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I need to emulate a do-while loop in a python. But, unfortunately, following straightforward code does not work:

l = [ 1, 2, 3 ]
i = l.__iter__()
s = None
while True :
  if s :
    print s
  try :
    s = i.next()
  except StopIteration :
    break
print "done"

Instead of "1,2,3,done" I have the following output:

[stdout:]1
[stdout:]2
[stdout:]3
None['Traceback (most recent call last):
', '  File "test_python.py", line 8, in <module>
    s = i.next()
', 'StopIteration
']

What can I do in order to catch 'stop iteration' excepton and break a while loop properly?

Example why such thing may be needed. State machine:

s = ""
while True :
  if state is STATE_CODE :
    if "//" in s :
      tokens.add( TOKEN_COMMENT, s.split( "//" )[1] )
      state = STATE_COMMENT
    else :
      tokens.add( TOKEN_CODE, s )
  if state is STATE_COMMENT :
    if "//" in s :
      tokens.append( TOKEN_COMMENT, s.split( "//" )[1] )
    else
      state = STATE_CODE
      # re-evaluate same line
      continue
  try :
    s = i.next()
  except StopIteration :
    break
share|improve this question
    
See my updated post. –  Tom Apr 13 '09 at 7:54
1  
Is this homework? Why on earth would you want a "do once" loop? –  S.Lott Apr 13 '09 at 10:11
17  
S. Lott: I'm pretty sure his question was about how to implement do while in python. So, I wouldn't expect his code to be completely correct. Also, he is very close to a do while... he is checking a condition at the end of the "forever" loop to see if he should break out. It's not "do-forever". –  Tom Apr 13 '09 at 18:43
2  
so ... your initial example code actually works for me with no problem and i don't get that traceback. that's a proper idiom for a do while loop where the break condition is iterator exhaustion. typically, you'd set s=i.next() rather than None and possibly do some initial work rather than just make your first pass through the loop useless though. –  underrun Sep 21 '11 at 19:31
2  
@underrun Unfortunately, the post is not tagged with which version of Python was being used - the original snippet works for me too using 2.7, presumably due to updates to the Python language itself. –  Hannele Oct 2 '12 at 17:55

11 Answers 11

up vote 263 down vote accepted

I am not sure what you are trying to do. You can implement a do-while loop like this:

while True:
  stuff()
  if fail_condition:
    break

Or:

stuff()
while not fail_condition:
  stuff()

What are you doing trying to use a do while loop to print the stuff in the list? Why not just use:

for i in l:
  print i
print "done"

Update:

So do you have a list of lines? And you want to keep iterating through it? How about:

for s in l: 
  while True: 
    stuff() 
    # use a "break" instead of s = i.next()

Does that seem like something close to what you would want? With your code example, it would be:

for s in some_list:
  while True :
    if state is STATE_CODE :
      if "//" in s :
        tokens.add( TOKEN_COMMENT, s.split( "//" )[1] )
        state = STATE_COMMENT
      else :
        tokens.add( TOKEN_CODE, s )
    if state is STATE_COMMENT :
      if "//" in s :
        tokens.append( TOKEN_COMMENT, s.split( "//" )[1] )
        break # get next s
      else
        state = STATE_CODE
        # re-evaluate same line
        # continues automatically
share|improve this answer
    
i need to create a state machine. In state machine it's a normal case to re-evaluate CURRENT statement, so i need to 'continue' without iterating next item. I don't know how to do such thing in 'for s in l:' iteration :(. In do-while loop, 'continue' will re-evaluate current item, iteration at end –  Eye of Hell Apr 13 '09 at 6:41
    
Do you mean you need to keep track of your place in the list? That way when you return the same state, you can pick up where you left off? Give a bit more context. It seems like you might be better off using an index into the list. –  Tom Apr 13 '09 at 6:48
    
pseudocode example added –  Eye of Hell Apr 13 '09 at 7:32
    
Thanks, I commented on your pseudocode... your example seems sort of bad since you seem to handle "//" the same way no matter what state you are in. Also, is this real code where you are processing comments? What if you have strings with slashes? ie: print "blah // <-- does that mess you up?" –  Tom Apr 13 '09 at 7:44
    
