you have to get the ScaleTransform in a similar manner you get TranslateTransform. That is, Cast it to a TransformGroup then select and cast the appropriate Child. 2) If your movement is Jittery remember that you can't use the image to get your mouse position (since its dynamic), you have to use something static. In this example, a border is used. –  Dave Aug 27 '11 at 20:12
    
You should consider layouttransform instead of rendertransform. –  VoteCoffee Aug 5 at 19:31

The answer was posted above but wasn't complete. here is the completed version:

XAML

<Window
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
x:Class="MapTest.Window1"
x:Name="Window"
Title="Window1"
Width="1950" Height="1546" xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" xmlns:Controls="clr-namespace:WPFExtensions.Controls;assembly=WPFExtensions" mc:Ignorable="d" Background="#FF000000">

<Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot">
    <Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <RowDefinition Height="52.92"/>
        <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
    </Grid.RowDefinitions>

    <Border Grid.Row="1" Name="border">
        <Image Name="image" Source="map3-2.png" Opacity="1" RenderTransformOrigin="0.5,0.5"  />
    </Border>

</Grid>

Code Behind

using System.Linq;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Input;
using System.Windows.Media;

namespace MapTest
{
    public partial class Window1 : Window
    {
        private Point origin;
        private Point start;

        public Window1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            TransformGroup group = new TransformGroup();

            ScaleTransform xform = new ScaleTransform();
            group.Children.Add(xform);

            TranslateTransform tt = new TranslateTransform();
            group.Children.Add(tt);

            image.RenderTransform = group;

            image.MouseWheel += image_MouseWheel;
            image.MouseLeftButtonDown += image_MouseLeftButtonDown;
            image.MouseLeftButtonUp += image_MouseLeftButtonUp;
            image.MouseMove += image_MouseMove;
        }

        private void image_MouseLeftButtonUp(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
        {
            image.ReleaseMouseCapture();
        }

        private void image_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            if (!image.IsMouseCaptured) return;

            var tt = (TranslateTransform) ((TransformGroup) image.RenderTransform).Children.First(tr => tr is TranslateTransform);
            Vector v = start - e.GetPosition(border);
            tt.X = origin.X - v.X;
            tt.Y = origin.Y - v.Y;
        }

        private void image_MouseLeftButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
        {
            image.CaptureMouse();
            var tt = (TranslateTransform) ((TransformGroup) image.RenderTransform).Children.First(tr => tr is TranslateTransform);
            start = e.GetPosition(border);
            origin = new Point(tt.X, tt.Y);
        }

        private void image_MouseWheel(object sender, MouseWheelEventArgs e)
        {
            TransformGroup transformGroup = (TransformGroup) image.RenderTransform;
            ScaleTransform transform = (ScaleTransform) transformGroup.Children[0];

            double zoom = e.Delta > 0 ? .2 : -.2;
            transform.ScaleX += zoom;
            transform.ScaleY += zoom;
        }
    }
}

I have an example of a full wpf project using this code on my website: Jot the sticky note app.

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1  
Any suggestions on how to make this usable in Silverlight 3? I have problems with Vector and subtracting one Point from another... Thanks. –  Number8 Feb 1 '10 at 19:13
    
+1 Nice work Kelly. That worked perfectly. Thanks. –  David HAust Jul 29 '10 at 4:57
    
@Number8 Posted an implementation that works in Silverlight 3 for you below :) –  Henry C Aug 23 '10 at 7:06
4  
a small drawback - the image grows with the border, and not inside the border –  itsho Jan 11 '12 at 18:09
    
can you guys suggest something how to implement the same thing in windows 8 metro style app..im working on c#,xaml on windows8 –  raj May 7 '13 at 13:35

After using samples from this question I've made complete version of pan & zoom app with proper zooming relative to mouse pointer. All pan & zoom code has been moved to separate class called ZoomBorder.

