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I would like to flatten arbitrary deeply nested collections/structures of elements of some type T in Java, optimally with

  • only having a live view and not a copied collection;
  • not only handling Collections, but also Iterator, arrays of T of arbitrary dimension, Iterable, and all these structures arbitrarily mixed and nested;
  • statical type-safety.

Is there a java library which can handle this?


Guava seems to only handle one nesting level, i.e. Collection<Collection<T>> --flatten--> Collection<T>.

lambdaj looks promising: can I somehow combine on(), asIterator() and flattenIterator() to achieve this? In a statically type-safe manner?

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Not based on either of the above, but perhaps a DeepIterator class that is constructed with a Collection whose next() method looks at the next Object and if it is a instanceof Collection then pushes the current iterator on Stack and recurses into that Collection's iterator. –  Miserable Variable Sep 15 '11 at 13:02
    
Yes, I've implemented some iterators that way. Having to make a case distinction for arrays of arbitrary dimensions and Iterators is pretty fiddly, though. And there is no static type-safety :( Since lambdaj probably implements it at least as good, I don't think I should do that implementation... –  DaveFar Sep 15 '11 at 13:13
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What do you mean static type safety here? Since the Collection (ADG actually) can contain elements of different types, the Iterator can only provide Objects. Am I missing something? –  Miserable Variable Sep 15 '11 at 13:23
    
At least for all arbitrarily deeply nested Collections you can detect at compile time that the leafs are all of type T. Since lambdaj offers a lot of functions that feel dynamically typed (e.g. invoking a method on each item), but are actually still statically typed, I hope lambdaj can handle even more structures and checks at compile time. –  DaveFar Sep 15 '11 at 13:37
    
DeepIterator aproach sounds promising, but I don't think you can achieve general and statical type-safety solution. I don't see how you can even express such entity in Java. –  Jarek Przygódzki Sep 15 '11 at 13:39
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Guava will probably support this eventually :

http://code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/issues/detail?id=174

(It might be easiest to read that from the bottom up, since the thinking on it has shifted a few times over its lifetime.)

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Not based on either of the above, but perhaps a DeepIterator class that is constructed with a Collection whose next() method looks at the next Object and if it is a instanceof Collection then pushes the current iterator on Stack and recurses into that Collection's iterator.

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I'm having a deja-vu reading your post ;) But it's a good idea to give it as a real answer - let's see its votes... –  DaveFar Sep 15 '11 at 13:52
    
@DaveBall If I can be downvoted for a correct answer maybe I can upvoted for an partial answer :) –  Miserable Variable Sep 15 '11 at 14:03
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I think this may help: Arrays.deepToString(myCollection.toArray())

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For retrieving Strings, yes. For retrieving elements of type T, this unfortunately does not help. –  DaveFar Sep 15 '11 at 13:39
    
@daveball i think it would still work, you wanna check code for deepToString and also depends on whether type T has implemented toString –  Suraj Chandran Sep 15 '11 at 13:46
    
toString() is already exported in Object... –  DaveFar Sep 15 '11 at 13:49
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deepToString() does not handle Arrays either. That is, if one of the elements is an Array the it will call toString on it, not Arrays.deepToString. Strange but true. –  Miserable Variable Sep 15 '11 at 13:59
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@DaveBall I think Suraj means getDeclaredMethods() which will tell you if the Class implements toString() itself. But I don't know how that helps. You are not interested in knowing what the string representation of the object is, you want an Iterator over all the objects –  Miserable Variable Sep 15 '11 at 14:02
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