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I have a property grid that I am using for users to be able to configure objects for any plugin that is written to be used in my application. I would like to be able to tell developers writing plugins to use the ComponentModel Attributes for their members like so:

[CategoryAttribute("On Screen Display Settings"),
 DescriptionAttribute("Whether or not to show the session timer."),
 DisplayName("Show Session Timer")]
 public bool ShowTimer
 {
    get;
    set;
 }

This works great. Now I would like for the members of an enumeration to be able to be edited as well. i.e.

public enum Resolution_ : byte
{
    DCIF,
    CIF,
    QCIF,
    [DisplayName("4CIF")]
    CIF4,
    [DisplayName("2CIF")]
    CIF2
}

So that they are displayed in the PropertyGrid's list like so:

 DCIF
 CIF
 QCIF
 CIF4
 CIF2

Along with any Descriptions and Display names they may have with them.

It seems that I can only do this with properties, events, and methods. Does anyone know how I can do this for an enumeration?

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You will have to make an EnumConverter class and decorate your property with a TypeConverter attribute in order to do this. See this Using PropertyGrid in .NET, it's a nice example.

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Thanks! that was it. I don't know why, but an hour with Google and I still didn't find that article. –  Jonathan Henson Sep 14 '11 at 20:54
    
Nice, I haven't come across EnumConverter in my battles with the PropertyGrid before. –  lee-m Sep 14 '11 at 21:02
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The answer I gave here Has a working example of this. Here is the specific code from that example that you want:

/// <summary>
/// This attribute is used to represent a string value
/// for a value in an enum.
/// </summary>
public class StringValueAttribute : Attribute {

    #region Properties

    /// <summary>
    /// Holds the stringvalue for a value in an enum.
    /// </summary>
    public string StringValue { get; protected set; }

    #endregion

    #region Constructor

    /// <summary>
    /// Constructor used to init a StringValue Attribute
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    public StringValueAttribute(string value) {
        this.StringValue = value;
    }

    #endregion

}

public static class MyExtension
{
    public static string GetStringValue(this Enum value)
    {
        // Get the type
        Type type = value.GetType();

        // Get fieldinfo for this type
        FieldInfo fieldInfo = type.GetField(value.ToString());

        // Get the stringvalue attributes
        StringValueAttribute[] attribs = fieldInfo.GetCustomAttributes(
            typeof(StringValueAttribute), false) as StringValueAttribute[];

        // Return the first if there was a match.
        return attribs.Length > 0 ? attribs[0].StringValue : null;
    }

    public static String[] GetEnumNames(Type t)
    {
        Array enumValueArray= Enum.GetValues(t);

        string[] enumStrings = new String[enumValueArray.Length];
        for(int i = 0; i< enumValueArray.Length; ++i)
        {
            enumStrings[i] = GetStringValue((test)enumValueArray.GetValue(i));
        }

        return enumStrings;
    }
}

enum test
{
    [StringValue("test ONE")]
    test1,
    [StringValue("test TWO")]
    test2
}
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You can attach a custom TypeConverter implementation to the property whose type is your enumeration and override the GetStandardValuesSupported and GetStandardValues to return a custom list of items to show in the drop-down list in the PropertyGrid. You can then override ConvertFrom/ConvertTo methods to handle converting values to/from your enumeration type.

You may also want to override GetStandardValuesExclusive and have it return "true" so the user can't type anything into the property value.

So, something like this:

public class MyTypeConverter : TypeConverter
{
  //Override GetStandardValuesExclusive, 
  //GetStandardValues and GetStandardValuesSupported
}

public class SomeClass
{
   [TypeConverter(typeof(MyTypeConverter))]
   public Resolution SomePropertry
   {
      ...
   }
}

In your implementation of GetStandardValues/ConvertFrom/ConvertTo you could then use Reflection to pull out the DisplayNameAttribute (or DescriptionAttribute, which may be more suited to this task) attributes of the various enum members to show that text instead of hard-coding the list of items to show.

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This also seems to work:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Field)]
public class EnumDisplayNameAttribute : System.ComponentModel.DisplayNameAttribute
{
    public EnumDisplayNameAttribute(string data) : base(data) { }
}

public enum Resolution_ : byte
{
    DCIF,
    CIF,
    QCIF,
    [EnumDisplayName("4CIF")]
    CIF4,
    [EnumDisplayName("2CIF")]
    CIF2
}

Components looking for a DisplayName attribute via Reflection will find one, and as far as I can tell this works. Is there a reason why this might be a bad idea?

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I like the simplicity of this idea, but unfortunately it didn't work for me (I'm creating Visual Studio options pages, though, not vanilla PropertyGrids). –  Cameron Nov 12 '13 at 18:06
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