ZoomBorder.cs

using System.Linq;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Input;
using System.Windows.Media;

namespace PanAndZoom
{
  public class ZoomBorder : Border
  {
    private UIElement child = null;
    private Point origin;
    private Point start;

    private TranslateTransform GetTranslateTransform(UIElement element)
    {
      return (TranslateTransform)((TransformGroup)element.RenderTransform)
        .Children.First(tr => tr is TranslateTransform);
    }

    private ScaleTransform GetScaleTransform(UIElement element)
    {
      return (ScaleTransform)((TransformGroup)element.RenderTransform)
        .Children.First(tr => tr is ScaleTransform);
    }

    public override UIElement Child
    {
      get { return base.Child; }
      set
      {
        if (value != null && value != this.Child)
          this.Initialize(value);
        base.Child = value;
      }
    }

    public void Initialize(UIElement element)
    {
      this.child = element;
      if (child != null)
      {
        TransformGroup group = new TransformGroup();
        ScaleTransform st = new ScaleTransform();
        group.Children.Add(st);
        TranslateTransform tt = new TranslateTransform();
        group.Children.Add(tt);
        child.RenderTransform = group;
        child.RenderTransformOrigin = new Point(0.0, 0.0);
        this.MouseWheel += child_MouseWheel;
        this.MouseLeftButtonDown += child_MouseLeftButtonDown;
        this.MouseLeftButtonUp += child_MouseLeftButtonUp;
        this.MouseMove += child_MouseMove;
        this.PreviewMouseRightButtonDown += new MouseButtonEventHandler(
          child_PreviewMouseRightButtonDown);
      }
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
      if (child != null)
      {
        // reset zoom
        var st = GetScaleTransform(child);
        st.ScaleX = 1.0;
        st.ScaleY = 1.0;

        // reset pan
        var tt = GetTranslateTransform(child);
        tt.X = 0.0;
        tt.Y = 0.0;
      }
    }

    #region Child Events

        private void child_MouseWheel(object sender, MouseWheelEventArgs e)
        {
            if (child != null)
            {
                var st = GetScaleTransform(child);
                var tt = GetTranslateTransform(child);

                double zoom = e.Delta > 0 ? .2 : -.2;
                if (!(e.Delta > 0) && (st.ScaleX < .4 || st.ScaleY < .4))
                    return;

                Point relative = e.GetPosition(child);
                double abosuluteX;
                double abosuluteY;

                abosuluteX = relative.X * st.ScaleX + tt.X;
                abosuluteY = relative.Y * st.ScaleY + tt.Y;

                st.ScaleX += zoom;
                st.ScaleY += zoom;

                tt.X = abosuluteX - relative.X * st.ScaleX;
                tt.Y = abosuluteY - relative.Y * st.ScaleY;
            }
        }

        private void child_MouseLeftButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
        {
            if (child != null)
            {
                var tt = GetTranslateTransform(child);
                start = e.GetPosition(this);
                origin = new Point(tt.X, tt.Y);
                this.Cursor = Cursors.Hand;
                child.CaptureMouse();
            }
        }

        private void child_MouseLeftButtonUp(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
        {
            if (child != null)
            {
                child.ReleaseMouseCapture();
                this.Cursor = Cursors.Arrow;
            }
        }

        void child_PreviewMouseRightButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
        {
            this.Reset();
        }

        private void child_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            if (child != null)
            {
                if (child.IsMouseCaptured)
                {
                    var tt = GetTranslateTransform(child);
                    Vector v = start - e.GetPosition(this);
                    tt.X = origin.X - v.X;
                    tt.Y = origin.Y - v.Y;
                }
            }
        }

        #endregion
    }
}

MainWindow.xaml

<Window x:Class="PanAndZoom.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:PanAndZoom"
        Title="PanAndZoom" Height="600" Width="900" WindowStartupLocation="CenterScreen">
    <Grid>
        <local:ZoomBorder x:Name="border" ClipToBounds="True" Background="Gray">
            <Image Source="image.jpg"/>
        </local:ZoomBorder>
    </Grid>
</Window>

