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My csv data looking like this:

heading1,heading2,heading3,heading4,heading5,value1_1,value2_1,value3_1,value4_1,value5_1,value1_2,value2_2,value3_2,value4_2,value5_2....

How to read this data and convert an array like this:

[heading1:value1_1 , heading2:value2_1, heading3 : value3_1, heading4 : value4_1, heading5 : value5_1 ],[heading1:value1_2 , heading2:value2_2, heading3 : value3_2, heading4 : value4_2, heading5 : value5_2 ]....

Using javascript?? I've tried this code but no luck..!:

<script type="text/javascript">
    var allText =[];
    var allTextLines = [];
    var Lines = [];

    var txtFile = new XMLHttpRequest();
    txtFile.open("GET", "file://d:/data.txt", true);
    txtFile.onreadystatechange = function()
    {
        allText = txtFile.responseText;
        allTextLines = allText.split(/\r\n|\n/);
    };

    document.write(allTextLines);<br>
    document.write(allText);<br>
    document.write(txtFile);<br>
</script>
share|improve this question
    
Without line breaks in your CSV file, it will be impossible for any JavaScript code to know where one array (or object) stops and the other begins (unless you know in advance that there are always exactly five headings). Was this a cut-and-paste oversight? –  Blazemonger Sep 15 '11 at 13:05
    
Yes, I know in advance that there are Exactly Five Fields. –  Mahesh Thumar Sep 15 '11 at 13:06
    
Next question: is jQuery allowed in the solution? You used the tag but your sample code is pure JavaScript. –  Blazemonger Sep 15 '11 at 13:08
    
yes, jQuery is allowed, That's why I include it in Tag. –  Mahesh Thumar Sep 15 '11 at 13:17
    
I don't think the use of file://... is allowed for XMLHttpRequest. –  dashmug Oct 26 '12 at 7:05
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5 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

NOTE: I concocted this solution before I was reminded about all the "special cases" that can occur in a valid CSV file, like escaped quotes. I'm leaving my answer for those who want something quick and dirty, but I recommend Evan's answer for accuracy.


This code will work when your data.txt file is one long string of comma-separated entries, with no newlines:

data.txt:

 heading1,heading2,heading3,heading4,heading5,value1_1,...,value5_2

javascript:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "data.txt",
        dataType: "text",
        success: function(data) {processData(data);}
     });
});

function processData(allText) {
    var record_num = 5;  // or however many elements there are in each row
    var allTextLines = allText.split(/\r\n|\n/);
    var entries = allTextLines[0].split(',');
    var lines = [];

    var headings = entries.splice(0,record_num);
    while (entries.length>0) {
        var tarr = [];
        for (var j=0; j<record_num; j++) {
            tarr.push(headings[j]+":"+entries.shift());
        }
        lines.push(tarr);
    }
    // alert(lines);
}

The following code will work on a "true" CSV file with linebreaks between each set of records:

data.txt:

heading1,heading2,heading3,heading4,heading5
value1_1,value2_1,value3_1,value4_1,value5_1
value1_2,value2_2,value3_2,value4_2,value5_2

javascript:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "data.txt",
        dataType: "text",
        success: function(data) {processData(data);}
     });
});

function processData(allText) {
    var allTextLines = allText.split(/\r\n|\n/);
    var headers = allTextLines[0].split(',');
    var lines = [];

    for (var i=1; i<allTextLines.length; i++) {
        var data = allTextLines[i].split(',');
        if (data.length == headers.length) {

            var tarr = [];
            for (var j=0; j<headers.length; j++) {
                tarr.push(headers[j]+":"+data[j]);
            }
            lines.push(tarr);
        }
    }
    // alert(lines);
}

http://jsfiddle.net/mblase75/dcqxr/

share|improve this answer
    
By the way, this assumes that the CSV file does in fact have multiple rows -- that's what the allText.split(/\r\n|\n/) splits on. If all your data is in fact one long string of comma-separated data with no newlines, it's not a real CSV file. –  Blazemonger Sep 15 '11 at 13:28
    
Hi I've use this Code: But there is no output. Just a blank alert displayed. my file is look like: heading1,heading2,heading3,heading4,heading5,value1_1,value2_1,value3_1,value4_1‌​,value5_1,value1_2,value2_2,value3_2,value4_2,value5_2 Both csv.html and data.txt are in same folder –  Mahesh Thumar Sep 15 '11 at 13:29
    
If this is not correct file(or data) then how should my file look like?? –  Mahesh Thumar Sep 15 '11 at 13:36
    
updated answer with new code –  Blazemonger Sep 15 '11 at 13:37
3  
The code may not handle all valid IETF standard CSV files, and may fail if there are strings which have embedded commas, line breaks or double quotes. For instance, 1, "IETF allows ""quotes"", commas and \nline breaks" which is allowed since the string is surrounded with double quotes, and the double quotes are escaped. –  user645715 Apr 12 '12 at 1:39
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No need to write your own...

The jQuery-CSV library has a function called $.csv.toObjects(csv) that does the mapping automatically.

Note: The library is designed to handle any CSV data that is RFC 4180 compliant, including all of the nasty edge cases that most 'simple' solutions overlook.

Like @Blazemonger already stated, first you need to add line breaks to make the data valid CSV.

