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I'm trying to match a regular expression in Perl. My code looks like the following:

my $source = "Hello_[version]; Goodbye_[version]";
my $pattern = "Hello_[version]";
if ($source =~ m/$pattern/) {
  print "Match found!"
}

The problem arises in that brackets indicate a character class (or so I read) when Perl tries to match the regex, and the match ends up failing. I know that I can escape the brackets with \[ or \], but that would require another block of code to go through the string and search for the brackets. Is there a way to have the brackets automatically ignored without escaping them individually?

Quick note: I can't just add the backslash, as this is just an example. In my real code, $source and $pattern are both coming from outside the Perl code (either URIEncoded or from a file).

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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You are using the Wrong Tool for the job.

You do not have a pattern! There are NO regex characters in $pattern!

You have a literal string.

index() is for working with literal strings...

my $source = "Hello_[version]; Goodbye_[version]";
my $pattern = "Hello_[version]";
if ( index($source, $pattern) != -1 ) {
    print "Match found!";
}
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+1 For using index() –  sln Sep 15 '11 at 16:57
    
What exactly is a "regex character"? I was under the impression that a regex is just a means of matching strings or patterns in strings, not a specific set of characters, unless there's another meaning to it that I'm not aware of? Though, thanks for index(). I'll give that a shot when I'm at my server tomorrow; I do think that index() will work better and be cleaner than regex matching. –  CoV Sep 16 '11 at 4:14
    
"regex character" was a typo, I meant to write "regex metacharacter". –  tadmc Sep 18 '11 at 21:42
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Quoting a $pattern defeats the purpose of Regular Expressions unless its being used as a known literal and being dumped into a real regex.

edit
Otherwise, just use index() to find the position of the substring. With that information just use substr() to extract surrounding data if necessary.

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use substr() for what? –  tadmc Sep 14 '11 at 21:58
    
I would use index() to get the position, then substr() (optionally) to extract residual data. –  sln Sep 15 '11 at 16:55
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\Q will disable metacharacters until \E is found:

http://www.anaesthetist.com/mnm/perl/Findex.htm

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Thanks! I knew it was simple solution, that worked perfectly! –  CoV Sep 14 '11 at 21:54
    
Changed my "accepted answer", sorry, but while yours worked fine, I think index() was really what I was looking for. Thanks though! –  CoV Sep 16 '11 at 15:53
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Use quotemeta():

my $source = "Hello_[version]; Goodbye_[version]";
my $pattern = quotemeta("Hello_[version]");
if ($source =~ m/$pattern/) {
  print "Match found!"
}
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