MainWindow.xaml.cs

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Data;
using System.Windows.Documents;
using System.Windows.Input;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System.Windows.Media.Imaging;
using System.Windows.Navigation;
using System.Windows.Shapes;

namespace PanAndZoom
{
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nicely done! –  Dänu May 27 '12 at 13:27
1  
Sadly, I can't give you more point. This works really awesome. –  Tobiel Feb 26 at 0:34
1  
Before comments get blocked for "Nice Job!" or "Great Work" I just want to say Nice Job and Great Work. This is a WPF gem. It blows the wpf ext zoombox out of the water. –  Jesse Seger May 12 at 18:54
    
OUT standing. I might be able to go home tonight yet... +1000 –  Bruce Pierson Jun 15 at 2:45
    
AWESOME. I didn't though about such an implementation but it is really nice! Thank you so much! –  Noel Widmer Sep 15 at 12:09

Try this Zoom Control: http://wpfextensions.codeplex.com

usage of the control is very simple, reference to the wpfextensions assembly than:

<wpfext:ZoomControl>
    <Image Source="..."/>
</wpfext:ZoomControl>

Scrollbars not supported at this moment. (It will be in the next release which will be available in one or two week).

share|improve this answer
    
Yup, enjoying that. The rest of thee library is pretty trivial though. –  Stimul8d Nov 5 '09 at 12:45
    
There doesn't seem to be direct support for 'Show overlays (rectangle selection for example)' though, but for zoom/panning behavior, it is a great control. –  jsirr13 Oct 28 '13 at 22:08
  • Pan: Put the image inside of a Canvas. Implement Mouse Up, Down, and Move events to move the Canvas.Top, Canvas.Left properties. When down, you mark a isDraggingFlag to true, when up you set the flag to false. On move, you check if the flag is set, if it is you offset the Canvas.Top and Canvas.Left properties on the image within the canvas.
  • Zoom: Bind the slider to the Scale Transform of the Canvas
  • Show overlays: add additional canvas's with no background ontop the canvas containing the image.
  • show original image: image control inside of a ViewBox
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I wrote an article on codeproject.com on the implementation of a zoom and pan control for WPF.

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/WPF/zoomandpancontrol.aspx

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@Anothen and @Number8 - The Vector class is not available in Silverlight, so to make it work we just need to keep a record of the last position sighted the last time the MouseMove event was called, and compare the two points to find the difference; then adjust the transform.

XAML:

    <Border Name="viewboxBackground" Background="Black">
            <Viewbox Name="viewboxMain">
                <!--contents go here-->
            </Viewbox>
    </Border>  

Code-behind:

    public Point _mouseClickPos;
    public bool bMoving;


    public MainPage()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        viewboxMain.RenderTransform = new CompositeTransform();
    }

    void MouseMoveHandler(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {

        if (bMoving)
        {
            //get current transform
            CompositeTransform transform = viewboxMain.RenderTransform as CompositeTransform;

            Point currentPos = e.GetPosition(viewboxBackground);
            transform.TranslateX += (currentPos.X - _mouseClickPos.X) ;
            transform.TranslateY += (currentPos.Y - _mouseClickPos.Y) ;

            viewboxMain.RenderTransform = transform;

            _mouseClickPos = currentPos;
        }            
    }

    void MouseClickHandler(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
    {
        _mouseClickPos = e.GetPosition(viewboxBackground);
        bMoving = true;
    }

    void MouseReleaseHandler(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
    {
        bMoving = false;
    }

Also note that you don't need a TransformGroup or collection to implement pan and zoom; instead, a CompositeTransform will do the trick with less hassle.

I'm pretty sure this is really inefficient in terms of resource usage, but at least it works :)

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My London Underground sample does this, although with a map rather than a static image.