Using the following dataset:

heading1,heading2,heading3,heading4,heading5
value1_1,value2_1,value3_1,value4_1,value5_1
value1_2,value2_2,value3_2,value4_2,value5_2

Use the code:

var data = $.csv.toObjects(csv):

The output saved in 'data' will be:

[
  { heading1:"value1_1",heading2:"value2_1",heading3:"value3_1",heading4:"value4_1",heading5:"value5_1" } 
  { heading1:"value1_2",heading2:"value2_2",heading3:"value3_2",heading4:"value4_2",heading5:"value5_2" }
]

Note: Technically, the way you wrote the key-value mapping is invalid JavaScript. The objects containing the key-value pairs should be wrapped in brackets.

If you want to try it out for yourself, I suggest you take a look at the Basic Usage Demonstration under the 'toObjects()' tab.

Disclaimer: I'm the original author of jQuery-CSV.

Update:

Edited to use the dataset that the op provided and included a link to the demo where the data can be tested for validity.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for introducing me to the library- it's slick! –  DanDan Jan 7 '13 at 6:01
1  
@DanDan I'm just happy it can be useful to others. –  Evan Plaice Jan 7 '13 at 7:07
    
IOW, "toObject" is or can be thought of as "toJSON", no? And, is the colon following the call to toObjects(csv) a typo? IOW, shouldn't that be a semicolon? –  B. Clay Shannon Jul 31 '13 at 15:27
    
@ClayShannon toJSON() (ie JSON.stringify()) implies that the CSV data is parsed and outputted in string format (ie text/json). toObjects actually maps the CSV into memory as an array of objects where the column names are used as the key names. $.csv.toObjects() is the CSV equivalent to JSON.parse(). The output above is just the simplify what the data would look like in memory. –  Evan Plaice Aug 1 '13 at 19:15
    
Is CSV a file name ? –  bubble Sep 16 '13 at 8:42
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Don't split on commas -- it won't work for most CSV files, and this question has wayyyy too many views for the asker's kind of input data to apply to everyone's inputs.

This question is old, but I believe there's a better solution now that Papa Parse is available. It's a jQuery plugin I wrote (with help from several contributors) that parses CSV text or files. It's the only JS library I know of that supports files that are hundreds of MB in size (even GB).

Parsing text is very easy:

var results = $.parse(csvString);

Parsing files is also easy:

$('input[type=file]').parse({
    complete: function(data) {
        console.log("Parse results:", data.results);
    }
});

Streaming files is similar:

$('input[type=file]').parse({
    config: {
        step: function(data, file, inputElem) {
            console.log("Row data:", data.results);
            console.log("Row errors:", data.errors);
        }
    },
    complete: function() {
        console.log("All done!");
    }
});

Papa can auto-detect delimiters and match values up with header columns, if a header row is present. It can also turn numeric values into actual number types. It appropriately parses line breaks and quotes and other weird situations, and even handles malformed input as robustly as possible. I've drawn on inspiration from existing libraries to make Papa, so props to other JS implementations.

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Per the accepted answer,

I got this to work by changing the 1 to a 0 here:

for (var i=1; i<allTextLines.length; i++) {

changed to

for (var i=0; i<allTextLines.length; i++) {

It will compute the a file with one continuous line as having an allTextLines.length of 1. So if the loop starts at 1 and runs as long as it's less than 1, it never runs. Hence the blank alert box.

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Here's a JavaScript function that parses CSV data, accounting for commas found inside quotes.

// Parse a CSV row, accounting for commas inside quotes                   
function parse(row){
  var insideQuote = false,                                             
      entries = [],                                                    
      entry = [];
  row.split('').forEach(function (character) {                         
    if(character === '"') {
      insideQuote = !insideQuote;                                      
    } else {
      if(character == "," && !insideQuote) {                           
        entries.push(entry.join(''));                                  
        entry = [];                                                    
      } else {
        entry.push(character);                                         
      }                                                                
    }                                                                  
  });
  entries.push(entry.join(''));                                        
  return entries;                                                      
}

Example use of the function to parse a CSV file that looks like this:

"foo, the column",bar
2,3
"4, the value",5

into arrays:

// csv could contain the content read from a csv file
var csv = '"foo, the column",bar\n2,3\n"4, the value",5',

    // Split the input into lines
    lines = csv.split('\n'),

    // Extract column names from the first line
    columnNamesLine = lines[0],
    columnNames = parse(columnNamesLine),

    // Extract data from subsequent lines
    dataLines = lines.slice(1),
    data = dataLines.map(parse);

// Prints ["foo, the column","bar"]
console.log(JSON.stringify(columnNames));

// Prints [["2","3"],["4, the value","5"]]
console.log(JSON.stringify(data));

Here's how you can transform the data into objects, like D3's csv parser (which is a solid third party solution):

var dataObjects = data.map(function (arr) {
  var dataObject = {};
  columnNames.forEach(function(columnName, i){
    dataObject[columnName] = arr[i];
  });
  return dataObject;
});

// Prints [{"foo":"2","bar":"3"},{"foo":"4","bar":"5"}]
console.log(JSON.stringify(dataObjects));

Here's a working fiddle of this code.

Enjoy! --Curran

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