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What is the precise difference between encapsulation and abstraction?

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24 Answers 24

A priori, they've got nothing in common.

Most answers here focus on OOP but encapsulation begins much earlier; every method is an encapsulation:

point x = { 1, 4 };
point y = { 23, 42 };

int d = distance(x, y);

Here, distance encapsulates the calculation of the (euclidean) distance between two points in a plane: it hides implementation details. This is encapsulation, pure and simple.

Abstraction is the process of generalization: taking a concrete implementation and making it applicable to different, albeit somewhat related, types of data. The classical example of abstraction is C's qsort function which sorts data.

The thing about qsort is that it doesn't care about the data it sorts – in fact, it doesn't know what data it sorts. Rather, its input type is a typeless pointer (void*) which is just C's way of saying “I don't care about the type of data” (this is also called type erasure). The important point is that the implementation of qsort always stays the same, regardless of data type. The only thing that has to change is the compare function, which differs from data type to data type. qsort therefore expects the user to provide said compare function as a function argument.

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3  
Though every method is an encapsulation, it is also an abstraction, because every time you put some things together and give it a name you create a new (abstract) concept. Encapsulation without abstraction is useless. Therefore it is not true that they've got nothing in common. –  proskor Jan 27 at 21:12
    
@proskor I maintain that the concepts are orthogonal even if their domains overlap. It may even be true that every encapsulation is-an abstraction (although I’m not convinced) – but even then I think that this would be incidental rather than an inherent property of either concept. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 27 at 22:52
1  
They are distinct, but not orthogonal. In fact, I do think that encapsulation is indeed a special kind of abstraction, namely a structural one. By considering something compound as a whole we basically ignore (abstract from) the details of how it is built up of something else, i.e. ignore its internal structure. –  proskor Jan 28 at 0:27

Encapsulation is hiding the implementation details which may or may not be for generic or specialized behavior(s).

Abstraction is providing a generalization (say, over a set of behaviors).

Here's a good read: Abstraction, Encapsulation, and Information Hiding by Edward V. Berard of the Object Agency.

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5  
+1 for your answer and reminding me of Douglas Adams with your nickname. :) –  Zeemee Jul 6 '11 at 13:58
5  
404 at link, you might wanna go at Abstraction, Encapsulation and Information hiding –  Neha Choudhary Mar 31 '13 at 7:24
2  
Neha's link also broken now, but yeh. we can always google the article name. this is the one i stumbled upon tonymarston.co.uk/php-mysql/abstraction.txt –  abhijeet apsunde Jul 29 '13 at 10:33

encapsulation puts some things in a box and gives you a peephole; this keeps you from mucking with the gears.

abstraction flat-out ignores the details that don't matter, like whether the things have gears, ratchets, flywheels, or nuclear cores; they just "go"

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3  
Why was this downvoted? It's one of the only correct descriptions in this big sea of wrong answers. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 13 '09 at 11:47
1  
In the encapsulation by only providing the peephole, haven't we ignored the details that don't matter to user- this is what the abstraction is[as said by you]. How the two things are different? May be you can elaborate more. –  Sanjeev Kumar Dangi Nov 2 '10 at 14:29
29  
@Sanjeev encapsulation is concrete, abstraction is...abstract! ;-) encapsulation is an object you can use, abstraction is an ideal you can only discuss. encapsulation is why you wear underwear, abstraction is how you explain the difference between underwear and swimsuits –  Steven A. Lowe Nov 2 '10 at 15:53
  • Abstraction lets you focus on what the object does instead of how it does it
  • Encapsulation means hiding the internal details or mechanics of how an object does something.

Like when you drive a car, you know what the gas pedal does but you may not know the process behind it because it is encapsulated.

Let me give an example in C#. Suppose you have an integer:

int Number = 5;
string aStrNumber = Number.ToString();

you can use a method like Number.ToString() which returns you characters representation of the number 5, and stores that in a string object. The method tells you what it does instead of how it does it.

