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I have the following javascript function which is responsible of togglling some elements in my html page based on the passed parameter:

function toggleDeliveryOption(source) {
    if(source.toLowerCase() === "maildeliveryoption") 
    {
        var fs = document.getElementById("mailDeliveryOptionFS");
    }
    else if(source.toLowerCase() === "faxdeliveryoption")
    {
        var fs = document.getElementById("faxdeliveryoptionFS");
    }
    else if(source.toLowerCase() === "emaildeliveryoption")
    {
        var fs = document.getElementById("emaildeliveryoptionFS");
    }
    if(fs)
    {
        if(fs.style.display == "none")
            fs.style.display = "block";
        else
            fs.style.display = "none"
    }
} 

now the weired behavior is that if source was the first one (maildeliveryoption) it works and fs will holds the element with id mailDeliveryOptionFS, but for other two elements in the 2 other else branches, fs evaluates to null so it doesn't get into the if condition! I think this problem has something to do with variable scope in javascript, but I can't figure out what is the problem

share|improve this question
    
that shouldn't be the problem... how is source set? –  Joseph Marikle Sep 14 '11 at 20:40
    
@Joseph source is passed based on click event for checkbox <input type="checkbox" onclick="toggleDeliveryOption('mailDeliveryOption');" /> Mail –  akram Sep 14 '11 at 20:41
1  
Can you show the HTML as it will be needed? I believe you may have spelled your IDs wrong in the JavaScript Code. IDs are case sensitive. mailDeliveryOptionFS is camel cased where the other two are not. –  John Hartsock Sep 14 '11 at 20:42

3 Answers 3

Perhaps you are not looking for the right ID. IDs are case sensitive, even if you compare the condition with a lower case ID, the real ID will still be camel case (like for the first element, since it's the only one which is being found).

function toggleDeliveryOption( source )
{ 
    var source = source.toLowerCase(),
        id,
        fs;

    switch ( source ) 
    {
        case "maildeliveryoption":
            id = "mailDeliveryOptionFS";
            break;

        case "faxdeliveryoption":
            id = "faxDeliveryOptionFS";
            break;

        case "emaildeliveryoption":
            id = "emailDeliveryOptionFS";
            break;
    }

    fs = document.getElementById( id );

    if ( fs )
    {
        if ( fs.style.display == "none" )
        {
            fs.style.display = "block";
        }
    }
} 
share|improve this answer

Looks good (though using a switch would look nicer). I don't know what these calls are benig used for but you do have a capitalization difference between the first one and latter two. You have "mailDeliveryOptionFS" in beautiful camel case but "faxdeliveryoptionFS" and "emaildeliveryoptionFS" are not. That might be your problem? Change them to "faxDeliveryOptionFS" and "emailDeliveryOptionFS" respectively?

share|improve this answer

Change your code to this to properly declare the local variable fs once. Then, you can reliably test at the end of your code to see if it's been set or not. Your previous code might work due to variable hoisting, but it isn't the recommended way of coding. A variable's scope is the function it's declared in.

function toggleDeliveryOption(source) {
    var fs = null;
    if(source.toLowerCase() === "maildeliveryoption") 
    {
        fs = document.getElementById("mailDeliveryOptionFS");
    }
    else if(source.toLowerCase() === "faxdeliveryoption")
    {
        fs = document.getElementById("faxdeliveryoptionFS");
    }
    else if(source.toLowerCase() === "emaildeliveryoption")
    {
        fs = document.getElementById("emaildeliveryoptionFS");
    }
    if (fs)
    {
        if (fs.style.display == "none") {
            fs.style.display = "block";
        } else {
            fs.style.display = "none";
        }
    }
} 

The other potential gotcha here is that fs.style.display may not be previously set as reading the style variable this way only returns explicit inline styles in the HTML (it does not return things set via CSS). If you want to know the actual state of the display setting, you have to use computed style which will include CSS settings. Getting the computed style is different in windows so it takes a few more lines of code to do that. This is one of the reasons I use a framework like YUI or jQuery because it takes care of all this cross-browser mess for me.

Incidentally, you could simplify the code a lot like this:

function toggleDeliveryOption(source) {
    var fs = document.getElementById(source);
    if (fs) {
        if (fs.style.display == "none") {
            fs.style.display = "block";
        } else {
            fs.style.display = "none";
        }
    }
}

To make this simpler version work, just pass the id of the option to toggle:

toggleDeliveryOption("mailDeliveryOptionFS");

If you want the actual display state including CSS settings, then you would need to use this:

// add IE compatibility function for getComputedStyle
if (!window.getComputedStyle) {
    window.getComputedStyle = function(el, pseudo) {
        this.el = el;
        this.getPropertyValue = function(prop) {
            var re = /(\-([a-z]){1})/g;
            if (prop == 'float') prop = 'styleFloat';
            if (re.test(prop)) {
                prop = prop.replace(re, function () {
                    return arguments[2].toUpperCase();
                });
            }
            return el.currentStyle[prop] ? el.currentStyle[prop] : null;
        }
        return this;
    }
}


function toggleDeliveryOption(source) {
    var fs = document.getElementById(source);
    if (fs) {
        var style = getComputedStyle(fs, null);
        if (style.display == "none") {
            fs.style.display = "block";
        } else {
            fs.style.display = "none";
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Based on the OP, the alternative should be source.toLowerCase() + 'FS', and toggle between 'none' and '' (empty string) rather than block. –  RobG Sep 14 '11 at 21:20
    
source.toLowerCase() + 'FS' doesn't work for all the options like mailDeliveryOptionFS Also setting style.display to an empty string just puts it back to default state, it doesn't guarantee shown or hidden. If that's what you want, the OP can use that, but their original code was setting block or none so that may be what they actually want. –  jfriend00 Sep 14 '11 at 21:47
    
Regarding case, yes, agree. Setting the display property to empty string lets the element adopt the default or inherited display value, setting it to a particular value means knowing what that should be - there are 13 different values and some browsers have different values for the same element (e.g. table cells in IE are block and Firefox table-cell). Setting to block (or any visible value) doesn't guarantee visibility either, since a parent might be hidden or dispalay none. –  RobG Sep 15 '11 at 5:38

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