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I have the following query:

$imgDimensions_query = "SELECT MAX(imgWidth) maxWidth, MAX(imgHeight) maxHeight FROM (
    SELECT imgHeight, imgWidth FROM primary_images WHERE imgId=$imgId
    UNION 
    SELECT imgHeight, imgWidth FROM secondary_images WHERE primaryId=$imgId) as MaxHeight";

It's working fantastic, but I would like to know how I can find the value of the column imgId, as well as the table name, for both the maxWidth and maxHeight values?

The reason I want this is I need to know if the maxWidth and maxHeight values belong to the same item in the database.

I'm wondering if this is possible by amending the current SQL query?


What would be perfect is if, along with querying the maxWidth and maxHeight values, a boolean could be set up to output true if both the maxWidth and maxHeight belong to the same entry (at least once).

I'm thinking, since the image data in primary_images is unique from the data in secondary_images (and vice versa), a boolean could be set up in each of the queries, and as long as one true exists, true is output. Does that make sense? Is that possible?


I have managed to put together a second query which uses the values of maxWidth and maxHeight from the first query to output the number of images in a specific set that hold both values. All I really care about is if there is or if there isn't one or more images that meet the above requirement, so again, a boolean would be better than the total number. If you have an idea of how to amend the following to show a boolean instead of the number of results, let me know!

I have been reassured that with a maximum number of entries in both tables being under 1000, using two queries instead of one shouldn't cause a hit to speed. If you think so as well, and if combining these queries into one is ridiculous, then let me know that as well.

The second query:

$haveDimensions_query = "SELECT sum(rows) AS total_rows FROM (
    SELECT count(*) AS rows FROM primary_images WHERE imgId = $imgId and imgWidth = $maxImageWidth and imgHeight = $maxImageHeight
    UNION ALL
    SELECT count(*) AS rows FROM secondary_images WHERE primaryId = $imgId and imgWidth = $maxImageWidth and imgHeight = $maxImageHeight
) as union_table";
share|improve this question
    
What if there are several images that share the maximum width and several that share the maximum height, and some of them have both (possibly more than one image), how would you like to report that? Please add a data sample and the desired output, preferably covering the case I mentioned, too. –  Andriy M Sep 15 '11 at 6:18
    
@Andriy M - Excellent question and point. I'm looking to see if the maximum width and the maximum height belong to the same image. In other words, as you said "...and some of them have both (possibly more than one image)...". Even if a boolean was set up to show this, that would be good. I don't care if more than one image has the max height, or the max width. I only care if at least one has both the max height, and the max width. Does that make it clearer? –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 6:39
    
@Andriy M - What would you like concerning a data sample. I'm new to all of this and I'm not sure of the lingo. Does my previous comment clarify my desired output? –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 6:41
    
I think yes, it does, thanks. That is, I understand it like this: your ultimate goal is to return an image (or images) with both the maximum width and the maximum height, and you actually don't care about images that have only one maximum attribute but not the other. Is it correct? –  Andriy M Sep 15 '11 at 6:57
    
Upon reading your update, I stand corrected: it seems like you don't want the images, you only want to know about the fact that at least one image has both maximums. –  Andriy M Sep 15 '11 at 7:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could do this in two queries, it's probably easier to read that way. First query is what you have to get to get the max height and width.

You then can issue the second query which looks like:

SElECT primaryId FROM (
   SELECT imgHeight, imgWidth, imgId AS primaryId FROM primary_images
    UNION 
    SELECT imgHeight, imgWidth, primaryId FROM secondary_images
) as union_table
WHERE imgWidth = [maxWidth] and imgHeight = [maxHeight];

Where [maxWidth] and [maxHeight] are the two values that you get from previous query. If they belong to the same image ID, you will have query result greater than zero, if not this query will have no result.

If you need to know which id is belong to which table, you could create artificial column (e.g. source) and your query would become:

SElECT primaryId, source FROM (
   SELECT imgHeight, imgWidth, imgId AS primaryId, 1 as source FROM primary_images
    UNION 
    SELECT imgHeight, imgWidth, primaryId, 2 as source FROM secondary_images
) as union_table
WHERE imgWidth = [maxWidth] and imgHeight = [maxHeight];

Note that there is now artificial column called source. So if your result from query is

primaryId     source
4             1 
4             2
5             2

You know that imgId 4 from primary_images as well as primaryId 4,5 from secondary_images match with the max height and max width of the previous query

And finally, if you just want to know whether there is image that is matching or not, per our comments and discussion below, you could do:

SElECT count(*) AS imgCount FROM (
   SELECT imgHeight, imgWidth, imgId AS primaryId FROM primary_images
    UNION ALL
    SELECT imgHeight, imgWidth, primaryId FROM secondary_images
) as union_table
WHERE primaryId = $imgId and imgWidth = [maxWidth] and imgHeight = [maxHeight];

