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I'm building a plugin to a windows service I've made (it's C#, uses plugins to do certain functionality). This new plugin will be using Web Services to make calls to a web-service and get some information.

Unfortunately, the web-service URL is different for my DEV, QC, and PRODUCTION environments. I'd like to make that end-point URL be configurable (the plugin will look into the database and get the URL).

How, exactly, do I set up a web-service caller in my code so that it can use a dynamic endpoint?

I can add a service and point to the existing one in DEV - and that builds up my proxy class - but how can I make it so it's not "hard locked" with the URL - so the plugin works in any environment (based on the URL in the database it pulls out)? I'd like to be able to change that on the fly in the code, so to speak.

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Basically you can call this to create your WCF Service client:

MyClient = new MyWCFClient(new BasicHttpBinding("CustomBinding"), new EndpointAddress(GetEndpointFromDatabase()));

Where GetEndpointFromDatabase() returns a string - the endpoint.

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I made an end to end sample which runs in LINQPad. This is for a completely self-hosted scenario, and enables exploring various bindings, etc (for both the client and the server). Hope it's not over the top and posted the entire sample in case you find any of the other aspects helpful later on.


void Main()
{
    MainService();
}
// Client
void MainClient()
{
    ChannelFactory cf = new ChannelFactory(new WebHttpBinding(), "http://localhost:8000");
    cf.Endpoint.Behaviors.Add(new WebHttpBehavior());
    IService channel = cf.CreateChannel();
    Console.WriteLine(channel.GetMessage("Get"));
    Console.WriteLine(channel.PostMessage("Post"));
    Console.Read();
}
// Service
void MainService()
{
    WebServiceHost host = new WebServiceHost(typeof(Service), new Uri("http://localhost:8080"));
    ServiceEndpoint ep = host.AddServiceEndpoint(typeof(IService),new WebHttpBinding(), "");
    ServiceDebugBehavior stp = host.Description.Behaviors.Find();
    stp.HttpHelpPageEnabled = false;
    stp.IncludeExceptionDetailInFaults = true;
    host.Open();
    Console.WriteLine("Service is up and running");
    Console.ReadLine();
    host.Close();    
}
// IService.cs
[ServiceContract]
public interface IService
{
    [OperationContract]
    [WebInvoke(Method="GET", BodyStyle = WebMessageBodyStyle.Bare, RequestFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json, ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json)]
    string GetMessage(string inputMessage);

    [OperationContract]
    [WebInvoke(Method="POST", BodyStyle = WebMessageBodyStyle.Bare, RequestFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json, ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json)]
    string PostMessage(string inputMessage);

    [OperationContract]
    [WebInvoke(Method="POST", BodyStyle = WebMessageBodyStyle.Bare, RequestFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json, ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json)]
    System.IO.Stream PostJson(System.IO.Stream json);
}
// Service.cs
public class Service : IService
{
    public string GetMessage(string inputMessage){
        Console.WriteLine(inputMessage);
        return "Calling Get for you " + inputMessage;
    }
    public string PostMessage(string inputMessage){
        Console.WriteLine(inputMessage);
        return "Calling Post for you " + inputMessage;
    }
    public System.IO.Stream PostJson (System.IO.Stream json) {
        Console.WriteLine(new System.IO.StreamReader(json).ReadToEnd());
        return json;
    }
}
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Can't you just put the URI inside the .config file? You can just change the URI when it's debug or release by having different URI inside .debug.config and .release.config.

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Yes, but it means that there's an extra step in deployment. With this way, we can just tell engineering "drop this DLL in this folder" and makes it less "risky", less steps. – Jason Sep 15 '11 at 16:36

Just set the url point

TheWebservice.Url = TheUrlFromTheDatabase;
share|improve this answer
    
There is no .URL property, this is a WCF service reference. – Jason Sep 15 '11 at 16:52

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