Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two functions in a class (please comment on the issue and not the coding style):

template <typename T>
class myStringClass
{
public:
  ...

  typedef T* iterator;

  void erase(size_t pos, size_t n); // FUNC#1
  void erase(iterator first, iterator last); //FUNC#2
};

FUNC#2 is erasing the range while FUNC#1 simply calls FUNC#2 after calculating the appropriate range. In FUNC#1 instead of declaring iterator to calculate the range, I declared T* which is (should be?) essentially the same thing.

// SEGMENT#1 in function erase(size_t pos, size_t n)
T* begin = m_begin + pos;
T* end = begin + n;
erase(begin, end); // call FUNC#2

However, this does not compile. The compiler complains that it cannot convert T* (where T is a char) to size_t (i.e. trying to call `FUNC#1). But if I change the above code to:

// SEGMENT#2 in function erase(size_t pos, size_t n)
iterator begin = m_begin + pos;
iterator end = begin + n;
erase(begin, end); // call FUNC#2

Then the compiler is happy. I assumed that typedef was an alias and was not type-checked. So SEGMENT#1 == SEGMENT#1 as far as the compiler is concerned? Why does one compile and the other doesn't?


EDIT: After testing Oli's code, I checked it against mine and I forgot to add const to the iterators in SEGMENT#2. Aside from the argument that adding const does not make sense in this case, why does that produce the error for T* and not iterator. Here is Oli's code slightly modified if you want to give it a try:

#include <stdlib.h>

template <typename T>
class myStringClass
{
private:
  T *m_begin;

public:

  typedef T* iterator;

  void erase(size_t pos, size_t n); // FUNC#1
  void erase(iterator first, iterator last); //FUNC#2
};


template <typename T>
void myStringClass<T>::erase(size_t pos, size_t n)
{
  const T* begin = m_begin + pos; // replace with iterator to compile
  const T* end = begin + n; // replace with iterator to compile
  erase(begin, end); // call the overload
}


template <typename T>
void myStringClass<T>::erase(const iterator first, const iterator last)
{
}

int main(void)
{
  myStringClass<char> x;
  x.erase(1,1);
}
share|improve this question
    
Perhaps you can add what compiler you use? –  orlp Sep 14 '11 at 23:16
    
@Samaursa: See my updated answer. –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 14 '11 at 23:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The following code compiles fine:

#include <stdlib.h>

template <typename T>
class myStringClass
{
private:
  T *m_begin;

public:

  typedef T* iterator;

  void erase(size_t pos, size_t n); // FUNC#1
  void erase(iterator first, iterator last); //FUNC#2
};


template <typename T>
void myStringClass<T>::erase(size_t pos, size_t n)
{
    T* begin = m_begin + pos;
    T* end = begin + n;
    erase(begin, end); // call the overload
}


template <typename T>
void myStringClass<T>::erase(iterator first, iterator last)
{
}


int main(void)
{
    myStringClass<char> x;
    x.erase(1,1);
}

Your problem must be elsewhere.

UPDATE

Now you've shown your real code...

The problem is you're trying to call a function that takes non-const pointers by passing it const pointers. This isn't valid.

UPDATE 2

Now that you've shown your "real real" code...

The problem is that this:

typedef T *U;
const U x;

is not the same as:

const T *x;

it's actually the same as:

T *const x;
share|improve this answer
    
@Sjoerd: "0" is a bad choice, because it leads to an ambiguity. But x.erase(1,1) is fine; see my updated question in a few seconds... –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 14 '11 at 23:24
    
@Oli: Please check my latest edit. –  Samaursa Sep 14 '11 at 23:32
    
@Oli: (With regards to new edit) My apologies. I keep messing it up. If you change the function with iterators to take in const, that would make the code valid but it will fail to compile with T* but will compile with iterator. Btw, even with the invalid code as you mentioned, it still compiles (try it), which was surprising to me as well. –  Samaursa Sep 14 '11 at 23:36
2  
@Samaursa: Ok, I've updated again. In future, please post your exact, actual code when you write your questions... –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 14 '11 at 23:39
    
I will. Again, my apologies. I wanted to simplify it for the sake of the question but next time I will make an example like you did. –  Samaursa Sep 14 '11 at 23:42

It produces the error for const T * and not for const iterator. And the reason is that const iterator expands to T * const, not const T *.

extern int foo(int i);
extern int bar(int *i);

void baz()
{
   const int x = 5;
   int y = x;
   foo(x); // Perfectly fine
   foo(y); // Also perfectly fine
   bar(&x); // Not fine at all.
   bar(&y); // Perfectly fine.
}

void bouncy()
{
   typedef int my_t;
   typedef int *myptr_t;
   typedef const my_t const_my_t; // const (int) aka const int
   typedef const myptr_t const_myptr_t; // const (int *) aka int * const
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.