Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sorry, I did not provide the code when I posted earlier, due to the indentation. Now, I am providing the code. As I mentioned earlier, I threw an exception inside the sample code, and i still have a 0 which is returned by the code. I have spent some times trying to figure out, but I could not come with the exact answer.

#include <stdexcept> 
#include <iostream> 
#include <string> 

using namespace std; 


class myException_Product_Not_Found: public exception  
{ 
    public: 
      virtual const char* what() const throw() 
     { 
      return "Product not found"; 
     } 

} myExcept_Prod_Not_Found;   

int getProductID(int ids[], string names[], int numProducts, string target) 
{ 

   for(int i=0; i<numProducts; i++)  
   { 
      if(names[i]==target) 
        return ids[i];           
   }  
    try 
    { 
     throw myExcept_Prod_Not_Found;    
    } 
     catch (exception& e) 
    { 
     cout<<e.what()<<endl;      
    }                                        
} 

int main() //sample code to test the getProductID function 
{ 
  int productIds[]={4,5,8,10,13}; 
  string products[]={"computer","flash drive","mouse","printer","camera"}; 
  cout<<getProductID(productIds, products, 5, "computer")<<endl; 
  cout<<getProductID(productIds, products, 5, "laptop")<<endl; 
  cout<<getProductID(productIds, products, 5, "printer")<<endl;   
  return 0; 
}  

c++ exception

share|improve this question
    
    
Dude, wtf. You already asked this. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 14 '11 at 18:37
add comment

2 Answers 2

try 
{ 
 throw myExcept_Prod_Not_Found;    
} 
 catch (exception& e) 
{ 
 cout<<e.what()<<endl;      
} 

You are catching the exception, essentially saying that you are handling it with the message printed to cout.

This will re-throw the exception if you wish to propagate it.

try 
{ 
 throw myExcept_Prod_Not_Found;    
} 
 catch (exception& e) 
{ 
 cout<<e.what()<<endl;      
 throw;
} 

If you wanted to not return 0 from your main function after you've propagated, you have to do that yourself.

int main()
{ 
  try {
    // ...
  } catch (...) {
    return 1;
  }   
  return 0; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Tom, after adding "throw" I obtained what I wanted but, I also got an error message. Here is the message that I got: "This application has requested the Runtime to terminate it in an unusual way. Please contact the aplication's support team for more information." –  T3000 Sep 14 '11 at 18:27
    
@T3000 That is the expected behavior. Windows just tells you (the user of the application) that the programmer (also happens to be you) messed up somehow. I don't know how you want to handle it, but I'll guess and update my post. –  Tom Kerr Sep 14 '11 at 18:30
add comment

Your getProductID() function doesn't return from all possible execution paths. So when the function exits without a return statement, you get random garbage. This is the case when the product string isn't found.

Your try/catch block is a red herring, as it doesn't affect the remainder of the code in any way (the exception is caught immediately).

Two unrelated tips for improvement:

  1. Catch exceptions by constant reference.

  2. Use std::find rather than your manual loop; that way, you can write the entire function body in two lines.

  3. Don't use C-style arrays; instead, use std::vector.

share|improve this answer
    
I even tried using a boolean such that if the target has been found, the the value of the boolean is true, otherwise it is false. Then, I check the value of the boolean, if it is false (once we left the loop for) then try/catch. But it did not take me anywhere. –  T3000 Sep 14 '11 at 18:34
    
@T3000 -- what has that to do with anything? –  Kerrek SB Sep 14 '11 at 18:35
    
ok, I will try your advice to improve my code. Thanks! –  T3000 Sep 14 '11 at 19:02
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.