That was a sample pseudocode, just to illustrate a concept why it is needed to process same line more than once. But your sample with for ... + While True seems VERY good to me and solves the exact task i have: 'break' goes to next item and 'continue' re-evaluates same item. –  Eye of Hell Apr 13 '09 at 8:32

Here's a very simple way to emulate a do-while loop:

condition = True
while condition:
    # loop body here
    condition = test_loop_condition()
# end of loop

The key features of a do-while loop are that the loop body always executes at least once, and that the condition is evaluated at the bottom of the loop body. The control structure show here accomplishes both of these with no need for exceptions or break statements. It does introduce one extra Boolean variable.

share|improve this answer
8  
It doesn't always add an extra boolean variable. Often there's something(s) that already exist whose state can be tested. –  martineau Oct 2 '12 at 17:32
4  
The reason I like this solution the most is that it doesn't add another condition, it still is just one cycle, and if you pick a good name for the helper variable the whole structure is quite clear. –  Roberto Oct 8 '13 at 21:04
    
NOTE: While this does address the original question, this approach is less flexible than using break. Specifically, if there is logic needed AFTER test_loop_condition(), that should not be executed once we are done, it has to be wrapped in if condition:. BTW, condition is vague. More descriptive: more or notDone. –  ToolmakerSteve Dec 15 '13 at 0:30

Exception will break the loop, so you might as well handle it outside the loop.

try:
  while True:
    if s:
      print s
    s = i.next()
except StopIteration:   
  pass

I guess that the problem with your code is that behaviour of break inside except is not defined. Generally break goes only one level up, so e.g. break inside try goes directly to finally (if it exists) an out of the try, but not out of the loop.

Related PEP: http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-3136
Related question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/653509/breaking-out-of-nested-loops

share|improve this answer
3  
It's good practice though to only have inside the try statement what you expect to throw your exception, lest you catch unwanted exceptions. –  Paggas Nov 2 '09 at 18:10
4  
@PiPeep: RTFM, search for EAFP. –  vartec Nov 4 '10 at 9:35
1  
@vartec My apologies, I am new to Python –  PiPeep Nov 7 '10 at 19:47
2  
@PiPeep: no problem, just keep in mind, that what's true for some languages, may not be true for other. Python is optimized for intensive use of exceptions. –  vartec Nov 10 '10 at 16:30
4  
break and continue are perfectly well-defined in any clause of a try/except/finally statement. They simply ignore them, and either break out of or move on to the next iteration of the containing while or for loop as appropriate. As components of the looping constructs, they're only relevant to while and for statements, and trigger a syntax error if they run into a class or def statement before reaching the innermost loop. They ignore if, with and try statements. –  ncoghlan Feb 18 '11 at 6:41
do {
  stuff()
} while (condition())

->

while True:
  stuff()
  if not condition():
    break

You can do a function:

def do_while(stuff, condition):
  while condition(stuff()):
    pass

But 1) It's ugly. 2) Condition should be a function with one parameter, supposed to be filled by stuff (it's the only reason not to use the classic while loop.)

share|improve this answer
2  
Writing while True: stuff(); if not condition(): break is a very good idea. Thank you! –  Noctis Skytower Sep 11 '12 at 20:05

Here is a crazier solution of a different pattern -- using coroutines. The code is still very similar, but with one important difference; there are no exit conditions at all! The coroutine (chain of coroutines really) just stops when you stop feeding it with data.

def coroutine(func):
    """Coroutine decorator

    Coroutines must be started, advanced to their first "yield" point,
    and this decorator does this automatically.
    """
    def startcr(*ar, **kw):
        cr = func(*ar, **kw)
        cr.next()
        return cr
    return startcr

@coroutine
def collector(storage):
    """Act as "sink" and collect all sent in @storage"""
    while True:
        storage.append((yield))

