Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have an abstract class:

abstract class Foo extends Bar {

    public abstract int foo();

}

that I want to extend at runtime to create a Class object. The hope would be that I could have a dynamically generated class:

class FooImpl extends Foo {

    @Override
    public int foo() {
        return 5;
    }

}

that would be represented by a Class object and that I could then use reflection to create new instances of. The key is that I would like to decide the return value of the method foo() at runtime. My thought is to use ASM to create the bytecode for the class and then use reflection on a ClassLoader object to define the Class.

Is using ASM and then reflection of the method ClassLoader#defineClass on the generated bytes the best way to implement abstract methods at runtime with non-hardcoded values?

If yes, how would I go about doing that. My gut is to utilize the ASMifierClassVisitor, but I'm not quite sure on the exact method of doing that. I know that if all else fails I can manually go through the JVM instructions required to define a specific class but I feel there must be an easier way.

If no, what is the best way and how would I go about using the best way?

EDIT: I checked out all of the answers and I decided that none of them were exactly what I was looking for. I ended up creating a small implementation of what I was talking about with ASM. I figured I should post it here:

import org.objectweb.asm.*;

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.PrintWriter;
import java.lang.reflect.Field;
import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import java.util.HashMap;

/**
 * Created by IntelliJ IDEA.
 * User: Matt
 * Date: 9/17/11
 * Time: 12:42 PM
 */
public class OverrideClassAdapter extends ClassAdapter {

    private final HashMap<String, Object> code;
    private final String className;

    private final ClassWriter writer;

    private String superName;

    public OverrideClassAdapter(ClassWriter writer, String className, Queue<int[]> constructorCode, HashMap<String, Object> code) {
        super(writer);
        this.writer = writer;
        this.className = className;
        this.code = code;
    }

    @Override
    public void visit(int version, int access, String name, String signature, String superName, String[] interfaces) {
        this.superName = name;
        if((access & Opcodes.ACC_ABSTRACT) != 0)
            access &= ~Opcodes.ACC_ABSTRACT;
        if((access & Opcodes.ACC_INTERFACE) != 0)
            access &= ~Opcodes.ACC_INTERFACE;
        cv.visit(version, access, className, signature, name, null);
    }

    @Override
    public void visitSource(String source, String debug) {
    }

    @Override
    public MethodVisitor visitMethod(int access, String name, String desc, String signature, String[] exceptions) {
        boolean isAbstract = (access & Opcodes.ACC_ABSTRACT) != 0;
        if(isAbstract)
            access &= ~Opcodes.ACC_ABSTRACT;
        MethodWriter mw = (MethodWriter) cv.visitMethod(access, name, desc, signature, exceptions);
        Object value = code.get(name);
        if(isAbstract || value != null) {
            if(value instanceof BytecodeValue) {
                BytecodeValue returnableValue = (BytecodeValue) value;
                int[] byteCode = new int[returnableValue.getValueCode().length + 1];
                System.arraycopy(returnableValue.getValueCode(), 0, byteCode, 0, returnableValue.getValueCode().length);
                if(returnableValue.getValueCode().length > 1 && returnableValue.getValueCode()[1] == 0) {
                    byteCode[1] = writer.newConst(returnableValue.getValue());
                }
                byteCode[byteCode.length - 1] = returnableValue.getReturnCode();
                value = byteCode;
            }
            return new OverrideMethodAdapter(mw, (int[]) value);
        }
        return mw;
    }

    private class OverrideMethodAdapter extends MethodAdapter {

        private final int[] code;

        private final MethodWriter writer;

        public OverrideMethodAdapter(MethodWriter writer, int[] code) {
            super(writer);
            this.writer = writer;
            this.code = code;
        }

        @Override
        public void visitEnd() {
            try {
                Field code = MethodWriter.class.getDeclaredField("code");
                code.setAccessible(true);
                ByteVector bytes = new ByteVector();
                for(int b : this.code)
                    bytes.putByte(b);
                code.set(writer, bytes);
            } catch (Exception e) {
              e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    public static byte[] extendClassBytes(Class clazz, String className, HashMap<String, Object> methodImpls) throws IOException {
        ClassReader cr = new ClassReader(clazz.getName());
        ClassWriter cw = new ClassWriter(0);
        cr.accept(new OverrideClassAdapter(cw, className, methodImpls), ClassReader.SKIP_DEBUG);
        cr = new ClassReader(cw.toByteArray());
        cw = new ClassWriter(ClassWriter.COMPUTE_MAXS | ClassWriter.COMPUTE_FRAMES);
        cr.accept(cw, ClassReader.SKIP_DEBUG);
        //CheckClassAdapter.verify(new org.objectweb.asm.ClassReader(cw.toByteArray()), true, new PrintWriter(System.out));
        /*File file = new File(className + ".class");
        new FileOutputStream(file).write(cw.toByteArray());*/
        return cw.toByteArray();
    }


    public static Class extendClass(Class clazz, String className, HashMap<String, Object> methodImpls) throws IOException {
        return defineClass(extendClassBytes(clazz, className, methodImpls), className);
    }

    public static Class defineClass(byte[] code, String name) {
        try {
            Method method = ClassLoader.class.getDeclaredMethod("defineClass", String.class, byte[].class, int.class, int.class);
            method.setAccessible(true);
            return (Class) method.invoke(Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader(), name, code, 0, code.length);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return null;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I think you might have to look at synthetic methods. –  Shahzeb Sep 15 '11 at 2:37
    
