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Okay I've had this happen to me before where variables randomly change numbers because of memory allocation issues or wrong addressing etc, such as when you go out of bounds with an array. However, I'm not using arrays, or pointers or addresses so I have no idea why after executing this loop it suddenly decides that "exponent" after being set to 0 is equal to 288 inside the loop:

EDIT: It decides to break on specifically: 0x80800000.

This does not break in one test, we have a "testing" client which iterates through several test cases, each time it calls this again, each time the function is called again the values should be set equal to their original values.

/* 
 * float_i2f - Return bit-level equivalent of expression (float) x
 *   Result is returned as unsigned int, but
 *   it is to be interpreted as the bit-level representation of a
 *   single-precision floating point values.
 *   Legal ops: Any integer/unsigned operations incl. ||, &&. also if, while
 *   Max ops: 30
 *   Rating: 4
 */
unsigned float_i2f(int x) { 
    int sign= 0;
    int a=0;
    int exponent=0;
    int crash_test=0;
    int exp=0;
    int fraction=0;
    int counter=0;

    if (x == 0) return 0;
    if (!(x ^ (0x01 << 31)))
    {
        return 0xCF << 24;
    }
    if (x>>31)
    {
        sign = 0xFF << 31;
        x = (~x) + 1;
    }
    else
    {
        sign = 0x00;
    }
    //printf(" After : %x  ", x);

    a = 1;
    exponent = 0;
    crash_test = 0;
    while ((a*2) <= x)
    {
        if (a == 0) a =1;
        if (a == 1) crash_test = exponent;
        /*
        if(exponent == 288) 
        {exponent =0;
            counter ++;
            if(counter <=2)
            printf("WENT OVERBOARD WTF %d  ORIGINAL %d", a, crash_test);
        }
        */
        if (exponent > 300) break;

        exponent ++;
        a *= 2;
    }

    exp = (exponent + 0x7F) << 23;
    fraction = (~(((0x01)<< 31) >> 7)) & (x << (25 - (exponent + 1)));
    return sign | exp | fraction;
}
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1  
I'd add cout << progress along the way to debug the code, as I can't read it. –  Blender Sep 15 '11 at 3:46
2  
Is this the minimal example that will produce the error? –  Beta Sep 15 '11 at 3:48
2  
After 288 iterations, that's exactly what it will equal ... –  Brian Roach Sep 15 '11 at 3:55
1  
What was the offending value of x that caused this? Did it only happen for one value of x? –  smci Sep 15 '11 at 3:56
3  
Well you know you're just going around in a loop and incrementing exponent so eventually it will hit 288. It will probably happen really fast cos loops are quick these days (no more mechanical calculators that used hamsters to spin gears used in the Babbage's day). –  sashang Sep 15 '11 at 4:04

7 Answers 7

a overflows. a*2==0 when a==1<<31, so every time exponent%32==0, a==0 and you loop until exponent==300.

There are a few other issues as well:

Your fraction calculation is off when exponent>=24. Negative left shifts do not automatically turn into positive right shifts.

The mask to generate the fraction is also slightly wrong. The leading bit is always assumed to be 1, and the mantissa is only 23 bits, so fraction for x<2^23 should be:

    fraction = (~(((0x01)<< 31) >> 8)) & (x << (24 - (exponent + 1)));

The loop to calculate the exponent fails when abs(x)>=1<<31 (and incidentally results in precision loss if you don't round appropriately); a loop that takes the implicit 1 into account would be better here.

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There were many useless attempts at optimization in there, I've removed them so the code is easier to read. Also I used <stdint.h> types as appropriate.

There was signed integer overflow in a *= 2 in the loop, but the main problem was lack of constants and weird computation of magic numbers.