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A little improvement needed, I think. Does anyone know how to make proper zooming relative to mouse pointer? So that when you zoom-in the relative position of mouse pointer inside the control boundaries stays the same.

Setting RenderTransformOrigin brings terrible behavior, because when you change mouse position the whole control jumps to center at that point.

share|improve this answer

@ Merk

For ur solution insted of lambda expression you can use following code:

//var tt = (TranslateTransform)((TransformGroup)image.RenderTransform).Children.First(tr => tr is TranslateTransform);
        TranslateTransform tt = null;
        TransformGroup transformGroup = (TransformGroup)grid.RenderTransform;
        for (int i = 0; i < transformGroup.Children.Count; i++)
        {
            if (transformGroup.Children[i] is TranslateTransform)
                tt = (TranslateTransform)transformGroup.Children[i];
        }

this code can be use as is for .Net Frame work 3.0 or 2.0

Hope It helps you :-)

share|improve this answer

To zoom relative to the mouse position, all you need is:

var position = e.GetPosition(image1);
image1.RenderTransformOrigin = new Point(position.X / image1.ActualWidth, position.Y / image1.ActualHeight);
share|improve this answer

Yet another version of the same kind of control. It has similar functionality as the others, but it adds:

  1. Touch support (drag/pinch)
  2. The image can be deleted (normally, the Image control locks the image on disk, so you cannot delete it).
  3. An inner border child, so the panned image doesn't overlap the border. In case of borders with rounded rectangles, look for ClippedBorder classes.

Usage is simple:

<Controls:ImageViewControl ImagePath="{Binding ...}" />

And the code:

public class ImageViewControl : Border
{
    private Point origin;
    private Point start;
    private Image image;

    public ImageViewControl()
    {
        ClipToBounds = true;
        Loaded += OnLoaded;
    }

    #region ImagePath

    /// <summary>
    ///     ImagePath Dependency Property
    /// </summary>
    public static readonly DependencyProperty ImagePathProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("ImagePath", typeof (string), typeof (ImageViewControl), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(string.Empty, OnImagePathChanged));

    /// <summary>
    ///     Gets or sets the ImagePath property. This dependency property 
    ///     indicates the path to the image file.
    /// </summary>
    public string ImagePath
    {
        get { return (string) GetValue(ImagePathProperty); }
        set { SetValue(ImagePathProperty, value); }
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Handles changes to the ImagePath property.
    /// </summary>
    private static void OnImagePathChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var target = (ImageViewControl) d;
        var oldImagePath = (string) e.OldValue;
        var newImagePath = target.ImagePath;
        target.ReloadImage(newImagePath);
        target.OnImagePathChanged(oldImagePath, newImagePath);
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Provides derived classes an opportunity to handle changes to the ImagePath property.
    /// </summary>
    protected virtual void OnImagePathChanged(string oldImagePath, string newImagePath)
    {
    }

    #endregion

    private void OnLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs routedEventArgs)
    {
        image = new Image {
                              //IsManipulationEnabled = true,
                              RenderTransformOrigin = new Point(0.5, 0.5),
                              RenderTransform = new TransformGroup {
                                                                       Children = new TransformCollection {
                                                                                                              new ScaleTransform(),
                                                                                                              new TranslateTransform()
                                                                                                          }
                                                                   }
                          };
        // NOTE I use a border as the first child, to which I add the image. I do this so the panned image doesn't partly obscure the control's border.
        // In case you are going to use rounder corner's on this control, you may to update your clipping, as in this example:
        // http://wpfspark.wordpress.com/2011/06/08/clipborder-a-wpf-border-that-clips/
        var border = new Border {
                                    IsManipulationEnabled = true,
                                    ClipToBounds = true,
                                    Child = image
                                };
        Child = border;

