Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm working on upgrading a Rails 2.3.11, Ruby 1.9.2 app to Rails 3.0.10, and attachment_fu no longer works.

I'm looking at changing to paperclip, carrierwave, or dragonfly for file uploads, or maybe a Rails 3 compatible, maintained version of attachment_fu.

Which of these options would be the best to use in terms of performance, how well maintained it is, how easy it is to upgrade from attachment_fu, and maybe is it going to be Rails 3.1 compatible? What are the major strengths and disadvantages of each one?

Any insight would be appreciated.

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by bummi, Kevin Brown, nicael, Tiny Giant, rene Jun 20 at 7:59

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    

4 Answers 4

up vote 37 down vote accepted

I've used both Paperclip and Carrierwave, and if I were you, I'd go for Carrierwave. It's a lot more flexible. I also love the fact that it doesnt clutter your models with configuration. You can define uploader classes instead. It allows you to easily reuse, extend etc your upload configuration.

Did you watch the Carrierwave railscast? http://railscasts.com/episodes/253-carrierwave-file-uploads

Paperclip is not a bad choice though, it's been the "best" choice for a long time. But Carrierwave definitely seems like the new generation ;)

share|improve this answer
3  
Thanks! I just watched the railscast, and the paperclip one as well. I think I'll be going with Carrierwave; it seems like that's what most people are saying to use. Now for the fun part upgrading from attachment_fu ... –  keithepley Sep 14 '11 at 20:50
1  
There is a way to easily migrate from paperclip to carrierwave, but unfortunately, it's not the case for attachment_fu. From the carrierwave github page: "Unfortunately attachment_fu differs too much in philosophy for there to be a sensible compatibility mode. Patches for migrating from other solutions will be happily accepted." :( –  Robin Sep 14 '11 at 21:34
1  
If you are trying to work with Rails 2.3.x and migrate from attachment_fu to CarrierWave first, I would suggest Paperclip over CarrierWave. When you are using the 0.4.x branch of CW with Rails 2.3.x, you can't set the content_type of a file on upload, which was a deal breaker for me. If you are migrating from attachment_fu and upgrading to rails 3, then you'll be fine, and CarrierWave is a great option. –  wchrisjohnson Feb 19 '12 at 18:40

I have used CarrierWave and after some hours of frustration I'm switching to Paperclip.

Here are the problems I have seen with CarrierWave:

  • You can't validate file size. There is a wiki article that explains how to do it, but it does not work.
  • Integrity validations do not work when using MiniMagick (very convenient if you are concerned about RAM usage). You can upload a corrupted image file and CarrierWave will throw an error at first, but the next time will swallow it.
  • You can't delete the original file. You can instead resize it, compress, etc. There is a wiki article explaining how to do it, but again it does not work.
  • It depends on external libraries such as RMagick or MiniMagick. Paperclip works directly with the convert command line (ImageMagick). So, if you have problems with Minimagick (I had), you will lose hours diving in Google searches. Both RMagick and Minimagick are abandoned at the time of this writing (I contacted the author of Minimagic, no response).
  • It needs some configuration files. This is seen as an advantage, but I don't like having single configuration files around my project just for one gem. Configuration in the model seems more natural to me. This is a matter of personal taste anyway.
  • If you find some bug and report it, the dev team is really absent and busy. They will tell you to fix bugs yourself. It seems like a personal project that is improved in spare time. For me it's not valid for a professional project with deadlines.
share|improve this answer
5  
yep, paperclip is making a comeback, and the fact that it works directly with ImageMagick is a big plus –  marflar Apr 7 '12 at 10:35
    
paperclip also has its drawbacks, so try it and if it works for you stay with it. It didn't work for me either, so I implemented my own lib for image uploads. But if I were to choose one, I'd go for paperclip for the (big) reasons explained above. –  David Morales May 30 '12 at 15:19
9  
are these drawbacks still relevant? –  Nick Ginanto Nov 25 '12 at 9:42
1  
First Minimagick has been picked back up. Second while it is true that Paperclip works directly with imageMagick, it also makes it pretty hard to interact directly with it. I just moved from using Paperclip to CarrierWave because Paperclip does to much for you, and makes it hard to customize things when you need to. Not to mention the Paperclip code base is 'bloated' as they say, while the carrier wave is leaner, which is most likely a direct result of carrier wave leaving more things up to you, while paperclip tries to do more for you. –  rovermicrover May 12 '13 at 23:11
1  
The previous developer on our application had used CarrierWave to handle image uploads. We recently made the decision to change our schema to enable multiple images at once, and so we employed "embedded" documents in our Mongoid schema. Unfortunately, there is a three-year-old bug in CarrierWave that makes a mess of uploads to embedded documents. Paperclip for Mongoid, on the other hand, worked brilliantly. –  vote539 Sep 30 '13 at 2:49

I would ask myself:

  • Will I be changing image size often? Example: if you want to let your users change the size of their pictures (or your need flexibility in size for some other reason), or really fast development.

Yes: Dragonfly

No: either Carrierwave or Paperclip

share|improve this answer

(reference :
http://cloudinary.com/blog/ruby_on_rails_image_uploads_with_carrierwave_and_cloudinary,http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7419731/rails-3-paperclip-vs-carrierwave-vs-dragonfly-vs-attachment-fu.etc)

Paper_Clip

Paperclip is intended as an easy file attachment library for Active Record. The intent behind it was to keep setup as easy as possible and to treat files as much like other attributes as possible. This means they aren't saved to their final locations on disk, nor are they deleted if set to nil, until ActiveRecord::Base#save is called. It manages validations based on size and presence, if required. It can transform its assigned image into thumbnails if needed, and the prerequisites are as simple as installing ImageMagick (which, for most modern Unix-based systems, is as easy as installing the right packages). Attached files are saved to the filesystem and referenced in the browser by an easily understandable specification, which has sensible and useful defaults.