@coroutine      
def state_machine(sink):
    """ .send() new parts to be tokenized by the state machine,
    tokens are passed on to @sink
    """ 
    s = ""
    state = STATE_CODE
    while True: 
        if state is STATE_CODE :
            if "//" in s :
                sink.send((TOKEN_COMMENT, s.split( "//" )[1] ))
                state = STATE_COMMENT
            else :
                sink.send(( TOKEN_CODE, s ))
        if state is STATE_COMMENT :
            if "//" in s :
                sink.send(( TOKEN_COMMENT, s.split( "//" )[1] ))
            else
                state = STATE_CODE
                # re-evaluate same line
                continue
        s = (yield)

tokens = []
sm = state_machine(collector(tokens))
for piece in i:
    sm.send(piece)

The code above collects all tokens as tuples in tokens and I assume there is no difference between .append() and .add() in the original code.

share|improve this answer
1  
How would you write this in Python 3.x today? –  Noctis Skytower Sep 11 '12 at 20:07

for a do - while loop containing try statements

loop = True
while loop:
    generic_stuff()
    try:
        questionable_stuff()
#       to break from successful completion
#       loop = False  
    except:
        optional_stuff()
#       to break from unsuccessful completion - 
#       the case referenced in the OP's question
        loop = False
   finally:
        more_generic_stuff()

alternatively, when there's no need for the 'finally' clause

while True:
    generic_stuff()
    try:
        questionable_stuff()
#       to break from successful completion
#       break  
    except:
        optional_stuff()
#       to break from unsuccessful completion - 
#       the case referenced in the OP's question
        break
share|improve this answer
while condition is True: 
  stuff()
else:
  stuff()
share|improve this answer
4  
Ew. That seems significantly uglier than using a break. –  mattdm Jan 26 '12 at 14:42
2  
That is clever, but it requires stuff to be a function or for the code body to be repeated. –  Noctis Skytower Sep 11 '12 at 20:08
6  
All that's needed is while condition: because is True is implied. –  martineau Oct 2 '12 at 18:15
    
this fails if condition depends on some inner variable of stuff(), because that variable is not defined at that moment. –  yo' Feb 25 at 20:23

Quick hack:

def dowhile(func = None, condition = None):
    if not func or not condition:
        return
    else:
        func()
        while condition():
            func()

Use like so:

>>> x = 10
>>> def f():
...     global x
...     x = x - 1
>>> def c():
        global x
        return x > 0
>>> dowhile(f, c)
>>> print x
0
share|improve this answer

Why don't you just do

for s in l :
    print s
print "done"

?

share|improve this answer
    
i need to create a state machine. In state machine it's a normal case to re-evaluate CURRENT statement, so i need to 'continue' without iterating next item. I don't know how to do such thing in 'for s in l:' iteration :(. In do-while loop, 'continue' will re-evaluate current item, iteration at end. –  Eye of Hell Apr 13 '09 at 6:26
    
then, can you define some pseudo-code for your state machine, so we can hint you towards the best pythonic solution ? I don't know much about state machines(and am probably not the only one), so if you tell us a bit about your algorithm, this will be easier for us to help you. –  Martin Apr 13 '09 at 6:48
    
pseudocode example added –  Eye of Hell Apr 13 '09 at 7:29
    
For loop does not work for things like: a = fun() while a == 'zxc': sleep(10) a = fun() –  harry Sep 19 '13 at 7:26

Thought this might be a useful implementation highlighting the main difference between do - while vs while as I understand it. That in one case you always go through the loop at least once.

firstPass = True
while firstPass or Condition:
    firstPass = False
    do_stuff()
share|improve this answer

See if this helps :

Set a flag inside the exception handler and check it before working on the s.

flagBreak = false;
while True :

    if flagBreak : break

    if s :
        print s
    try :
        s = i.next()
    except StopIteration :
        flagBreak = true

print "done"
share|improve this answer
2  
Could be simplified by using while not flagBreak: and removing the if (flagBreak) : break. –  martineau Oct 2 '12 at 18:23
    
I avoid variables named flag--I am unable to infer what a True value or False value mean. Instead, use done or endOfIteration. The code turns into while not done: .... –  IceArdor Mar 11 at 20:03

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