        image.MouseWheel += (s, e) =>
                                {
                                    var zoom = e.Delta > 0
                                                   ? .2
                                                   : -.2;
                                    var position = e.GetPosition(image);
                                    image.RenderTransformOrigin = new Point(position.X / image.ActualWidth, position.Y / image.ActualHeight);
                                    var st = (ScaleTransform)((TransformGroup)image.RenderTransform).Children.First(tr => tr is ScaleTransform);
                                    st.ScaleX += zoom;
                                    st.ScaleY += zoom;
                                    e.Handled = true;
                                };

        image.MouseLeftButtonDown += (s, e) =>
                                         {
                                             if (e.ClickCount == 2)
                                                 ResetPanZoom();
                                             else
                                             {
                                                 image.CaptureMouse();
                                                 var tt = (TranslateTransform) ((TransformGroup) image.RenderTransform).Children.First(tr => tr is TranslateTransform);
                                                 start = e.GetPosition(this);
                                                 origin = new Point(tt.X, tt.Y);
                                             }
                                             e.Handled = true;
                                         };

        image.MouseMove += (s, e) =>
                               {
                                   if (!image.IsMouseCaptured) return;
                                   var tt = (TranslateTransform) ((TransformGroup) image.RenderTransform).Children.First(tr => tr is TranslateTransform);
                                   var v = start - e.GetPosition(this);
                                   tt.X = origin.X - v.X;
                                   tt.Y = origin.Y - v.Y;
                                   e.Handled = true;
                               };

        image.MouseLeftButtonUp += (s, e) => image.ReleaseMouseCapture();

        //NOTE I apply the manipulation to the border, and not to the image itself (which caused stability issues when translating)!
        border.ManipulationDelta += (o, e) =>
                                       {
                                           var st = (ScaleTransform)((TransformGroup)image.RenderTransform).Children.First(tr => tr is ScaleTransform);
                                           var tt = (TranslateTransform)((TransformGroup)image.RenderTransform).Children.First(tr => tr is TranslateTransform);

                                           st.ScaleX *= e.DeltaManipulation.Scale.X;
                                           st.ScaleY *= e.DeltaManipulation.Scale.X;
                                           tt.X += e.DeltaManipulation.Translation.X;
                                           tt.Y += e.DeltaManipulation.Translation.Y;

                                           e.Handled = true;
                                       };
    }

    private void ResetPanZoom()
    {
        var st = (ScaleTransform)((TransformGroup)image.RenderTransform).Children.First(tr => tr is ScaleTransform);
        var tt = (TranslateTransform)((TransformGroup)image.RenderTransform).Children.First(tr => tr is TranslateTransform);
        st.ScaleX = st.ScaleY = 1;
        tt.X = tt.Y = 0;
        image.RenderTransformOrigin = new Point(0.5, 0.5);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Load the image (and do not keep a hold on it, so we can delete the image without problems)
    /// </summary>
    /// <see cref="http://blogs.vertigo.com/personal/ralph/Blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=18"/>
    /// <param name="path"></param>
    private void ReloadImage(string path)
    {
        try
        {
            ResetPanZoom();
            // load the image, specify CacheOption so the file is not locked
            var bitmapImage = new BitmapImage();
            bitmapImage.BeginInit();
            bitmapImage.CacheOption = BitmapCacheOption.OnLoad;
            bitmapImage.UriSource = new Uri(path, UriKind.RelativeOrAbsolute);
            bitmapImage.EndInit();
            image.Source = bitmapImage;
        }
        catch (SystemException e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Only problem I found was that if a path to an image is specified in the XAML, it tries to render it before the image object is constructed (i.e. before OnLoaded is called). To fix, I moved the "image = new Image ..." code , from the onLoaded method to the constructor. Thanks. –  Mitch Dec 27 '12 at 20:39

To get a professional Zoom Control for WPF check out the ZoomPanel.

It is not free, but is very easy to use and has many features - animated zooming and panning, support for ScrollViewer, mouse wheel support, included ZoomController (with move, zoom in, zoom out, rectangle zoom, reset buttons). It also comes with many code samples.

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protected by Community Jul 11 '11 at 9:24

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