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I have the following MySQL scripts:

CREATE TABLE user_roles (
  id INT AUTO_INCREMENT,
  PRIMARY KEY(id),
  name TEXT NOT NULL,
  access INT NOT NULL DEFAULT '0'
)
CREATE TABLE users (
    id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    PRIMARY KEY (id),
    name TEXT NOT NULL,
    email TEXT NOT NULL,
    password TEXT NOT NULL,
    date_created DATETIME,
    roles VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
    active INT DEFAULT '1',
    FOREIGN KEY(roles) REFERENCES user_roles(id)
)

It keeps giving me error 150. Maybe the database isn't well planned? Any help will be greatly appreciated.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The data types of your users.roles and user_roles.id columns must be the same for the FOREIGN KEY constraint to work correctly. Instead try making users.roles an INT:

CREATE TABLE users (
    id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    PRIMARY KEY (id),
    name TEXT NOT NULL,
    email TEXT NOT NULL,
    password TEXT NOT NULL,
    date_created DATETIME,
    -- Change this...
    roles INT NOT NULL,
    active INT DEFAULT '1',
    FOREIGN KEY(roles) REFERENCES user_roles(id)
)

UPDATE According to comments, users.roles should be text like "admin, moderator, etc." For correct data normalization, user_roles.id should be keyed against and to get the text name of the role, JOIN them in queries.

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Ok. This scripts were given in SQL form by a friend of mine and by roles he means something like admin,moderator,user and etc...I know that if I change the types it will work. This field should contain text information –  George Sep 14 '11 at 21:05
1  
@George if that's the case, id is not the right column to key against. It may be user_roles.text, but then that column should probably be a VARCHAR() rather than TEXT –  Michael Berkowski Sep 14 '11 at 21:07
1  
@George For correct normalization, id should be used though, and use a JOIN in queries to retrieve the text name of the role. –  Michael Berkowski Sep 14 '11 at 21:09
    
This wasn't entirely written by myself. Yes it should be called access-levels –  George Sep 14 '11 at 21:10
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You need to separate your statements with a semicolon and use INTS instead of strings:

CREATE TABLE user_roles (
  id INT AUTO_INCREMENT,
  PRIMARY KEY(id),
  name TEXT NOT NULL,
  access INT NOT NULL DEFAULT 0
);
CREATE TABLE users (
    id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    PRIMARY KEY (id),
    name TEXT NOT NULL,
    email TEXT NOT NULL,
    password TEXT NOT NULL,
    date_created DATETIME,
    roles VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
    active INT DEFAULT 1,
    FOREIGN KEY(roles) REFERENCES user_roles(id)
);
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Tested, this works. –  Maverick Sep 14 '11 at 21:10
    
#1005 - Can't create table 'main.users' (errno: 150) –  George Sep 14 '11 at 21:13
1  
Weird, I just ran the SQL and it worked fine for me. What version of MySQL are you running? –  AlienWebguy Sep 14 '11 at 21:23
    
MySQL version 5.5.8 –  George Sep 14 '11 at 21:28
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