This still isn't exemplary because the constants should all be named, but this seems to work reliably.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

uint32_t float_i2f(int32_t x) { 
    uint32_t sign= 0;
    uint32_t exponent=0;
    uint32_t fraction=0;

    if (x == 0) return 0;
    if ( x == 0x80000000 )
    {
        return 0xCF000000u;
    }
    if ( x < 0 )
    {
        sign = 0x80000000u;
        x = - x;
    }
    else
    {
        sign = 0;
    }

    /* Count order of magnitude, this will be excessive by 1. */
    for ( exponent = 1; ( 1u << exponent ) <= x; ++ exponent ) ;

    if ( exponent < 24 ) {
        fraction = 0x007FFFFF & ( x << 24 - exponent ); /* strip leading 1-bit */
    } else {
        fraction = 0x007FFFFF & ( x >> exponent - 24 );
    }
    exponent = (exponent + 0x7E) << 23;
    return sign | exponent | fraction;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The weird formatting is necessary for the class and what not. I can't directly make constants greater than 8 bits, nor can i use the "<" operator for conditions i believe. –  oorosco Sep 15 '11 at 4:18
    
Been working on it, it may be that it's overflowing the A value, seems i might have to put a check condition for that case. –  oorosco Sep 15 '11 at 4:27
    
Can't make constants greater than 8 bits???? I hope you forget whatever this class is teaching you — there are many terrible practices in this code, which render it hard to verify and no faster than the maintainable alternative. –  Potatoswatter Sep 15 '11 at 4:32
    
@oorosco: Yes, a was overflowing and needed to be unsigned. Here is a working solution. –  Potatoswatter Sep 15 '11 at 4:49
    
@oorosco: Never forget that your teacher is a pathetic programmer who needs to assert that his 8-bit ways are relevant rather than keep up with the times. The course should be using 8-bit assembly language if that is the subject matter — I took a course that used 8086 asm and there were interesting problems, but this is just asinine. –  Potatoswatter Sep 15 '11 at 4:52

Just handle the case where "a" goes negative (or better, validate your input so it never goes negative int he first place), and you should be fine :)

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The variable exponent isn't doing anything mysterious. You are incrementing exponent each time through the loop, so it eventually hits any number you like. The real question is why doesn't your loop exit when you think it should?

Your loop condition depends on a. Try printing out the successive values of a as your loop repeats. Do you notice anything funny happening after a reaches 1073741824? Have you heard about integer overflow in your classes yet?

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Use a debugger or IDE, set a watch/breakpoint/assert on the value of exponent (e.g. (exponent > 100).

What was the offending value of x that float_i2f() was called with? Did exponent blow up for all x, or some range?

(Did you just say when x = 0x80800000 ? Did you set a watch on exponent and step that in a debugger for that value? Should answer your question. Did you check that 0x807FFFFF works, for example?)

share|improve this answer
    
to add to this, almost nothing happens suddenly. if it's a repeatable error then you are doing the same thing wrong wach time. you need to log or watch what happens to see where the code breaks down. –  madmik3 Sep 15 '11 at 3:58
    
@madmik3 that's precisely what I just said to him :) Need more information. –  smci Sep 15 '11 at 4:01
    
Basically what i'm saying is that yes x = 0x80800000 when this happens, trying to test it in visual studio now, i was using gdb earlier using unix, teacher provided us with a test case program. –  oorosco Sep 15 '11 at 4:06

You have line that increments exponent at the end of your while loop.

while((a*2) <= x)
{
    if(a == 0) a =1;
    if(a == 1) crash_test = exponent;
    /* 

    if(exponent == 288) 
    {
        exponent =0;
        counter ++;
        if(counter <=2)
        printf("WENT OVERBOARD WTF %d  ORIGINAL %d", a, crash_test);
    }
    */

    if(exponent > 300) break;

    exponent ++;
    a *= 2;

}
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I tried it myself with Visual Studio, and an input of "10", and it seemed to work OK.

Q: Can you give me an input value of "x" where it fails?

Q: What compiler are you using? What platform are you running on?

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1  
what about exponent ++;? –  madmik3 Sep 15 '11 at 3:59
    
We're using gcc i believe, we "make" it in unix and then execute a test client on it. The test client tells me if i got it wrong. It claims that on the test 0x80800000 it messes up, i've narrowed it down to being incapable of progressign because a gets set to 0, and exponent gets set to 288 for some god foresaken reason –  oorosco Sep 15 '11 at 4:00
    
consider looking at gdb to step through the code. unknownroad.com/rtfm/gdbtut/gdbuse.html –  madmik3 Sep 15 '11 at 4:03
    
You just answered your own question :) "0x80800000" has the sign bit set. What happens when "a" goes negative? And you keep multiplying by two? Whoops ;) –  paulsm4 Sep 15 '11 at 4:31

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