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This question already has an answer here:

Short Story

Let's say my HTML is already set in stone:

<div id="blockA">Block A</div>
<div id="blockB">Block B</div>
<div id="blockC">Block C</div>

It will look like this:

------------
| Block A  |
------------
| Block B  |
------------
| Block C  |
------------

Now I want to switch the order of the blocks. How can I do that with only CSS?

------------
| Block C  |
------------
| Block A  |
------------
| Block B  |
------------

I'm aware there's hacky solutions such as using position:absolute, but this doesn't preserve the effective use of the display:block property. That is, blocks push other blocks downward when they grow in size.

Long Story

When user uses a computer to view my webpage, the blocks are displayed in this order:

  1. General info.
  2. Event schedule.
  3. iPhone app advertisement

The iPhone app advertisement is placed last because it's not terribly important to computer users. A small percentage of computer users will whip out their phone and install the app.

If a mobile user comes to this site, the iPhone app advertisement should be the most important thing on the page. Therefore, it should be moved to the top:

  1. iPhone app advertisement
  2. General info.
  3. Event schedule.

I would like iPhone and computer users to share the same HTML, but have a CSS media query switch the order of the blocks.

@media only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) {
   #blockC {
      /* magic order switching */
   }
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by cimmanon css Mar 21 at 15:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Why would you need to do this with only CSS, if you mind me asking? – Blender Sep 15 '11 at 3:53
1  
position: absolute doesn't change display: block. – alex Sep 15 '11 at 3:53
2  
position:absolute doesn't preserve the stacking and pushing nature of display:block, which is the whole point of having a block element. – JoJo Sep 15 '11 at 4:30
3  
I just like to have distinct roles for HTML, CSS, and JS. I like HTML to only deal with information, CSS to only deal with appearance, and JS to only deal with user interaction. I'm OCD about model-view-controller. If I have to change my HTML to change the appearance, then a little piece of my heart dies. – JoJo Sep 15 '11 at 4:48
1  
I don't think it's unreasonable to want to do this through CSS - I would rather put it behind a media query and let that be the single source of truth for how the site's layout will respond than splitting that logic across css and js. – Nick Heiner Dec 7 '14 at 23:20

13 Answers 13

up vote 56 down vote accepted

As has already been suggested, Flexbox is the answer - particularly because you only need to support a single modern browser: Mobile Safari.

See: http://jsfiddle.net/thirtydot/hLUHL/

You can remove the -moz- prefixed properties if you like, I just left them in for future readers.

CSS:

#blockContainer {
    display: -webkit-box;
    display: -moz-box;
    display: box;

    -webkit-box-orient: vertical;
    -moz-box-orient: vertical;
    box-orient: vertical;
}
#blockA {
    -webkit-box-ordinal-group: 2;
    -moz-box-ordinal-group: 2;
    box-ordinal-group: 2;
}
#blockB {
    -webkit-box-ordinal-group: 3;
    -moz-box-ordinal-group: 3;
    box-ordinal-group: 3;
}

HTML:

<div id="blockContainer">
    <div id="blockA">Block A</div>
    <div id="blockB">Block B</div>
    <div id="blockC">Block C</div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
7  
Let's just hope Windows 7 phone with its freaking IE never becomes mainstream so we can continue using cool CSS like this. – JoJo Sep 17 '11 at 6:27
    
Brilliant but could be very slow on complex pages – Christopher Tokar Feb 11 '13 at 15:44
    
@thirtydot wonderful..! I never know this.. thanks a lot – Code Lover May 4 '13 at 17:42
3  
The flexbox specification changed, see here for examples of the new implementation: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Guide/CSS/Flexible_boxes – Daniel Ristic Sep 11 '13 at 16:13
    
For this solution, you would have to hope that the underlying implementation uses IDs or some other mechanism to unique identify each div inside the blockContainer. – Doug Jan 16 '14 at 1:20

Here is a "simple as possible" example, for changing the order of div-elements (when resizing the browser window):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <title>foobar</title>
    <style>
      @media screen and (max-width:300px){
        #parent{
          display:flex;
          flex-flow: column;
        }
        #a{order:2;}
        #c{order:1;}
        #b{order:3;}
      }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div id="parent">
      <div id="a">one</div>
      <div id="b">two</div>
      <div id="c">three</div>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/devnull/qyroxexv/ (change window-width to see the effect of changing the order of the divs)

share|improve this answer
3  
This is actually pretty gorgeous...! – Kablam Nov 3 '14 at 16:32
3  
If you declare #c { order: -1; }, then you don't need to override the order of #a and #b. – 200_success Mar 31 at 6:57
1  
Simple and beautiful – Jupo Mar 31 at 10:31
1  
This should be the accepted answer - it works nicer and cleaner – Jeff Kranenburg May 10 at 8:29

I known this is old, but I found a easier solution and it works on ie10, firefox and chrome:

<div id="wrapper">
  <div id="one">One</div>
  <div id="two">Two</div>
  <div id="three">Three</div>
</div> 

This is the css:

#wrapper {display:table;}
#one {display:table-footer-group;}
#three {display:table-header-group;}