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I almost upvoted this for the short, precise answer, but then I saw that car metaphore again which make me puke - Oh well, Im a nice guy :P +1 –  cwap Apr 12 '09 at 20:26
    
Sorry buddy hehe, I added a better explanation. –  jasonco Apr 12 '09 at 20:35
    
So, functions in C also Abstraction? –  Reddy Aug 23 '10 at 11:28
    
Abstractions can be built regardless of the language or paradigm being used. In a short answer, YES, there can be abstractions in C. Why not? –  jasonco Sep 7 '10 at 22:34
4  
Your definitions of both abstraction and encapsulation are same. This is what i understand - how it is done is hidden and what is done is exposed. In your example of car and Number.ToString(), could you precisely point out what is abstraction and encapsulation? This will help in clearing the things. –  Sanjeev Kumar Dangi Nov 2 '10 at 14:26

Encapsulation: Is hiding unwanted/un-expected/propriety implementation details from the actual users of object. e.g.

List<string> list = new List<string>();
list.Sort(); /* Here, which sorting algorithm is used and hows its 
implemented is not useful to the user who wants to perform sort, that's 
why its hidden from the user of list. */

Abstraction: Is a way of providing generalization and hence a common way to work with objects of vast diversity. e.g.

class Aeroplane : IFlyable, IFuelable, IMachine
{ // Aeroplane's Design says:
  // Aeroplane is a flying object
  // Aeroplane can be fueled
  // Aeroplane is a Machine
}
// But the code related to Pilot, or Driver of Aeroplane is not bothered 
// about Machine or Fuel. Hence,
// pilot code:
IFlyable flyingObj = new Aeroplane();
flyingObj.Fly();
// fighter Pilot related code
IFlyable flyingObj2 = new FighterAeroplane();
flyingObj2.Fly();
// UFO related code 
IFlyable ufoObj = new UFO();
ufoObj.Fly();
// **All the 3 Above codes are genaralized using IFlyable,
// Interface Abstraction**
// Fly related code knows how to fly, irrespective of the type of 
// flying object they are.

// Similarly, Fuel related code:
// Fueling an Aeroplane
IFuelable fuelableObj = new Aeroplane();
fuelableObj.FillFuel();
// Fueling a Car
IFuelable fuelableObj2 = new Car(); // class Car : IFuelable { }
fuelableObj2.FillFuel();

// ** Fueling code does not need know what kind of vehicle it is, so far 
// as it can Fill Fuel**
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Abstraction: Only necessary information is shown. Let's focus on the example of switching on a computer. The user does not have to know what goes on while the system is still loading (that information is hidden from the user).

Let's take another example, that of the ATM. The customer does not need to know how the machine reads the PIN and processes the transaction, all he needs to do is enter the PIN, take the cash and leave.

Encapsulation: Deals with hiding the sensitive data of a clas hence privatising part of it. It is a way of keeping some information private to its clients by allowing no access to it from outside.

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1  
I think "way of keeping information private" is information hiding. Encapsulation is just wrapping information, that may be private or public. –  KisHan SarsecHa Gajjar Feb 1 at 17:16

Another example:

Suppose I created an immutable Rectangle class like this:

class Rectangle {
 public:
  Rectangle(int width, int height) : width_(width), height_(height) {}
  int width() const { return width_; }
  int height() const { return height_; }

 private:
  int width_;
  int height_;
}

Now it's obvious that I've encapsulated width and height (access is somehow restricted), but I've not abstracted anything (okay, maybe I've ignored where the rectangle is located in the coordinates space, but this is a flaw of the example).

Good abstraction usually implies good encapsulation.

An example of good abstraction is a generic database connection class. Its public interface is database-agnostic, and is very simple, yet allows me to do what I want with the connection. And you see? There's also encapsulation there, because the class must have all the low-level handles and calls inside.

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Abstraction: The idea of presenting something in a simplified / different way, which is either easier to understand and use or more pertinent to the situation.

Consider a class that sends an email... it uses abstraction to show itself to you as some kind of messenger boy, so you can call emailSender.send(mail, recipient). What it actually does - chooses POP3 / SMTP, calling servers, MIME translation, etc, is abstracted away. You only see your messenger boy.

Encapsulation: The idea of securing and hiding data and methods that are private to an object. It deals more with making something independent and foolproof.

Take me, for instance. I encapsulate my heart rate from the rest of the world. Because I don't want anyone else changing that variable, and I don't need anyone else to set it in order for me to function. Its vitally important to me, but you don't need to know what it is, and you probably don't care anyway.

