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Consider the following snippet:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %a = ( a => 1,
          b => 2,
          c => 'cucu',
          d => undef,
          r => 1,
          br => 2,
          cr => 'cucu',
          dr => '321312321',

        );

my $c = %a;

print $c;

The result of this is 5/8 and I don't understand what this represents. I read somewhere that a number from this fraction looking result might represent the number of buckets from the hash, but clearly this is not the case.

Does anyone knows how a perl hash is evaluated in scalar context?

Edit

I added a few other hashes to print:

use strict;
use warnings;

use 5.010;


my %a = ( a => 1,
          b => 2,
          c => 'cucu',
          d => undef,
          r => 1,
          br => 2,
          cr => 'cucu',
          dr => '321312321',

        );

my $c = %a;

say $c; # 5/8


%a = ( a => 1,
       b => 21,
       c => 'cucu',
       br => 2,
       cr => 'cucu',
       dr => '321312321',

      );

 $c = %a;

say $c; # 4/8

%a = ( a => 1,
       b => 2,
       c => 'cucu',
       d => undef,
       r => 1,
       br => 2,
       cr => 'cucu',
       dr => '321312321',
       drr => '32131232122',
      );

 $c = %a;

say $c; #6/8

So, you call a 'tuple' like a => 1 a bucket in the hash? in that case, why is the last hash still having 8 as a denominator when it has 9 'tuples' ?

Thank you all for your responses until now :)

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possible duplicate of What is 4/16 in hashes? –  ikegami Sep 15 '11 at 8:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A hash is an array of linked lists. A hashing function converts the key into a number which is used as the index of the array element ("bucket") into which to store the value. The linked list handles the case where more than one key hashes to the same index ("collision").

The denominator of the fraction is the total number of buckets.

The numerator of the fraction is the number of buckets which has one or more elements.

For hashes with the same number of elements, the higher the number, the better. The one that returns 6/8 has fewer collisions than the one that returns 4/8.

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From perldoc perldata:

If you evaluate a hash in scalar context, it returns false if the hash is empty. If there are any key/value pairs, it returns true; more precisely, the value returned is a string consisting of the number of used buckets and the number of allocated buckets, separated by a slash.

In your case, you have five values (1,2,''cucu',undef, and '321312321') that have been mapped to by eight keys (a,b,c,d,r,br,cr, and dr).

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Then again, it's unclear that this pattern holds in general: when I run my %h=("a"=>1,"b"=>2,"c"=>3);my $a=%h;print "$a\n";, I get an output of 3/8. =/ –  Jack Maney Sep 15 '11 at 8:12
1  
The fact that he happens to have 5 distinct values is just a coincidence. You can give each key a different value, and Perl will still report 5/8. The bucket usage depends only on the keys in the hash. –  cjm Sep 15 '11 at 8:15
1  
@Jack: The interpretation is wrong. The more buckets are used the better. A bucket in a typical hash table contains a key (which is a hash of the user supplied key) and a list of values which contain all values that are mapped by the same key (the different keys are said to collide). The longer the list grows the longer access times get. –  musiKk Sep 15 '11 at 8:22
    
@Jack: It's 3/8 because the three keys use three buckets and eight total buckets is the smallest number that perl will allocate for a hash. –  Dave Sherohman Sep 15 '11 at 8:44
1  
@JackManey: You can edit your answer to correct the mistake. If you do I will upvote your answer because unlike the accepted answer you actually cite the documentation. –  Richard Hansen Apr 2 at 21:05

The number of used buckets starts out to be approximately the number of keys; allocated buckets is consistently the lowest power of 2 > the number of keys. 5 keys will return 5/8. Larger numbers of unique keys grow slower, such that a hash %h that is just the list (1..128), with 64 key/value pairs, somehow gets a scalar value of 50/128.

However, once the hash has allocated its buckets, they will remain allocated even if you shrink the hash. I just made a hash %h with 9 pairs, thus 9/16 scalar; then when I reassigned %h to have just one pair, its scalar value was 1/16.

This actually makes sense in that it lets you test the hash's size, like a scalar of a simple array does.

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2  
It depends on the keys you provide. Some keys may collide which leads to only 50 buckets being used instead of 64 in your particular example. You could generate keys that fill 64 buckets or only one (which would be bad for performance). –  musiKk Sep 15 '11 at 8:24

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