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I need to know if there is an easy way of detecting only the files that were deleted, modified or created on an NTFS volume.

I have written a program for offsite backup in C++. After the first backup, I check the archive bit of each file to see if there was any change made, and back up only the files that were changed. Also, it backs up from the VSS snapshot in order to prevent file locks.

This seems to work fine on most file systems, but for some with lots of files and directories, this process takes too long and often the backup takes more than a day to finish backing up.

I tried using the change journal to easily detect changes made on an NTFS volume, but the change journal would show a lot of records, most of them relating to small temporary files created and destroyed. Also, I could the file name, file reference number, and the parent file reference number, but I could not get the full file path. The parent file reference number is somehow supposed to give you the parent directory path.

EDIT: This needs to run everyday, so at the beginning of every scan, it should record only the changes that took place since the last scan. Or atleast, there should be a way to say changes since so and so time and date.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted
+250

You can enumerate all the files on a volume using FSCTL_ENUM_USN_DATA. This is a fast process (my tests returned better than 6000 records per second even on a very old machine, and 20000+ is more typical) and only includes files that currently exist.

The data returned includes the file flags as well as the USNs so you could check for changes whichever way you prefer.

You will still need to work out the full path for the files by matching the parent IDs with the file IDs of the directories. One approach would be to use a buffer large enough to hold all the file records simultaneously, and search through the records to find the matching parent for each file you need to back up. For large volumes you would probably need to process the directory records into a more efficient data structure, perhaps a hash table.

Alternately, you can read/reread the records for the parent directories as needed. This would be less efficient, but the performance might still be satisfactory depending on how many files are being backed up. Windows does appear to cache the data returned by FSCTL_ENUM_USN_DATA.

This program searches the C volume for files named test.txt and returns information about any files found, as well as about their parent directories.

#include <Windows.h>

#include <stdio.h>

#define BUFFER_SIZE (1024 * 1024)

HANDLE drive;
USN maxusn;

void show_record (USN_RECORD * record)
{
    void * buffer;
    MFT_ENUM_DATA mft_enum_data;
    DWORD bytecount = 1;
    USN_RECORD * parent_record;

    WCHAR * filename;
    WCHAR * filenameend;

    printf("=================================================================\n");
    printf("RecordLength: %u\n", record->RecordLength);
    printf("MajorVersion: %u\n", (DWORD)record->MajorVersion);
    printf("MinorVersion: %u\n", (DWORD)record->MinorVersion);
    printf("FileReferenceNumber: %lu\n", record->FileReferenceNumber);
    printf("ParentFRN: %lu\n", record->ParentFileReferenceNumber);
    printf("USN: %lu\n", record->Usn);
    printf("Timestamp: %lu\n", record->TimeStamp);
    printf("Reason: %u\n", record->Reason);
    printf("SourceInfo: %u\n", record->SourceInfo);
    printf("SecurityId: %u\n", record->SecurityId);
    printf("FileAttributes: %x\n", record->FileAttributes);
    printf("FileNameLength: %u\n", (DWORD)record->FileNameLength);

    filename = (WCHAR *)(((BYTE *)record) + record->FileNameOffset);
    filenameend= (WCHAR *)(((BYTE *)record) + record->FileNameOffset + record->FileNameLength);

    printf("FileName: %.*ls\n", filenameend - filename, filename);

    buffer = VirtualAlloc(NULL, BUFFER_SIZE, MEM_RESERVE | MEM_COMMIT, PAGE_READWRITE);

    if (buffer == NULL)
    {
        printf("VirtualAlloc: %u\n", GetLastError());
        return;
    }

    mft_enum_data.StartFileReferenceNumber = record->ParentFileReferenceNumber;
    mft_enum_data.LowUsn = 0;
    mft_enum_data.HighUsn = maxusn;

    if (!DeviceIoControl(drive, FSCTL_ENUM_USN_DATA, &mft_enum_data, sizeof(mft_enum_data), buffer, BUFFER_SIZE, &bytecount, NULL))
    {
        printf("FSCTL_ENUM_USN_DATA (show_record): %u\n", GetLastError());
        return;
    }

    parent_record = (USN_RECORD *)((USN *)buffer + 1);

