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Please Consider:

dalist={{21, 22}, {26, 13}, {32, 17}, {31, 11}, {30, 9}, 
        {25, 12}, {12, 16}, {18, 20}, {13, 23}, {19, 21}, 
        {14, 16}, {14, 22}, {18,22}, {10, 22}, {17, 23}}


ScreenCenter = {20, 15}

FrameXYs = {{4.32, 3.23}, {35.68, 26.75}}

Graphics[{EdgeForm[Thick], White, Rectangle @@ FrameXYs, 
          Black, Point@dalist, Red, Disk[ScreenCenter, .5]}]

enter image description here

What I would like to do is to compute, for each point, its angle in a coordinate system such as :

enter image description here

Above is the Deisred output, those are frequency count of point given a particular "Angle Bin". Once I know how to compute the angle i should be able to do that.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Mathematica has a special plot function for this purpose: ListPolarPlot. You need to convert your x,y pairs to theta, r pairs, for instance as follows:

ListPolarPlot[{ArcTan[##], EuclideanDistance[##]} & @@@ (#-ScreenCenter & /@ dalist), 
          PolarAxes -> True, 
          PolarGridLines -> Automatic, 
          Joined -> False, 
          PolarTicks -> {"Degrees", Automatic}, 
          BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Arial", FontWeight -> Bold,FontSize -> 12}, 
          PlotStyle -> {Red, PointSize -> 0.02}
]

enter image description here


UPDATE

As requested per comment, polar histograms can be made as follows:

maxScale = 100;
angleDivisions = 20;
dAng = (2 \[Pi])/angleDivisions;

Some test data:

(counts = Table[RandomInteger[{0, 100}], {ang, angleDivisions}]) // BarChart

enter image description here

ListPolarPlot[{{0, maxScale}}, 
    PolarAxes -> True, PolarGridLines -> Automatic, 
    PolarTicks -> {"Degrees", Automatic}, 
    BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Arial", FontWeight -> Bold, FontSize -> 12}, 
    PlotStyle -> {None}, 
    Epilog -> {Opacity[0.7], Blue, 
               Table[
                 Polygon@
                  {
                   {0, 0}, 
                   counts[[ang + 1]] {Cos[ang dAng - dAng/2],Sin[ang dAng- dAng/2]}, 
                   counts[[ang + 1]] {Cos[ang dAng + dAng/2],Sin[ang dAng+ dAng/2]}
                  },   
                 {ang, 0, angleDivisions - 1}
               ]}
]

enter image description here

A small visual improvement using Disk sectors instead of Polygons:

ListPolarPlot[{{0, maxScale}}, 
    PolarAxes -> True, PolarGridLines -> Automatic, 
    PolarTicks -> {"Degrees", Automatic}, 
    BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Arial", FontWeight -> Bold, 
    FontSize -> 12}, PlotStyle -> {None}, 
    Epilog -> {Opacity[0.7], Blue, 
               Table[
                 Disk[{0,0},counts[[ang+1]],{ang dAng-dAng/2,ang dAng+dAng/2}],       
                 {ang, 0, angleDivisions - 1}
               ]
              }
]

enter image description here

A clearer separation of the 'bars' is obtained with the addition of EdgeForm[{Black, Thickness[0.005]}] in the Epilog. Now the numbers marking the rings still have the unnecessary decimal point trailing them. Following the plot with the replacement /. Style[num_?MachineNumberQ, List[]] -> Style[num // Round, List[]] removes those. The end result is:

enter image description here

The above plot can also be generated with SectorChart although this plot is primarily intended to show varying width and height of the data, and isn't fine-tuned for plots where you have fixed-width sectors and you want to highlight directions and data counts in those directions. But it can be done by using SectorOrigin. The problem is I take it that the midpoint of a sector codes for its direction so to have 0 deg in the mid of a sector I have to offset the origin by \[Pi]/angleDivisions and specify the ticks by hand as they get rotated too:

SectorChart[
   {ConstantArray[1, Length[counts]], counts}\[Transpose], 
   SectorOrigin -> {-\[Pi]/angleDivisions, "Counterclockwise"}, 
   PolarAxes -> True, PolarGridLines -> Automatic, 
   PolarTicks -> 
    {
     Table[{i \[Degree] + \[Pi]/angleDivisions, i \[Degree]}, {i, 0, 345, 15}], 
     Automatic
    }, 
   ChartStyle -> {Directive[EdgeForm[{Black, Thickness[0.005]}], Blue]},
   BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Arial", FontWeight -> Bold, 
   FontSize -> 12}
 ]

enter image description here

The plot is almost the same, but it is more interactive (tooltips and so).

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Thank You Sjoerd, is there such thing as a polar histogram ? –  500 Sep 14 '11 at 19:11
    
@500 see update –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Sep 14 '11 at 19:53
    
t0.gstatic.com/… –  belisarius Sep 14 '11 at 20:15
    
@belisarius Close, but no cigar ;-) –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Sep 14 '11 at 20:33
    
@belisarius: math.stackexchange.com/q/54506/954 –  Simon Sep 14 '11 at 22:54

That seems to be the polar coordinate system. The Cartesian-to-polar conversion formulas are in that same article:

enter image description here

This returns the angle in radians.

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5  
To add to Blender's answer, use the two parameter form of ArcTan as it automatically accounts for the quadrant. –  rcollyer Sep 14 '11 at 16:25
    
Thank You, What would be the best way to set ScreenCenter = {20, 15} as my origin for the conversion ? –  500 Sep 14 '11 at 17:41
1  
Replace all the ys with y + ScreenCenter.y and do similarly for x. –  Blender Sep 14 '11 at 22:33

This

N@ArcTan[#[[1]], #[[2]]] & /@ (# - ScreenCenter & /@ dalist)

returns the list of angles of the ray from ScreenCenter to each point, in radians and between -pi and pi.

That is, I assumed you want the angle between each point in your plot and the red dot.

Note the use of ArcTan[x,y] rather than ArcTan[y/x], which automatically chooses the appropriate sign (otherwise you'd have to do it by hand, as in @Blender's answer).

share|improve this answer
    
Hey this is really clear thank you ! –  500 Sep 15 '11 at 1:35
    
I am sorry I am going crazy. When i try to implement with you solution or Sjoerd and can`t draw hi histogram with either on my actual data the quadrant are visually wrong. I am so confused, could you show me an example ? For me Upper left if down right, Upper Right, down left. –  500 Sep 15 '11 at 3:17
    
@500 I don't understand what you are asking! What is "implement" here? Did you understand that these are angles, in radians, from -pi to pi and measured from the x-axis? –  acl Sep 15 '11 at 9:56

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