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I have the following extension methods:

public static class QueryableOptionalDateRangeExtensions
{
    public static IQueryable<T> StartsFrom<T>(this IQueryable<T> query, DateTime date)
        where T : IOptionalDateRange // Might also be IRequiredDateRange
    {
        return query.Where(obj => obj.Start >= date);
    }

    public static IQueryable<T> StartsUntil<T>(this IQueryable<T> query, DateTime date)
        where T : IOptionalDateRange // Might also be IRequiredDateRange
    {
        return query.Where(obj => obj.Start < date);
    }

    public static IQueryable<T> EndsUntil<T>(this IQueryable<T> query, DateTime date)
        where T : IOptionalDateRange
    {
        return query.Where(obj => obj.End <= date);
    }
}

public static class QueryableRequiredDateRangeExtensions
{
    public static IQueryable<T> StartsFrom<T>(this IQueryable<T> query, DateTime date)
        where T : IRequiredDateRange
    {
        return query.Where(obj => obj.Start >= date);
    }

    public static IQueryable<T> StartsUntil<T>(this IQueryable<T> query, DateTime date)
        where T : IRequiredDateRange
    {
        return query.Where(obj => obj.Start < date);
    }

    public static IQueryable<T> EndsUntil<T>(this IQueryable<T> query, DateTime date)
        where T : IRequiredDateRange
    {
        return query.Where(obj => obj.End <= date);
    }
}

This however does not work since it can't infer the overloading from the type of T for some reason (although it seems possible to me).
What can be done to work around this issue?

EDIT:
Here's the IDateRange interface:

public interface IDateRange<TStart, TEnd>
{
    TStart Start { get; set; }
    TEnd End { get; set; }
}

It just specifies that the class has a start and an end. Now I want it to specify whether the object has an optional date range (both start and end are nullable) or a required date range (both are value types) but the same extension method must work on both and I don't really want to specify the Start and End properties' types.

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@Daniel Hilgarth: Already done, but IDateRange has two generic parameters for the Start & End properties (they might be nullable or not) and then you can't compare T to datetime. –  the_drow Sep 15 '11 at 12:30
    
Please post it as a comment to my answer - I will answer your comment there. –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 15 '11 at 12:31
    
You should think about that design. Your IDateRange says it is a date range, still, I could put anything in there, e.g. I could create an IDateRange<Guid, HttpContext>... –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 15 '11 at 12:38
    
You still haven't shown what's actually happening. A short but complete piece of code showing a single method declaration (rather than 4) and something trying to use it would be helpful. –  Jon Skeet Sep 15 '11 at 12:39
1  
Okay, to me that says the design needs to be re-thought (see my updated answer). Opening it up to any types just to support optional or required (a yes/no flag) doesn't feel right. –  Peter Kelly Sep 15 '11 at 13:12
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5 Answers

It's not clear what you mean by "does not work". Were you expecting overload resolution (including finding extension methods) to take account of the constraints? If so, that doesn't happen - I've written a blog post going into the details of this.

That's possibly why what you're trying isn't working - although as you haven't given an example, it's hard to say for sure. As for how to fix it - I would suggest using different method names, e.g. MaybeStartsFrom for the optional range. If you could give a short but complete example of what you're trying to achieve, that would help...

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Please see edit. –  the_drow Sep 15 '11 at 12:36
add comment

Make both IRequiredDateRange and IOptionalDateRange inherit from IDateRange and put the Start and End properties there. What you are trying can't be achieved otherwise, because "generic method type inference deliberately does not make any deductions from the constraints", see here.

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First, it T is always "IOptionalDateRange" in the methods of QueryableOptionalDateRangeExtensions, why make it generic in the first place?

Second, it seems the IOptionalDateRange interface simply extends the IRequiredDateRange interface (I guessed that because your wrote IOptionalDateRange might also be IRequiredDateRange). That means, if an object implements IOptionalDateRange, it also implements IRequiredDateRange. How do you expect the compiler to differentiate?

So solve this, the interface should not inherit each other, instead they could share a common base class.

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Because T must be the concrete type in order to be used in IQueryable. Both IOptionalDateRange and IRequiredDateRange inherit from IDateRange<TStart, TEnd>. I wrote that the constraint matches both IRequiredDateRange and IOptionalDateRange. –  the_drow Sep 15 '11 at 13:06
add comment

If you are on .NET 4 and implement the interfaces with classes (not structures), you can take advantage of covariance and make the methods non-generic. Instead you would have

IQueryable<IOptionalDateRange> EndsUntil(this IQueryable<IOptionalDateRange> query, DateTime date)
IQueryable<IRequiredDateRange> EndsUntil(this IQueryable<IRequiredDateRange> query, DateTime date)
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That would be the accepted answer if I were on .NET 4. However I'm not sure how NHibernate would take this. I believe that it will still cause an error. –  the_drow Sep 15 '11 at 13:21
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You could move them into separate namespaces but that would be BAD. It is fragile because changing namespaces could result in different behaviour (unexpectedly). Plus this won't work if you need to use both methods in the same file (as pointed out by Daniel).


Okay, so after reading your update why don't you add an IsDateOptional property to your IDateRange interface, define the date types as DateTime getting rid of the generic element to that interface. There is now no need for two separate interfaces IOptionalDateRange and IRequiredDateRange... and you can replace the two extension classes with one.

    public interface IDateRange
    {
        DateTime Start { get; set; }
        DateTime End { get; set; }
        bool IsDateOptional { get; }
    }

    public static class QueryableDateRangeExtensions
    {
        public static IQueryable<T> StartsFrom<T>(this IQueryable<T> query, DateTime date)
            where T : IDateRange
        {
            return query.Where(obj => obj.Start >= date);
        }

        public static IQueryable<T> StartsUntil<T>(this IQueryable<T> query, DateTime date)
            where T : IDateRange
        {
            return query.Where(obj => obj.Start < date);
        }

        public static IQueryable<T> EndsUntil<T>(this IQueryable<T> query, DateTime date)
            where T : IDateRange
        {
            return query.Where(obj => obj.End <= date);
        }
    }
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It's the way to extend IQueryable and make date range comparisons more comprehensible. –  the_drow Sep 15 '11 at 12:39
1  
"You could move them into separate namespaces". This failes as soon as he needs both in the same file. –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 15 '11 at 12:40
    
@Daniel Hilgarth: Which is why I said it was BAD :) –  Peter Kelly Sep 15 '11 at 12:42
    
I know that you said it. But you didn't say why ;-) –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 15 '11 at 12:43
    
Fair enough! Updated. –  Peter Kelly Sep 15 '11 at 12:45
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