Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How does Visual Studio show the elements of a vector, or the characters of a string, in C++? Is there a way for me to make it show my own classes in a custom way?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zf0e8s14(v=VS.100).aspx

For native code, you can add custom data type expansions to the file autoexp.dat, which is located in the Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\Packages\Debugger directory. Instructions on how to write autoexp rules are located in the file itself.

For this class:

template<class T>
struct  auto_array {
     T* data;
     int Len;
};

the autoexp.data might look like:

auto_array<*> {
    children
    (
        #array
        (
            expr :      $e.Data[$i],
            size :      $e.Len
        )
    )
    preview
    (
        #(
            "[", $e.Len , "](",
            #array
            (
                expr :  $e.Data[$i],
                size :  $e.Len
            ),
            ")"
        )
    )
}

KindDragon reports that Visual Studio 2012 uses a new file format: natvis

share|improve this answer
    
Ooh interesting! Seems rather easy as well, thanks a lot! :) –  Mehrdad Sep 14 '11 at 19:43
4  
Visual Studio 2012 uses a new file format natvis blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2012/07/12/10329460.aspx –  KindDragon Aug 10 '12 at 10:40

You can add visualizers for custom C++ types to the autoexp.dat file. The format used in the file and the location change from version to version of Visual Studio but if you Google for autoexp.dat you should find some examples of how to customize it.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool, thanks! +1 –  Mehrdad Sep 14 '11 at 19:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.