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Why does the following code, produce the following output?

UPDATING MY CODE TO THIS: i get basically the same thing.

#ifdef _WIN32
    #include <windows.h>
    #include <direct.h>
    #define GetCurrentDir _getcwd
#else
    #include <unistd.h>
    #define GetCurrentDir getcwd
#endif

//==============================MAIN=======================================
#ifdef _WIN32   
    int main(int argc, char **argv) 
    {
        char *path = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*FILENAME_MAX);
        GetCurrentDir(path, sizeof(path));
        printf("path: %s\n", path);
        //other stuff
    }

//==============================END========================================

OUTPUT path : -

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It's difficult to say, because you haven't posted your actual code. Have you tried stepping through in a debugger? –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 14 '11 at 23:48
    
This is my actual code, copy pasted right out of my program. –  Newbie Sep 14 '11 at 23:48
    
Ok, I see you've now added the printf statement... –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 14 '11 at 23:49
    
Your size calculation being passed into GetCurrentDir is now wrong. sizeof(some_pointer) != sizeof(some_array), even if they point to the same amount of memory. I posted an update. –  Ed S. Sep 15 '11 at 0:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're returning a pointer to a local variable declared in get_current_path, i.e., a variable that will likely be cleaned up once the function returns. You should accept a buffer as an argument and fill it for the caller, i.e.,

void char* get_current_path(char* outDir)

PER YOUR EDIT:

int main(int argc, char **argv) 
{
    char *path = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*FILENAME_MAX);
    GetCurrentDir(path, sizeof(path));
    printf("path: %s\n", path);
    //other stuff
}

sizeof(path) is going to be 4 or 8 (32-bit or 64-bit) as it is now just a pointer, not an array. You need to pass in the actual size, i.e., sizeof(char) * FILENAME_MAX, so...

int main(int argc, char **argv) 
{
    size_t bufSize = sizeof(char) * FILENAME_MAX;
    char *path = (char*)malloc(bufSize);
    GetCurrentDir(path, bufSize);
    printf("path: %s\n", path);
    //other stuff
}
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current_dir is a stack variable, and is getting clobbered upon return. Either declare it static or accept a char buffer as a parameter.

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+1, I was too slow. –  Ed S. Sep 15 '11 at 0:06

current_dir is local to get_current_path() so when the function returns it is popped off the stack and the runtime is free to stick whatever it wants into those stack locations. That's why the printf prints gibberish.

To fix the problem do one of the following

  • declare the array as static
  • move array declaration to file scope (I'd also make it a static array) and then main() can refer to to the array directly, no need to pass a pointer back
  • use malloc to allocate the buffer within the get_current_path() function and return the allocated buffer pointer. If you do this, do not forget to free the allocated memory once you're done using it.
  • as @JonathanPatschke says in his answer, you can also change get_current_path() to accept a pointer to the array, then you don't need to make it static.
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