    if (parent_record->FileReferenceNumber != record->ParentFileReferenceNumber)
    {
        printf("=================================================================\n");
        printf("Couldn't retrieve FileReferenceNumber %u\n", record->ParentFileReferenceNumber);
        return;
    }

    show_record(parent_record);
}

void check_record(USN_RECORD * record)
{
    WCHAR * filename;
    WCHAR * filenameend;

    filename = (WCHAR *)(((BYTE *)record) + record->FileNameOffset);
    filenameend= (WCHAR *)(((BYTE *)record) + record->FileNameOffset + record->FileNameLength);

    if (filenameend - filename != 8) return;

    if (wcsncmp(filename, L"test.txt", 8) != 0) return;

    show_record(record);
}

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    MFT_ENUM_DATA mft_enum_data;
    DWORD bytecount = 1;
    void * buffer;
    USN_RECORD * record;
    USN_RECORD * recordend;
    USN_JOURNAL_DATA * journal;
    DWORDLONG nextid;
    DWORDLONG filecount = 0;
    DWORD starttick, endtick;

    starttick = GetTickCount();

    printf("Allocating memory.\n");

    buffer = VirtualAlloc(NULL, BUFFER_SIZE, MEM_RESERVE | MEM_COMMIT, PAGE_READWRITE);

    if (buffer == NULL)
    {
        printf("VirtualAlloc: %u\n", GetLastError());
        return 0;
    }

    printf("Opening volume.\n");

    drive = CreateFile(L"\\\\?\\c:", GENERIC_READ, FILE_SHARE_DELETE | FILE_SHARE_READ | FILE_SHARE_WRITE, NULL, OPEN_ALWAYS, FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING, NULL);

    if (drive == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        printf("CreateFile: %u\n", GetLastError());
        return 0;
    }

    printf("Calling FSCTL_QUERY_USN_JOURNAL\n");

    if (!DeviceIoControl(drive, FSCTL_QUERY_USN_JOURNAL, NULL, 0, buffer, BUFFER_SIZE, &bytecount, NULL))
    {
        printf("FSCTL_QUERY_USN_JOURNAL: %u\n", GetLastError());
        return 0;
    }

    journal = (USN_JOURNAL_DATA *)buffer;

    printf("UsnJournalID: %lu\n", journal->UsnJournalID);
    printf("FirstUsn: %lu\n", journal->FirstUsn);
    printf("NextUsn: %lu\n", journal->NextUsn);
    printf("LowestValidUsn: %lu\n", journal->LowestValidUsn);
    printf("MaxUsn: %lu\n", journal->MaxUsn);
    printf("MaximumSize: %lu\n", journal->MaximumSize);
    printf("AllocationDelta: %lu\n", journal->AllocationDelta);

    maxusn = journal->MaxUsn;

    mft_enum_data.StartFileReferenceNumber = 0;
    mft_enum_data.LowUsn = 0;
    mft_enum_data.HighUsn = maxusn;

    for (;;)
    {
//      printf("=================================================================\n");
//      printf("Calling FSCTL_ENUM_USN_DATA\n");

        if (!DeviceIoControl(drive, FSCTL_ENUM_USN_DATA, &mft_enum_data, sizeof(mft_enum_data), buffer, BUFFER_SIZE, &bytecount, NULL))
        {
            printf("=================================================================\n");
            printf("FSCTL_ENUM_USN_DATA: %u\n", GetLastError());
            printf("Final ID: %lu\n", nextid);
            printf("File count: %lu\n", filecount);
            endtick = GetTickCount();
            printf("Ticks: %u\n", endtick - starttick);
            return 0;
        }