Decide the return value of foo at runtime? How would a class call that if it returns an arbitrary type? –  Dave Newton Sep 15 '11 at 3:24
    
At runtime in the sense that the value of foo is determined when the class is generated, and it does not need to change afterwards. –  mburke13 Sep 15 '11 at 3:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You might want to look at using CGLib. It can do what Java's dynamic proxies can do but for abstract classes as well as interfaces, and it has a similar API to java.lang.reflect.Proxy for doing this as well. CGLib uses ASM behind the scenes anyway, but by using CGLib you wont have to craft bytecode directly.

Here's an example of how to use CGLib to do this:

package cglibtest;

import java.lang.reflect.Method;

import net.sf.cglib.proxy.Enhancer;
import net.sf.cglib.proxy.MethodInterceptor;
import net.sf.cglib.proxy.MethodProxy;

public class CGLibTest
{
    public static void main(String... args)
    {
        MyAbstract instance = (MyAbstract)Enhancer.create(MyAbstract.class, new MyInterceptor(42));
        System.out.println("Value from instance: " + instance.valueMethod());
    }

    public static class MyInterceptor implements MethodInterceptor
    {
        private final Object constantValue;

        public MyInterceptor(Object constantValue)
        {
            this.constantValue = constantValue;
        }

        @Override
        public Object intercept(Object obj, Method method, Object[] args,
                MethodProxy proxy) throws Throwable
        {
            if ("valueMethod".equals(method.getName()))
                return(constantValue);
            else
                return(null);
        }
    }

    public static abstract class MyAbstract
    {
        public abstract int valueMethod();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I checked out cglib and I'm a little lost on how I'd go about implementing abstract methods in a generated class. Do you have any documentation or reading that I can look at to see what is supposed to be done? –  mburke13 Sep 15 '11 at 23:40
    
@Matt added an example, for more info check out the website (such as examples or the javadocs. –  prunge Sep 16 '11 at 0:35
    
Thank you for the example and links. I have chosen your answer as the best for my question. Out of curiosity, is using the method interceptor the best/only way to implement abstract methods? Though it gets the job done I'm wondering what happens with classes that have say 4 or 5 abstract methods when the each method's name must be checked for in order to execute the method's code. It seems kind of clunky (i.e. if (abstractMethod1.equals(method.getName()) doThis(); else if (abstractMethod2.equals(method.getName()) doThis1(); etc –  mburke13 Sep 16 '11 at 21:25
    
How would you call a non-abstract method of a abstract class? –  Njax3SmmM2x2a0Zf7Hpd Aug 11 at 12:43

What's stopping you from reading the value 5 from say properties and return it back? That's too simple so, I guess you must have something more complex than returning an int that you want to accomplish here. I agree with the posts above that generating classes at runtime would be very expensive. If you know your business logic in advance, you can apply the Factory pattern to load the desired implementation of defined interfaces at runtime. That's how JDBC libraries work.

If you do not know the business logic in advance and have lot's of it then, you might benefit from using an off the shelf Rule Engine to process the logic and return results back to your Java program. It is much easier to maintain this logic in a Rule Engine specially if it is changing frequently.

share|improve this answer

Yes, that approach should work. But it will be expensive if you do a lot of class generation. (We are probably talking about hundreds of thousands of instructions to generate the bytecode file and then load it. And then there's the memory need to represent the class when it is loaded.)

Another approach (also expensive) is to generate source code and compile and load it at runtime.

Finally, you should consider the approach of making the logic of the objects table-driven or implementing it using some kind of interpreter. If you actually need to have different classes, you could wrap this up using Java's dynamic proxy class mechanism; e.g. see java.lang.reflect.Proxy

share|improve this answer
    
I was looking at the proxy option but I'm limited by the fact that the abstract methods have to be declared in an abstract class and not an interface (I need the abstract class to extend a class). The generation of the classes would be done on start and wouldn't be any more than 10-100 classes. –  mburke13 Sep 15 '11 at 3:43
    
@Matt - you could refactor your abstract class so that it is an interface and an abstract class that implements it, then wrap the instance of the abstract class inside the proxy. For that number of classes, the code generation approach shouldn't be too expensive, but it is a complicated and (potentially) fragile way to address this problem ... if the generated methods need to be complicated. (And if they don't, a table-driven approach would be simpler.) –  Stephen C Sep 15 '11 at 6:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.