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I wrote the following code to judge whether an expression entered by user has correct sequence of brackets or not, e.g. if user enters [a*(b+c)] its ok. But if he enters [a*(b+c)[ its not correct.

Stacklist.cpp is a file which contains the linked list implementation of stacks and definitions of functions of push and pop. Display is the function which just shows the top entry.

#include<iostream>
#include<exception>
using namespace std;
#include"stacklist.cpp"

int main()
{
string s;
cin>>s;//user inputs the string
stacklist<int> stack1;//the class in stacklist.cpp...int because all bracket's ascii values are ints
char c;

while((c=cin.get())!=EOF)
{

   switch('c')
   {
       case '(': case '{': case '[':
           stack1.push('c');
           break;

       case ')':
           {char s=stack1.display();
              try
              {
                if(s=='(')
                  { stack1.pop();
                   continue;}
                else
                  throw 5;
              }//try block    

              catch(5) //.......(a)
              {
              cout<<"unmatched bracket error";
              exit(-1);
              }//catch over    
           }//')' case 
           break;

        case '}': //.......(b)
           {char s=stack1.display();
              try
               {
               if(s=='{')
                  { stack1.pop();
                  continue;}
               else
                  throw 6;
               }//try block    

              catch(6) //......(a)
               {
                cout<<"unmatched bracket error";
                exit(-1);
               }//catch over    
           }//'}' case
           break;

         case ']': ........(c)
           {char s=stack1.display();
             try
              {
               if(s==']')
                  { stack1.pop();
                  continue;}
               else
                  throw 7;
              }//try block    

             catch(7) //.............(a)
              {
              cout<<"unmatched bracket error";
              exit(-1);
              }//catch over    
           }//']' case  
           break;//..........(d)

         default:
             break;     
    }   //switch 

} //while  

 if(stack1.display==0)//0 is displayed if stack is empty
    cout<<"string is correct"<<endl;
 else
    cout<<"unequal number of brackets"<<endl;

  system("pause"); //........(e)
  return 0; 
}    //main

Now the problem is that when I compiled the code there were various errors:

syntax error before numeric constant.........in all (a)
case label '}' not within switch statement........(b)
case label ']' not within switch statement........(c)
syntax error before break.................(d)
ISO forbids declaration of 'system' with no type...........(e)

Please tell me how to plug these errors?

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Might want to be more consistent with your brace style. –  Marlon Sep 14 '11 at 19:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  • system is found in the header cstdio, but you did not #include that header.

    Anyway, it's best not to use "tricks" like system("pause") to keep the console window after your program ends: if your console environment is not hanging around after your program has finished doing its meaningful work, then that's your console environment's fault/problem and you should configure it properly so that that does not happen. Pausing is not part of your program's job.

  • Catching looks like this:

    catch (Type object-name) { code }
    

    object-name is optional, but Type is not.

    Therefore catch (6) is ill-formed. The other errors are a result of this one: parsing of your program goes all wonky when you write stuff that is not valid C++!

And your indentation is pretty horrendous.

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C++ cannot catch a 5, but C++ can catch an int. Change all instances of catch(5) to catch(int) and that will solve that issue.

Also, on line 60, the ..... isn't commented, and in several places you compare string s to '{' chars instead of "{" strings.

Also, Tomalak Geret'kal noted that you have to #include <cstdlib> for the system and exit calls.

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