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i want to print "CLIENT>" on stdout in c, without new line.
printf("CLIENT>");
does not print enything. how do i solve this?

int main (){
printf("CLIENT>");
}
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3 Answers 3

Try fflush(stdout); after your printf.

You can also investigate setvbuf if you find yourself calling fflush frequently and want to avoid having to call it altogether. Be aware that if you are writing lots of output to standard output then there will probably be a performance penalty to using setvbuf.

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1  
+1 for also mentioning setvbuf. –  jweyrich Sep 15 '11 at 13:18
    
Thank you vary much...:) –  Hashan Sep 15 '11 at 13:21
    
he asked without a newline. printf still prints a newline regardless of flushing. –  Trevor Hickey Apr 3 '13 at 16:13
1  
printf does not include a newline automatically. For example, you can write printf("abc");printf("def"); and the string abcdef will appear (with no newlines in the middle or at the end) on the standard output. –  Dave Goodell Apr 4 '13 at 17:27
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Call fflush after printf():

int main (){
    printf("CLIENT>");
    fflush( stdout );
}
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Thanx alot... :) –  Hashan Sep 15 '11 at 13:23
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On some compilers/runtime libraries (usually the older ones) you have to call fflush to have the data physically written:

#include <stdio.h>
int main( void )
{
  printf("CLIENT>");
  fflush(stdout);
  return 0;
}

If the data has newline in the end, usually fflush isn't needed - even on the older systems.

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Thank you vary much...:) –  Hashan Sep 15 '11 at 13:21
    
"Usually the old ones"? Not true. It's a feature known as buffering which is employed in most if not all modern environments, and which in fact might be lacking in older systems (although I can't think of any!) –  gamen Sep 16 '11 at 11:16
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