Look around you'll find that almost everything you touch is an example of both abstraction and encapsulation. Your phone, for instance presents to you the abstraction of being able to take what you say and say it to someone else - covering up GSM, processor architecture, radio frequencies, and a million other things you don't understand or care to. It also encapsulates certain data from you, like serial numbers, ID numbers, frequencies, etc.

It all makes the world a nicer place to live in :D

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A mechanism that prevents the data of a particular objects safe from intentional or accidental misuse by external functions is called "data Encapsulation"

The act of representing essential features without including the background details or explanations is known as abstraction

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encapsulation means-hiding data like using getter and setter etc.

Abstraction means- hiding implementation using abstract class and interfaces etc.

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Encapsulation is wrapping up complexity in one capsule that is class & hence Encapsulation… While abstraction is the characteristics of an object which differentiates from other object...

Abstraction can be achieved by making class abstract having one or more methods abstract. Which is nothing but the characteristic which should be implemented by the class extending it. e.g. when you inventing/designing a car you define a characteristics like car should have 4 doors, break, steering wheel etc… so anyone uses this design should include this characteristics. Implementation is not the head each of abstraction. It will just define characteristics which should be included.

Encapsulation is achieved keeping data and the behaviour in one capsule that is class & by making use of access modifiers like public, private, protected along with inheritance, aggregation or composition. So you only show only required things, that too, only to the extent you want to show. i.e. public, protected, friendly & private ka funda…… e.g. GM decides to use the abstracted design of car above. But they have various products having the same characteristics & doing almost same functionality. So they write a class which extends the above abstract class. It says how gear box should work, how break should work, how steering wheel should work. Then all the products just use this common functionality. They need not know how the gear box works or break works or steering wheal works. Indivisual product can surely have more features like a/c or auto lock etc…..

Both are powerful; but using abstraction require more skills than encapsulation and bigger applications/products can not survive with out abstraction.

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"using abstraction require more skills than encapsulation"? Citation needed. –  Johnsyweb Feb 27 '13 at 8:32

Abstraction and Encapsulation by using a single generalized example

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We all use calculator for calculation of complex problems !

image

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1  
@NehaChoudhary, I think you mean to say Your both example tell about just encapsulation, not abstraction; cause abstraction has nothing to do with hiding rather Generalizing –  Rahul Apr 28 at 0:42
    
@Rahul Now, I don't think both of them even explain encapsulation! –  Neha Choudhary Sep 29 at 9:55
    
@Devrath If you want to tell abstraction using calulcator you might wanna go like this: There is an abstract concept of Calculator which calculates which is generalized and can be used as a base concept to make different kinds of calculator. For example, BasicCalculator and ScientificCalculator, both implementing there own ways of calculations but in the end fulfilling the criteria of generalized Calculator. –  Neha Choudhary Sep 29 at 10:03

A lot of good answers are provided above but I am going to present my(Java) viewpoint here.

Data Encapsulation simply means wrapping and controlling access of logically grouped data in a class. It is generally associated with another keyword - Data Hiding. This is achieved in Java using access modifiers.

A simple example would be defining a private variable and giving access to it using getter and setter methods or making a method private as it's only use is withing the class. There is no need for user to know about these methods and variables.

Note : It should not be misunderstood that encapsulation is all about data hiding only. When we say encapsulation, emphasis should be on grouping or packaging or bundling related data and behavior together.

Data Abstraction on the other hand is concept of generalizing so that the underneath complex logic is not exposed to the user. In Java this is achieved by using interfaces and abstract classes.

Example -

Lets say we have an interface Animal and it has a function makeSound(). There are two concrete classes Dog and Cat that implement this interface. These concrete classes have separate implementations of makeSound() function. Now lets say we have a animal(We get this from some external module). All user knows is that the object that it is receiving is some Animal and it is the users responsibility to print the animal sound. One brute force way is to check the object received to identify it's type, then typecast it to that Animal type and then call makeSound() on it. But a neater way is to abstracts thing out. Use Animal as a polymorphic reference and call makeSound() on it. At runtime depending on what the real Object type is proper function will be invoked.

More details here.

enter image description here

Complex logic is in the circuit board which is encapsulated in a touchpad and a nice interface(buttons) is provided to abstract it out to the user.

