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I have a numpy array and I want to retrieve all the elements except a certain index. For example, consider the following array

a = [0,1,2,3,4,5,5,6,7,8,9]

if I specify index 3, then the resultant should be

a = [0,1,2,4,5,5,6,7,8,9]
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6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Like resizing, removing elements from an numpy array is a slow operation (especially for large arrays since it requires allocating space and copying all the data from the original array to the new array). It should be avoided if possible.

Often you can do avoid it by working with a masked array instead. For example, consider the array a:

import numpy as np

a = np.array([0,1,2,3,4,5,5,6,7,8,9])
print(a)
print(a.sum())
# [0 1 2 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 9]
# 50

We can mask its value at index 3, and perform a summation which ignores masked elements:

a = np.ma.array(a, mask=False)
a.mask[3] = True
print(a)
print(a.sum())
# [0 1 2 -- 4 5 5 6 7 8 9]
# 47

Masked arrays also support many operations besides sum.

If you really need to, it is also possible to remove masked elements using the compressed method:

print(a.compressed())
# [0 1 2 4 5 5 6 7 8 9]

but as mentioned above, avoid it if possible.

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masked_inside() function refers to a given range of values. Question seems to be about masking a given index, not a value. –  Nucular Apr 21 '13 at 20:25
    
@user1123466: Thanks, you're right. Fixed. –  unutbu Apr 21 '13 at 21:21
    
For reference: in the newer versions of Numpy it's better to use a=np.ma.array(a) and a[3]=np.ma.masked (see docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/…) –  Daniele May 29 at 16:41
a_new = np.delete(a,3,0)

3 here is the index you wish to remove, 0 is the axis (zero in this case if using 1D array). See numpy.delete

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This should do it:

In [9]: np.hstack((a[:3], a[4:]))
Out[9]: array([0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])

If performance is an issue, the following will do it in place:

In [22]: a[3:-1] = a[4:]; a = a[:-1]
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cool way to do it –  Shan Sep 16 '11 at 9:12

You can also use numpy's fancy indexing. Example:

[~]
|46>a
[46] array([10, 33, 65, 36, 37, 29, 12, 81, 80, 87])

[~]
|47>idx
[47] [0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

[~]
|48>a[idx]
[48] array([10, 33, 65, 37, 29, 12, 81, 80, 87])
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The most simple way for do that is:

a[:n] + a[n+1:]

>>> a = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
>>> a[:2]
[0, 1]
>>> a[3:]
[3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
>>> a[:2] + a[3:]
[0, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

You can also do that:

>>> n = 3
>>> a[:n] + a[n+1:]
[0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
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2  
This does not work with NumPy arrays because they do not use + as a concatenation operator. If a is a NumPy array here, your code gives a value error for shape mismatch. –  Mr. F Mar 28 '12 at 23:52
    
@EMS you're right but i just follow question's example. –  DonCallisto Mar 29 '12 at 6:57
1  
But the question specifically says it is a NumPy array and then uses a regular list just because it's a more convenient illustration of the behavior. –  Mr. F Mar 29 '12 at 13:32

Here's a one-liner if a is a numpy array:

>>> a[np.arange(len(a))!=3]
array([0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
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