Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have this code:

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) void getName(void)
{
    char buf[20];
    int slotNumber = 1;

    DWORD tempdw;
    DWORD hStorm_LOBBYPTR;
    hStorm_LOBBYPTR = (DWORD)GetModuleHandleW(L"Storm.dll") + 0x1000 + 0x40000 + 0x8000;


   __asm
    {
     PUSHAD
     MOV        EAX, DWORD PTR DS:[hStorm_LOBBYPTR]
     TEST       EAX, EAX
     JE         nick_false
     MOV        ECX, DWORD PTR DS:[EAX+0xC464]
     TEST       ECX, ECX
     JE         nick_false
     MOV        EAX, DWORD PTR DS:[ECX+0x170+0xB0]
     TEST       EAX, EAX
     JE         nick_false
     MOV        EDX, slotNumber
     MOV        ECX, DWORD PTR DS:[EAX+EDX*4]
     MOV        EAX, DWORD PTR DS:[ECX+0x1A0]
     MOV        ECX, DWORD PTR DS:[EAX+0x1E4]
     MOV        EAX, DWORD PTR DS:[ECX+0x1E4]
     MOV        ECX, DWORD PTR DS:[EAX+0x1E8]
     MOV        tempdw, ECX
     POPAD
     JMP        nick_true

nick_false:
     XOR        EAX, EAX
     MOV        tempdw, EAX
     POPAD
    }

    sprintf(buf,"%d", tempdw);
    MessageBox(0, buf, "Dll Injector", MB_ICONEXCLAMATION | MB_OK);

tempdw is a pointer, but when I try to look at it, I have this kind of garbage in MessageBox: screenshot pointer messagebox

What should I do?

share|improve this question
2  
For starters, use MessageBoxA to be sure you're using the ASCII version. Also, you'd usually use %0p as the format specifier for a pointer. –  Ben Voigt Sep 14 '11 at 18:08
1  
You say tempdw is a pointer - you should start by declaring it as such. –  Mark Ransom Sep 14 '11 at 18:08
    
AFAIK, pointers should be formatted with "%x". –  Max Sep 14 '11 at 18:09
    
It looks like a non-null-terminated string, which means the call to sprintf failed for some reason. Not knowing assembly, I can't imagine how that could fail though. –  Mooing Duck Sep 14 '11 at 18:11
    
MessageA doesn't help, declaring it as a pointer makes no difference. –  Jugo Sep 14 '11 at 18:11
show 7 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My guess is that your assembly stomps over something (possibly a register) which means that the sprintf fails and the buffer just contains random stack noise.

Check this out by removing the assembly.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Look up the "%p" print specifier in printf:

char temp_buffer[64];
char * p_temp_buffer = temp_buffer; // A pointer to display.
//...
sprintf(temp_buffer, "%p", (void *) p_temp_buffer);
MessageBox(0, temp_buffer, "Pointer value", MB_OK);
share|improve this answer
    
That may well be so but it could not explain the behaviour reported in the question. –  David Heffernan Sep 14 '11 at 18:27
    
The OP's question is how to display a pointer in a message box; which is what I answered. I tend not to answer unexplained behavior questions. –  Thomas Matthews Sep 14 '11 at 18:31
    
But in this case, the unexplained behaviour is what Jugo is stuck on. –  David Heffernan Sep 14 '11 at 18:33
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.