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Lets take the example of a stack. It could be implemented using an array or a linked list. But the operations it supports are push and pop. Now abstraction is exposing only the interfaces push and pop. The underlying representation is hidden(is it an array or is it a linked list?) and a well defined interface is provided. Now how do you ensure that no accidental access is made to the abstracted data? That is where the Encapsulation comes in. For e.g classes in C++ use the access specifiers which ensure that accidental access and modification is prevented. And also by making the above mentioned interfaces as public, it ensures that the only way to manipulate the stack is through the well defined interface. In the process, it has coupled the data and the code that can manipulate it. ( Lets not get the friend functions involved here.). That is the code and data are bonded together or tied or encapsulated

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Information hiding is not strictly required for abstraction or encapsulation. Information might be ignored, but does not have to be hidden.

Encapsulation is the ability to treat something as a single thing, even though it may be composed of many complex parts or ideas. For example, I can say that I'm sitting in a "chair" rather than referring to the many various parts of that chair each with a specific design and function, all fitting together precisely for the purpose of comfortably holding my butt a few feet away from the floor.

Abstraction is enabled by encapsulation. Because we encapsulate objects, we can think about them as things which relate to each other in some way rather than getting bogged down in the subtle details of internal object structure. Abstraction is the ability to consider the bigger picture, removed from concern over little details. The root of the word is abstract as in the summary that appears at the top of a scholarly paper, not abstract as in a class which can only be instantiated as a derived subclass.

I can honestly say that when I plop my butt down in my chair, I never think about how the structure of that chair will catch and hold my weight. It's a decent enough chair that I don't have to worry about those details. So I can turn my attention toward my computer. And again, I don't think about the component parts of my computer. I'm just looking at a part of a webpage that represents a text area that I can type in, and I'm communicating in words, barely even thinking about how my fingers always find the right letters so quickly on the keyboard, and how the connection is ultimately made between tapping these keys and posting to this forum. This is the great power of abstraction. Because the lower levels of the system can be trusted to work with consistency and precision, we have attention to spare for greater work.

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class Aeroplane : IFlyable, IFuelable, IMachine
{ // Aeroplane's Design says:
  // Aeroplane is a flying object
  // Aeroplane can be fueled
  // Aeroplane is a Machine
}
// But the code related to Pilot, or Driver of Aeroplane is not bothered 
// about Machine or Fuel. Hence,
// pilot code:
IFlyable flyingObj = new Aeroplane();
flyingObj.Fly();
// fighter Pilot related code
IFlyable flyingObj2 = new FighterAeroplane();
flyingObj2.Fly();
// UFO related code 
IFlyable ufoObj = new UFO();
ufoObj.Fly();
// **All the 3 Above codes are genaralized using IFlyable,
// Interface Abstraction**
// Fly related code knows how to fly, irrespective of the type of 
// flying object they are.

// Similarly, Fuel related code:
// Fueling an Aeroplane
IFuelable fuelableObj = new Aeroplane();
fuelableObj.FillFuel();
// Fueling a Car
IFuelable fuelableObj2 = new Car(); // class Car : IFuelable { }
fuelableObj2.FillFuel();

// ** Fueling code does not need know what kind of vehicle it is, so far 
// as it can Fill Fuel**
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abstraction is hiding non useful data from users and encapsulation is bind together data into a capsule (a class). I think encapsulation is way that we achieve abstraction.

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From this

Difference between Encapsulation and Abstraction in OOPS

Abstraction and Encapsulation are two important Object Oriented Programming (OOPS) concepts. Encapsulation and Abstraction both are interrelated terms.

Real Life Difference Between Encapsulation and Abstraction

Encapsulate means to hide. Encapsulation is also called data hiding.You can think Encapsulation like a capsule (medicine tablet) which hides medicine inside it. Encapsulation is wrapping, just hiding properties and methods. Encapsulation is used for hide the code and data in a single unit to protect the data from the outside the world. Class is the best example of encapsulation.

Abstraction refers to showing only the necessary details to the intended user. As the name suggests, abstraction is the "abstract form of anything". We use abstraction in programming languages to make abstract class. Abstract class represents abstract view of methods and properties of class.

