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I have a general question to do with application directory structure. I have my application and all the files required on a git repo that is regularly updated (PHP files, CSS, JS etc). And I have an uploads folder where users' uploaded avatars and files get stored.

Is it convention to separate these two parts of the app for example?:

public_html
    /app
    /uploads

or should the directory structure look more like this?:

public_html
    /index.php
    /css
    /js
    /uploads

When I merge changes from github I don't want any of my users' files to be affected.

  1. So should the app be physically separated from the uploads or should I just include /uploads to .gitignore?
  2. What if any .htaccess rewrites are required?
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think both structures are fine -- it's up to you. As long as the uploads are in a seperate folder, you can exclude that from versioning and you should be fine. Your .htaccess can be in the versioning system as well.

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We originally thought the first one was the best idea and have had a nightmare attempting to make /app the root of the site for external files and PHP includes. We are looking to the future to attempt to make uploaded files only accessible from within our app and not via any old URL. Any ideas on this? –  wilsonpage Sep 15 '11 at 8:23
1  
@pagewil If you do not want /uploads to be accessible via URL in a browser, then just move it 1 level up -- outside public_html. That's if you can do that (depends on how your web server / folder structure is set up). If you cannot move it up -- utilize URL rewriting functionality to hide real file location (that's a general idea/advice as it's unclear for me what exactly you have in mind by "files only accessible from within our app"). –  LazyOne Sep 15 '11 at 8:42
    
@lazyOne do I have to proxy files through PHP to get access to them if they are outside public_html? Concerned this could impact image load times etc? –  wilsonpage Sep 15 '11 at 8:45
1  
@pagewil If file is located outside of website root (no way to access it via URL directly -- e.g. not even alias (Apache) or virtual directory (IIS) then you have to proxy it via some simple special php script (which will definitely make things slower). But then again -- if you can proxy it, you can access via URL -- right? Question is -- how do you plan to use those files in /uploads folder? If they have to be displayed on webpage with no additional modifications (like, picture resizing etc), then no real need to hide it like that. –  LazyOne Sep 15 '11 at 8:50
1  
@pagewil Yes, X-Sendfile is really good option that will allow you to serve such files by Apache (file can be located anywhere on server as long as you whitelisted that location). It's still be slower than directly accessible resource (as PHP has to kick in and do a bit of work) .. but definitely faster than doing all the job by PHP itself. If you send proper cache/expiry headers as well (for avatars and other static resources) so they will be cached by browser, it will reduce number of subsequent requests. –  LazyOne Sep 15 '11 at 9:10

I'd rather use the second option, if the uploads are not shared by different apps they should be part of the app so I would place it inside app's directory, and include it in .gitignore.

Both approaches are fine I guess. But for me the app structure should be like this, not everything should go in the public directory, only the things that need to be accessed by the user (server exclusive files should be protected from users)

/app
  /public_html
    index.html
    /css
    /js
  /class
  /conf
  /upload
  ..

class, conf, upload, ... should only be accessed by the server

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i would take a look to synfony or yii directory structure –  Packet Tracer Sep 15 '11 at 9:27
    
usually upload folder should be placed into public_html folder, coz uploaded files are meant to be used by users at any time –  Packet Tracer Sep 15 '11 at 12:50

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