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How do I check if a cursor is open or not? Because many times I am encountering the error 'Cursor already exists'. Please let me know how can I check whether a cursor is already in open status.

In fact I have closed as well as Deallocated it at the end (CLOSE ppm_cursor; DEALLOCATE ppm_cursor;) But Still i am getting the same error what could be the reason.

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"How can i ensure whether a cursor is not already in open status." Perhaps you should not be doing this. Generally, you should close every cursor every time you finish with it. You should never find a cursor left open. – S.Lott Sep 15 '11 at 12:11
4  
.... or avoid cursors in the first place! .... – marc_s Sep 15 '11 at 12:27
    
    
@s.Lott I have closed as well as Deallocated it at the end of file (CLOSE ppm_cursor; DEALLOCATE ppm_cursor;) But Still i am getting the same error what could be the reson. – Maddy Sep 16 '11 at 5:04
    
the error 'Cursor already exists' means that "I have closed as well as Deallocated it at the end of file" is wrong. You need to close as soon as possible. You need to write a TINY sample program which shows the error. And post the TINY sample program with the error message. The smallest program you can write which gives the error. – S.Lott Sep 16 '11 at 9:55
up vote 53 down vote accepted

You can use the CURSOR_STATUS function to determine its state.

IF CURSOR_STATUS('global','myCursor')>=-1
BEGIN
 DEALLOCATE myCursor
END
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Close the cursor, if it is empty then deallocate it:

IF (SELECT CURSOR_STATUS('global','myCursor')) >= -1
 BEGIN
  IF (SELECT CURSOR_STATUS('global','myCursor')) > -1
   BEGIN
    CLOSE myCursor
   END
 DEALLOCATE myCursor
END
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Good, but maybe consider adding a begin/end around the inner IF to avoid confusion about your intent. My first thought was you had forgotten one, then remembered SQL also doesn't require it for single lines... just a little confusion avoided – Andrew Backer Jan 6 '15 at 4:12
    
Updated, Thanks Andrew. – Prateek Jan 6 '15 at 6:54
    
Is it possible for the results of the two cursor status' to be different? – TEEKAY Aug 10 '15 at 15:24

Just Small change to what Gary W mentioned, adding 'SELECT':

IF (SELECT CURSOR_STATUS('global','myCursor')) >= -1
BEGIN
 DEALLOCATE myCursor
END

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/sqlgetstarted/thread/eb268010-75fd-4c04-9fe8-0bc33ccf9357

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1  
Should be IF (SELECT CURSOR_STATUS('global','myCursor')) >= -1 Note the position of the first open bracket. – WernerVA May 2 '14 at 7:30
    
Thanks. updated – Muhammad Omar ElShourbagy May 3 '14 at 19:30

One solution using a Dynamic Management function:

DECLARE crsA CURSOR LOCAL FAST_FORWARD FOR SELECT * FROM dbo.Factura ;
OPEN crsA;
DECLARE crsB CURSOR LOCAL FAST_FORWARD FOR SELECT * FROM dbo.Employee;


DECLARE @CursorName SYSNAME = 'crsA' --or 'crsB'
SELECT  f.is_open, f.*
FROM    sys.dm_exec_cursors(@@SPID) f
WHERE   f.name = @CursorName 

CLOSE crsA; DEALLOCATE crsA;
DEALLOCATE crsB;
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I rarely employ cursors, but I just discovered one other item that can bite you here, the scope of the cursor name.

If the database CURSOR_DEFAULT is global, you will get the "cursor already exists" error if you declare a cursor in a stored procedure with a particular name (eg "cur"), and while that cursor is open you call another stored procedure which declares and opens a cursor with the same name (eg "cur"). The error will occur in the nested stored procedure when it attempts to open "cur".

Run this bit of sql to see your CURSOR_DEFAULT:

select is_local_cursor_default from sys.databases where name = '[your database name]'

If this value is "0" then how you name your nested cursor matters!

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This happened to me when a stored procedure running in SSMS encountered an error during the loop, while the cursor was in use to iterate over records and before the it was closed. To fix it I added extra code in the CATCH block to close the cursor if it is still open (using CURSOR_STATUS as other answers here suggest).

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