And the result:

"Three"
"Two"
"One"

I found it here.

share|improve this answer
1  
Very helpful for when using a table! – deebs Feb 17 '15 at 20:44

Update: Two lightweight CSS solutions:

Using flex, flex-flow and order:

Example1: Demo Fiddle

    body{
        display:flex;
        flex-flow: column;
    }
    #blockA{
        order:4;
    }
    #blockB{
        order:3;
    }
    #blockC{
        order:2;
    }

Alternatively, reverse the Y scale:

Example2: Demo Fiddle

body{
    -webkit-transform: scaleY(-1);
    transform: scaleY(-1);
}
div{
    -webkit-transform: scaleY(-1);
    transform: scaleY(-1);
}
share|improve this answer

HTML:

<div id="blockC second-order">Block C</div>
<div id="blockA">Block A</div>
<div id="blockB">Block B</div>
<div id="blockC first-order">Block C</div>

CSS

.second-order {
     display: none;
}

@media only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) {
     .first-order: {
         display: none;
     }

     .second-order: {
         display: block;
     }
}

I think this is non-stupid solution becouse repeating content is no problem in the most of cases and in your case if it is advertisment you would repeat not a lot of content.

I've answers on this question althought one year passed, becouse I was searching for solution, I read this and got this idea.

share|improve this answer
1  
Interesting "thinking outside the box" approach. However, I would only recommend it if the duplicated content is inserted automatically or duplicated via some include mechanism. If it means cut/paste a block of content, that would be a maintenance nightmare. (Someone will come along later, and only make a fix in one place, test it on one screen width, and not realize they didn't fix it in all cases.) – ToolmakerSteve Aug 8 '14 at 1:31
    
I agreed, but I think if we use some include mechanism there shouldn't be a problem with coping/pasting, but without it my solution is not the best - I know. – kspacja Aug 8 '14 at 11:08
<div id="container">
    <div id="a">Block A</div>
    <div id="b">Block B</div>
    <div id="c">Block C</div>
</div>

lets say the height of a block is 100px

#container     {position:relative; height: 300px;}
#a, #b, #c     {position:absolute; height: 100px}
#c             {top: 0px;}
#b             {top: 100px;}
#a             {top: 200px;}
share|improve this answer
4  
I don't want to hardcode the heights. The elements inside are dynamic, so the height is not known. – JoJo Sep 15 '11 at 4:27

You could try something new as the CSS3 Flexbox. Combining this with media queries should help you achieve your goal.

share|improve this answer

You could mess with the margins: http://jsfiddle.net/zV2p4/

But you would probably be better off using position: absolute. This does not change display: block, but it will make the width auto. To fix this, make the divs width: 100%

share|improve this answer
    
What if I wanted to preserve the block property? That is, if the top block all of a sudden has more text added, the bottom blocks would be pushed downward. With your hardcoding of margins, the blocks would collide. – JoJo Sep 15 '11 at 4:43
    
You should probably use JavaScript then. There may be a CSS3 property that will accomplish this. But, CSS3 is not supported by all browsers. – Will Sep 15 '11 at 4:50

I managed to do it with CSS display: table-*. I haven't tested with more than 3 blocks though.

fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Good to see a solution that doesn't require CSS3 flex. Not generalizable to more than 3 top-level boxes -- but often that is enough. – ToolmakerSteve Aug 8 '14 at 1:20

This method worked for me without flexbox:

#blockA,
#blockB,
#blockC {
    border: 1px solid black;
    padding: 20px;
}


.reverseOrder,
#blockA,
#blockB,
#blockC {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(180deg);
       -moz-transform: rotate(180deg);
        -ms-transform: rotate(180deg);
         -o-transform: rotate(180deg);
            transform: rotate(180deg);
}
<div class="reverseOrder">
    <div id="blockA">Block A</div>
    <div id="blockB">Block B</div>
    <div id="blockC">Block C</div>
</div>

share|improve this answer

Possible in CSS3: http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-writing-modes/#writing-mode

Why not change the orders of the tags? Your HTML page isn't made out of stone, are they?

share|improve this answer
    
Layout flow is deprecated... Use writing mode instead – Will Sep 15 '11 at 4:06
    
@Will - Thanks, I was looking at the wrong resource. – dpp Sep 15 '11 at 4:10

Hows this for low tech...

put the ad at the top and bottom and use media queries to display:none as appropriate.

If the ad wasn't too big, it wouldn't add too much size to the download, you could even customise where the ad sent you for iPhone/pc.

share|improve this answer
    
BTW, this is what @kspacja's answer does, and it has code details. – ToolmakerSteve Aug 8 '14 at 1:27

Since I had multiple element that followed the two elements I wanted to switch the already posted answers did not work for me. Using "absolute" would also break my layout. The following did work though:

HTML

<div class="wrapper">
 <div id="first_div">first div</div>
 <div id="second_div">second div</div>
</div>

CSS

.flipit {
  position: relative;
}

.flipit #first_div {
  position: relative;
  top: 100px;
}

.flipit #second_div {
  position: relative;
  bottom: 100px;
}
share|improve this answer

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