//      printf("Bytes returned: %u\n", bytecount);

        nextid = *((DWORDLONG *)buffer);
//      printf("Next ID: %lu\n", nextid);

        record = (USN_RECORD *)((USN *)buffer + 1);
        recordend = (USN_RECORD *)(((BYTE *)buffer) + bytecount);

        while (record < recordend)
        {
            filecount++;
            check_record(record);
            record = (USN_RECORD *)(((BYTE *)record) + record->RecordLength);
        }

        mft_enum_data.StartFileReferenceNumber = nextid;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hey Harry, this is awesome. I will try this out. One questions though, how do we know if a new file that was created is something we need to backup? Because Windows creates and deletes a lot of temporary files, and it would be futile to see if they are still in existence or not. –  roymustang86 Sep 19 '11 at 13:27
3  
This is the "scanning the Master File Table" I mentioned in my answer. +1 for example code. But it should be combined with reading the Journal, you shouldn't try to use this instead of the journal. –  Ben Voigt Sep 19 '11 at 15:51
1  
Actually, you can use the USN returned by this method to determine which files are changed since the last run. However, you still need to read the journal once to get the current USN before starting the scan (otherwise modifications made during the scan could be missed on both this and the subsequent scan). And don't the the USN filtering capability of MFT_ENUM_DATA, you do need to enumerate all records in order to get information on parent directories. –  Ben Voigt Sep 19 '11 at 16:47
    
Hey Ben, in my last implementation, I used to store the USN record number in the database. But yes, we have to store the file reference number and the parent file reference number of each file and query it to get the path. –  roymustang86 Sep 19 '11 at 20:08
1  
@Ben, I think it might be reasonable to use the USN filtering in FSCTL_ENUM_USN_DATA to find the changed files, then make separate calls to look up the parent directories. That way you'd only be processing data for parent directories that you actually needed. I'm not sure about performance, but I gather the MFT is pretty well optimised, so as long as you cache the data you get I think you might be OK. –  Harry Johnston Sep 19 '11 at 21:42

The change journal is your best bet. You can use the file reference numbers to match file creation/deletion pairs and thus ignore temporary files, without having to process them any further.

I think you have to scan the Master File Table to make sense of ParentFileReferenceNumber. Of course you only need to keep track of directories when doing this, and use a data structure that will allow you to quickly lookup the information, so you only need to scan the MFT once.

share|improve this answer
    
codeproject.com/KB/files/Eyes_on_NTFS.aspx I have used most of the code given here. The thing is he takes each file name and finds it file reference number and writes it in a database. Then, when the journal pops up, he does a query to match the filereferencenumber. Which is pointless, because this way you are going through the entire filesystem again. –  roymustang86 Sep 17 '11 at 2:34
1  
@roy: I don't think it's pointless. You only need to catalog directories from the MFT. And the journal still gives you an accurate list of changed files, without having to calculate hashes on all file content. How else would you detect changes? (and hashes carry a risk of collision) I assume you know that the "last modified time" isn't trustworthy. –  Ben Voigt Sep 19 '11 at 1:57
    
By pointless, I didn't mean it was not accurate. It takes a long time to query a database to find its matching file reference number. I am trying to cut short on the processing time here. –  roymustang86 Sep 19 '11 at 13:26
    
@roy: Does it a long time to build the database, or query it? If queries are really taking a long time, you need a more efficient data structure. –  Ben Voigt Sep 19 '11 at 15:50
    
yes, it takes a long time to query the database. I will have to think of another way to store the data. –  roymustang86 Sep 19 '11 at 16:37

You can use ReadDirectoryChanges and surrounding windows API.

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Does it detect changes in sub folders too? And, does it need to be constantly running to monitor the changes? Will it give only the changes since last scan? –  roymustang86 Sep 14 '11 at 20:12
    
Yes, if you pass TRUE for parameter 4. You can implement it many ways but it's possible to do real-time monitoring. Read the MSDN article linked for usage ;-) –  AJG85 Sep 14 '11 at 20:23
    
Hey, I just ran a small program to test how this works, but after ReadDurectoryChangesW, it does not go over to the next step. IS this a known issue, am I doing something wrong? Can you please help me with my code? –  roymustang86 Sep 15 '11 at 19:59
    
Ask a new question and post the code you have so far. You can link this question as a reference. Me or some other windows C++ guy will get to it. –  AJG85 Sep 15 '11 at 20:20
    
So, I made another question, and they say that this is not the right API to check what changed since last check. Do you think there is an alternative? –  roymustang86 Sep 15 '11 at 20:51

I know how to achieve this in java. It will help you if you implement Java code inside C++.

In Java you can achieve this using Jnotify API.It looks for changes in sub-directory also.

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