Advantage :

1.validations, Paperclip introduces several validators to validate your attachment:
AttachmentContentTypeValidator
AttachmentPresenceValidator
AttachmentSizeValidator
2.Deleting an Attachment
Set the attribute to nil and save.
@user.avatar = nil @user.save
3.Paperclip is better for an organic Rails environment using activerecord and not all the other alternatives. Paperclip is much easier to handle for beginning rails developers and it also has advanced capabilities for the advanced developer.
4. A huge fan of Paperclip because it doesn't require RMagick, it's very easy to set it up to post through to Amazon S3 and declaring everything in the models (validations, etc) keeps things clean.
5.With respect to multiple file uploads and progress feedback, both are possible with both Paperclip and Attachment_fu, but both typically require some elbow grease with iframes and Apache to get working.

CarrierWave

This gem provides a simple and extremely flexible way to upload files from Ruby applications. It works well with Rack based web applications, such as Ruby on Rails.

CarrierWave advantage

1.Simple Model entity integration. Adding a single string ‘image’ attribute for referencing the uploaded image.
2."Magic" model methods for uploading and remotely fetching images.
3.HTML file upload integration using a standard file tag and another hidden tag for maintaining the already uploaded "cached" version.
4.Straight-forward interface for creating derived image versions with different dimensions and formats. Image processing tools are nicely hidden behind the scenes.
5.Model methods for getting the public URLs of the images and their resized versions for HTML embedding.
6.if built-in rails caching, Carrierwave will perform better, as the files can be loaded without any processing. If you don't do any processing, it doesn't matter.
7.Generates thumbs on upload (saves CPU time)
8.Can use files directly from a static/cached document
9.Doesn't need any cache-front
10.Supports various storage backends (S3, Cloudfiles, GridFS, normal files) easy to extend to new storage types if needed.
One of the fact that it doesn't clutter your models with configuration. You can define uploader classes instead. It allows you to easily reuse, extend etc your upload configuration.
What we liked most is the fact the CarrierWave is very modular. You can easily switch your storage engine between a local file system, Cloud-based AWS S3, and more. You can switch the image processing module between RMagick, MiniMagick and other tools. You can also use local file system in your dev env and switch to S3 storage in the production system. Carrierwave has good support for exterior things such as DataMapper, Mongoid, Sequel and even can be used with a 3rd party image managment such as cloudinary The solution seems most complete with support coverage for about anything, but the solution is also much messier (for me at least) since there is a lot more code that you need to handle. Need to appreciate the modular approach that CarrierWave takes. It’s agnostic as to which of the popular S3 clients you use, supporting both aws/s3 and right_aws. It’s also ORM agnostic and not tightly coupled to Active Record. The tight coupling of Paperclip has caused us some grief at work.

CarrierWave disadvantage

1.You can't validate file size. There is a wiki article that explains how to do it, but it does not work.
2.Integrity validations do not work when using MiniMagick (very convenient if you are concerned about RAM usage). You can upload a corrupted image file and CarrierWave will throw an error at first, but the next time will swallow it.
3.You can't delete the original file. You can instead resize it, compress, etc. There is a wiki article explaining how to do it, but again it does not work.
4.It depends on external libraries such as RMagick or MiniMagick. Paperclip works directly with the convert command line (ImageMagick). So, if you have problems with Minimagick (I had), you will lose hours diving in Google searches. Both RMagick and Minimagick are abandoned at the time of this writing (I contacted the author of Minimagic, no response).
5.It needs some configuration files. This is seen as an advantage, but I don't like having single configuration files around my project just for one gem. Configuration in the model seems more natural to me. This is a matter of personal taste anyway.
6.If you find some bug and report it, the dev team is really absent and busy. They will tell you to fix bugs yourself. It seems like a personal project that is improved in spare time. For me it's not valid for a professional project with deadlines.
7.Doesn't natively support mongomapper
8.Uses storagespace for every file/thumb generated. If you use normal file storage, you might run out of inodes!

Dragonfly Gem 1.The impressive thing about Dragonfly, the thing that separates it from most other image processing plugins, is that it allows on-the-fly resizing from the view.
2.Not needing to configure thumbnail sizing or other actions in a separate file is a huge time and frustration saver. It makes Rails view code like image_tag @product.image.thumb('150x150#') possible. 3.The magic is all made possible by caching. Instead of building the processed version on upload and then linking to individual versions of the image, the plugin generates images as they are requested. While this is a problem for the first load, the newly created image is http cached for all subsequent loads, by default using Rack::Cache, though other more robust solutions are available should scaling become an issue.

Advantage :

1.Will I be changing image size often? Example: if you want to let your users change the size of their pictures (or your need flexibility in size for some other reason), or really fast development.
2.Yes: Dragonfly
3.No: either Carrierwave or Paperclip
4.can be used it with mongomapper with no trouble, but Carrierwave have dropped support for monog mapper.
5.As long as cache-proxy in front, it's fine with Dragonfly.
6.Should work with mongomapper, as it only extends ActiveModel
7.Generates thumbs on the fly (easier to create new layouts/thumbsizes)
8.Only one file stored! Saves space :)
9.Dragonfly does processing on the fly, i.e. (is meant to be used behind a cache-proxy such as Varnish, Squid or Rack::Cache, so that while the first request may take some time, subsequent requests should be super-quick!)

Disadvantage :

1.Eats CPU on every request if you don't have a cache-proxy, rack::cache or similar.
2.No way to access thumbs as files if needed.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.