Where imgCount will be zero if there is no matching image or greater than zero otherwise

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks mono. I'm testing it out. Curious however, do I need to use PHP to extract the values from the first query, place them in variables, and then use the variables in place of [maxWidth] and [maxHeight]? –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 17:29
    
@stefmikhail That's correct. You need to do exactly what you just wrote. Making this as one query is possible but it will make it harder to read. Given your number of records is not large, it might better and easier to read if you do two queries. –  momo Sep 15 '11 at 17:36
    
So I placed the variables inside, and I think that's the right thing to do. However, I'm getting the error: Unknown column. I believe this is because we are fetching primaryId. The primary_images table does not contain a primaryId column; It contains a imgId column. I have a feeling it's more complex than just swapping primaryId for imgId in the primary_images part of the query, because you're selecting primaryId right at the beginning of the query. –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 17:36
    
@stefmikhail You could alias imgId as primaryId and the query would work. Put SELECT imgHeight, imgWidth, imgId as primaryId FROM primary_images on the first clause of the UNION –  momo Sep 15 '11 at 18:00
    
Something about this was bothering me, and I think I have just pinpointed what it is. Because both the primary_images table, and the secondary_images table use columns entitled imgId to uniquely identify their entries, there is the chance that there might be an entry in question in both tables, that have the same value for imgId, which, unless I'm mistaken, makes the query you have provided, problematic. –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 19:04

[Original answer is below - this should be better]

I think I misunderstood your question. The following query should give a result set that includes one row for each image that has greatest height or greatest width compared to all images, and it will have the ID and table name in the row along with the height and width.

Since the maximum height and width may not be from the same image, there can't necessarily be just one row in the result with a single image ID and table source.

I hope this is at least closer to what you were looking for.

SELECT
  imgId,
  tName,
  imgWidth,
  imgHeight
FROM (
        SELECT imgId, 'Primary' tName, imgHeight, imgWidth
        FROM primary_images WHERE imgId=$imgId
        UNION 
        SELECT imgId, 'Secondary' tName, imgHeight, imgWidth
        FROM secondary_images WHERE primaryId=$imgId
      ) as T
WHERE 
 (T.imgHeight >= (SELECT MAX(imgHeight) FROM primary_images)
  AND
  T.imgHeight >= (SELECT MAX(imgHeight) FROM secondary_images)
 )
 OR
 (T.imgWidth >= (SELECT MAX(imgWidth) FROM primary_images)
  AND
  T.imgWidth >= (SELECT MAX(imgWidth) FROM secondary_images)
 )

-- ORIGINAL ANSWER BELOW --

Try something like this:

   SELECT
      imgId,
      tName,
      MAX(imgWidth) maxWidth,
      MAX(imgHeight) maxHeight FROM (
        SELECT imgId, 'Primary' tName, imgHeight, imgWidth
        FROM primary_images WHERE imgId=$imgId
        UNION 
        SELECT imgId, 'Secondary' tName, imgHeight, imgWidth
        FROM secondary_images WHERE primaryId=$imgId
      ) as T
   GROUP BY imgId, tName;

(MaxHeight wasn't a good alias name for the derived table, because it isn't a table of maximum heights. I changed it to T.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a bunch. I will test it out and let you know! –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 4:49
    
+1 You beat me to it –  Icarus Sep 15 '11 at 4:51
    
@Steve Kass - Sorry to ask this; I'm still learning. I have been placing the queried values in variables using the following: $maxImageWidth = $dimension_array[maxWidth]; and $maxImageHeight = $dimension_array[maxHeight];. How should I place imgId and tName in variables? The same way? –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 5:15
    
@Steve Kass - I'm pretty sure you accidentally left the ) as MaxHeight in the code. I will edit. –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 5:40
    
@Steve Kass - So, I got the query working. But I'm not sure what the imgId and tName are referring to? I printed the array and there is one value for each selected column. The problem is, I am trying to find the imgId and table name for each the maxWidth and maxHeight values. The goal is to compare them and see if they come from the same image, or different images. Is this query able to do this? –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 6:02

Here's what I've got so far. It looks (and probably is) heavily suboptimal. Nevertheless, I'm posting it primarily to present the general idea. Hopefully, someone might develop it so as to make the result more efficient:

SELECT
  m.maxWidth,
  m.maxHeight,
  (u.imgWidth IS NOT NULL) AS OneImageHasBoth
FROM (
  SELECT
    MAX(imgWidth)  AS maxWidth,
    MAX(imgHeight) AS maxHeight
  FROM (
    SELECT imgWidth, imgHeight
    FROM primary_images
    UNION
    SELECT imgWidth, imgHeight
    FROM secondary_images
  ) u
) m
  LEFT JOIN  (
    SELECT imgWidth, imgHeight
    FROM primary_images
    UNION
    SELECT imgWidth, imgHeight
    FROM secondary_images
  ) u ON m.maxWidth = u.imgWidth AND m.maxHeight = u.imgHeight

Obviously, one way to optimise this could be to store the result of the repeating union into a temporary table. I'm not sure if your particular environment allows you to issue multi-statement queries, but if it does, that would definitely help to speed up the query.

