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I'm trying to construct the following 14*14 array i C: [I 0; 0 -I], that is a 7*7 identity matrix upper left, minus the identity lower right and zeros otherwise.

This is the method:

#define DIM 7

 double S[2*DIM][2*DIM];

 for(i = 0; i < DIM; i++){
     for(j = 0; j < DIM; j++){
         if(i == j){
             S[i][j] = 1.0;
             S[i+7][j+7] = -1.0;
         }
         else{
             S[i][j] = 0.0;
         }
     } 
 } 

This works fine for all the diagonal elements; however, some elements of the array get initialized to crazy values; for example, 13,6 gets initialized to

68111186113812079535019899599437200576833320031036694798491976301968333351950125611739840800974137748034248687763243996679617222196278187875968953700681881752083957666277350377710107236511681624408064.000000

This seems to be happening consistently (at least thrice) to entries 11,13, 12,9, 12,10, 13,12 and 13,6.

Can anybody tell me what's at play here or provide an alternative solution?

Cheers!

EDIT: The weird entries aren't consistent.

EDIT2: Typo: 13,12, not 13,15

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1  
removed, sorry... –  Alex Farber Sep 15 '11 at 13:43
    
How are you getting 13,15 with that? –  cwallenpoole Sep 15 '11 at 13:44

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your loop only covers the upper left quadrant, so the off-diagonal elements in the other quadrants are not initialized and contain garbage. Your loop should go up to 2*DIM for each dimension, so that the off-diagonal elements are zeroed, and then your conditional for the diagonal elements should just be a little more complex to decide which value to set the diagonal element to.

Note that [13, 15] is entirely outside of this array!

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Of course. I'm not feeling too smart now, let me tell you that ;-) –  trolle3000 Sep 15 '11 at 13:57

You can initialize the whole array with zeros, then set only the diagonal

double S[2*DIM][2*DIM] = {0};
for (i = 0; i < DIM; i++) {
    s[i][i] = 1;
    s[i + DIM][i + DIM] = -1;
}
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ITYM double S[2*DIM][2*DIM] = { { 0 } }; –  Paul R Sep 15 '11 at 13:51
    
@Paul: your version may be more explicit, but = {0} "works" for initializing anything -- eg int k = {0};, struct whatever obj[2][15] = {0};, .... I like to call it the universal zero initializer :-) –  pmg Sep 15 '11 at 13:56
    
It may work, but it generates warnings from gcc with -Wall: warning: missing braces around initializer warning: (near initialization for ‘S[0]’) –  Paul R Sep 15 '11 at 15:32
    
Yep ... gcc can be too helpful sometimes. I have -Wno-missing-braces added to my gcc alias because of that. –  pmg Sep 15 '11 at 15:37
    
6.7.8/19 in n1256.pdf: "... all subobjects that are not initialized explicitly shall be initialized implicitly ..." –  pmg Sep 15 '11 at 15:48

You are never writing to s[i][j] for i != j and i >= DIM or j >= DIM. If your array has automatic storage (is "local") it contains arbitrary init values.

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It would contain garbage if it were malloced as well. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Sep 15 '11 at 13:48
    
Yes, but it isn't malloced: double S[2*DIM][2*DIM]; –  undur_gongor Sep 15 '11 at 21:32
    
My point is that however it were to be allocated -- on the stack, or on the heap -- it contains garbage, so that most of your second sentence is redundant. The fact that it's automatic is immaterial. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Sep 15 '11 at 21:53
    
Sorry, I was taught variables (and arrays) with static storage are initialized to 0 automatically. Is this not true? –  undur_gongor Sep 15 '11 at 21:59

I would say most of the elements that are outside 7x7 will not be initialized at all unless i == j (diagonal elements).

What do you want to initialize them to?

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That's because your not initializing those elements. Here is some better code:

#define DIM 14

double S[DIM][DIM];

for (i = 0; i < DIM; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < DIM; j++) {
        if (i == j) {
            if (i < 7) {
                S[i][j] = 1.0;
            } else {
                S[i][j] = -1.0;
            }
        } else {
            S[i][j] = 0.0;
        }
    } 
}
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You never initialize values with an i or j between DIM + 1 and 2*DIM. So when you look at a value stored in one of those positions, you see whatever was there before that space was accessed by your matrix.

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1  
Off by one error... ;-) –  DevSolar Sep 15 '11 at 13:47

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