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I've recently started using Unity for dependency injections in .net. I was under the impression that a Unity Container would most likely be a singleton or static member of a class. I saw another developer using it in a request handler that will receive a lot of traffic.

Is there some magic happening that keeps the cost low for creating a new Unity Container every time, or should this code be re-factored to only create the Unity container once?

This code is part of the implementing class of a .svc Service.

public string DoSomeWork(Request request)
{
   var container = new UnityContainer().LoadConfiguration("MyContainer");
   var handler = container.Resolve<RequestHandler>();
   return handler.Handle(request);
}
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You usually create your DI container at your composition root. Not because this is expensive, but just because it makes sense in grand DI scheme of things. Doing bindings outside of composition root usually leads to worse design. –  zespri Sep 14 '11 at 21:57
    
I should have clarified this code is used to implement a Service (.svc file). I don't know that Unity could be directly used as part of the .svc. –  ScArcher2 Sep 14 '11 at 22:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not 100% sure with Unity, but with most IoC containers, the creation of the container and especially the loading of container configuration is a reasonably expensive operation.

I have to question why this developer is utilizing the container in this manner however. Ideally the IoC container shouldn't even be a static or singleton object - it should be instantiated only to resolve the top level object of your dependency tree, and the rest of the objects in your application should be constructed automatically through dependency injection. In the case of your example, the class containing that method ideally would have the RequestHandler (ideally an interface of this) injected into it through the constructor so that class does not need to know about the IoC container.

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I should have clarified this code is used to implement a Service (.svc file). I don't know that Unity could be directly used as part of the .svc. –  ScArcher2 Sep 14 '11 at 21:58

This is not the right way to use an IOC container - basically your are using it as a service locator, but this will cause dependencies to the IOC container to be sprinkled all over the code base.

What you should do is have one central spot in your codebase where all dependencies are resolved and then use dependency injection (DI) to propagate the resolved concrete classes down the chain, i.e via constructor injection. So your class really should look something like this:

public class Foo
{
    private readonly IRequestHandler _handler;

    public Foo(IRequestHandler handler)
    {
        _handler = handler;
    }

    public string DoSomeWork(Request request)
    {
        return _handler.Handle(request);
    }
}
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I should have clarified this code is used to implement a Service (.svc file). I don't know that Unity could be directly used as part of the .svc. –  ScArcher2 Sep 14 '11 at 21:59

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