Your idea of finding the results for each table separately and then combining them is actually not bad. But I think the logic behind combining the results should be a bit more complex. One obvious example would be, the result for one table contains true and the other false but the latter has bigger width and height, so returning true would be incorrect. Or consider this example:

Suppose, the result for primary_images is

maxWidth  maxHeight  OneImageHasBoth
--------  ---------  ---------------
1152      864        true

and for secondary_images it's

maxWidth  maxHeight  OneImageHasBoth
--------  ---------  ---------------
1280      800        true

Both tables have images with both attributes maximal, but it is clear that if the query was applied to the unioned set, OneImageHasBoth would be false.

So, as you can see, combining the two results should be more intricate than merely relying on the presence of true in one of them.

Here's my attempt at implementing the method:

SELECT
  CASE WHEN p.maxWidth  > s.maxWidth  THEN p.maxWidth  ELSE s.maxWidth  END AS maxWidth,
  CASE WHEN p.maxHeight > s.maxHeight THEN p.maxHeight ELSE s.maxHeight END AS maxHeight,
  (
    p.maxWidth >= s.maxWidth AND p.maxHeight >= s.maxHeight AND p.OneImageHasBoth OR
    p.maxWidth <= s.maxWidth AND p.maxHeight <= s.maxHeight AND s.OneImageHasBoth
  ) AS OneImageHasBoth
FROM (
  SELECT DISTINCT
    m.maxWidth,  m.maxHeight,
    (i.imgWidth IS NOT NULL) AS OneImageHasBoth
  FROM (
    SELECT
      MAX(imgWidth)  AS maxWidth,
      MAX(imgHeight) AS maxHeight
    FROM primary_images
  ) m
    LEFT JOIN primary_images i ON m.maxWidth = i.imgWidth AND m.maxHeight = i.imgHeight
) p
CROSS JOIN (
  SELECT DISTINCT
    m.maxWidth,  m.maxHeight,
    (i.imgWidth IS NOT NULL) AS OneImageHasBoth
  FROM (
    SELECT
      MAX(imgWidth)  AS maxWidth,
      MAX(imgHeight) AS maxHeight
    FROM secondary_images
  ) m
    LEFT JOIN secondary_images i ON m.maxWidth = i.imgWidth AND m.maxHeight = i.imgHeight
) s
share|improve this answer
    
So I tested out the code. Your first idea alas did not provide the proper data. I tested it on a set of images that are all the same width and height, and the query returned the same max dimensions for width & height (I know they are not, although the value was correct for maxheight), as well it returned a 0 for OneImageHasBoth which I'm assuming means false, which should have returned true. Any thoughts? –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 15:21
    
Your second query is using things I haven't come across yet, not saying that I don't want to learn, but that I can't begin to understand how you're doing what you're doing. Also, it returned the following error when I tried to print the answers as an array: MySql ErrorUnknown column 'u.imgWidth' in 'field list'. Any idea what that means? –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 15:23
    
Just an idea: My original plan was to find all the imgId and table name for both the maxWidth value and maxHeight value (if there would be more than one for each, then return multiple pairings of imgId & table name), and then using PHP, compare the two arrays to see if any of the pairings matched, thus returning true. I'm wondering if perhaps this would not be easier than what you're doing above. Not that I'm not thanking you for it, I just don't really understand it, and unless you don't mind explaining it to me, It's going to be hard for me to get it to work. And ideas? –  stefmikhail Sep 15 '11 at 15:29
    
@stefmikhail: I'll look into both queries to investigate. Thanks for the feedback. –  Andriy M Sep 15 '11 at 17:33
    
@stefmikhail: Could it be that you took the first query's code before I applied a fix to it (u.imgWidth IS NULL to u.imgWidth IS NOT NULL)? That was some time before I posted the other query. Speaking of which, I fixed the wrong aliases, but other than that I agree that it looks clumsy. The idea of finding images with either of the maximums and then matching the two lists had occurred to me earlier, before posting this answer, in fact. It could be nicely implemented if MySQL supported FULL JOIN. There are workarounds for FULL JOIN, but the result might turn out as crazy as my second query. –  Andriy M Sep 15 '11 at 20:48

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