Implementation Difference Between Encapsulation and Abstraction

  1. Abstraction is implemented using interface and abstract class while Encapsulation is implemented using private and protected access modifier.

  2. OOPS makes use of encapsulation to enforce the integrity of a type (i.e. to make sure data is used in an appropriate manner) by preventing programmers from accessing data in a non-intended manner. Through encapsulation, only a predetermined group of functions can access the data. The collective term for datatypes and operations (methods) bundled together with access restrictions (public/private, etc.) is a class.

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Difference Between Abstraction and Encapsulation.

Difference between Abstraction and Encapsulation

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Encapsulation require modularity. It requires you to create objects that has the data and the methods to process the data. In this case you can view it as a module.

Abstraction provides you a generalized view of your classes.

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One could argue that abstraction is a technique that helps us identify which specific information should be visible, and which information should be hidden. Encapsulation is then the technique for packaging the information in such a way as to hide what should be hidden, and make visible what is intended to be visible.

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I Think Encapsulation is a way to implement abstraction. Have a look at the following link.

Abstraction and Encapsulation

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The process of Abstraction and Encapsulation both generate interfaces.

An interface generated via encapsulation hides implementation details.

An interface generated via abstraction becomes applicable to more data types, compared to before abstraction.

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I will try to demonstrate Encapsulation in a simple way.. Lets see..

  • The wrapping up of data and functions into a single unit (called class) is known as encapsulation. Encapsulation containing and hiding information about an object, such as internal data structures and code.

Encapsulation is -

  • Hiding Complexity,
  • Binding Data and Function together,
  • Making Complicated Method's Private,
  • Making Instance Variable's Private,
  • Hiding Unnecessary Data and Functions from End User.

Encapsulation implements Abstraction.

And Abstraction is -

  • Showing Whats Necessary,
  • Data needs to abstract from End User,

Lets see an example-

The below Image shows a GUI of "Customer Details to be ADD-ed into a Database".

Customer Screen GUI

By looking at the Image we can say that we need a Customer Class.

Step - 1: What does my Customer Class needs?

i.e.

  • 2 variables to store Customer Code and Customer Name.
  • 1 Function to Add the Customer Code and Customer Name into Database.

    namespace CustomerContent { public class Customer { public string CustomerCode = ""; public string CustomerName = ""; public void ADD() { //my DB code will go here }

Now only ADD method wont work here alone.

Step -2: How will the validation work, ADD Function act?

We will need Database Connection code and Validation Code (Extra Methods).

public bool Validate()
{
    //Granular Customer Code and Name
    return true;
}

public bool CreateDBObject()
{
    //DB Connection Code
    return true;
}


class Program
{
static void main(String[] args)
{
CustomerComponent.Customer obj = new CustomerComponent.Customer;

obj.CustomerCode = "s001";
obj.CustomerName = "Mac";

obj.Validate();
obj.CreateDBObject();

obj.ADD();
}
}

Now there is no need of showing the Extra Methods(Validate(); CreateDBObject() [Complicated and Extra method] ) to the End User.End user only needs to see and know about Customer Code, Customer Name and ADD button which will ADD the record.. End User doesn't care about HOW it will ADD the Data to Database?.

Step -3: Private the extra and complicated methods which doesn't involves End User's Interaction.

So making those Complicated and Extra method as Private instead Public(i.e Hiding those methods) and deleting the obj.Validate(); obj.CreateDBObject(); from main in class Program we achieve Encapsulation.

In other words Simplifying Interface to End User is Encapsulation.

So now the code looks like as below -

namespace CustomerContent
{
public class Customer
{
public string CustomerCode = "";
public string CustomerName = "";
public void ADD()
{
   //my DB code will go here
}

private bool Validate()
{
    //Granular Customer Code and Name
    return true;
}

private bool CreateDBObject()
{
    //DB Connection Code
    return true;
}


class Program
{
static void main(String[] args)
{
CustomerComponent.Customer obj = new CustomerComponent.Customer;

obj.CustomerCode = "s001";

obj.CustomerName = "Mac";

obj.ADD();
}
}

Summary :

Step -1: What does my Customer Class needs? is Abstraction.

Step -3: Step -3: Private the extra and complicated methods which doesn't involves End User's Interaction is Encapsulation.

P.S. - The code above is hard and fast.

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