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I have a for loop that does 24 total iterations each representing a single hour of the day and then checks each 15 minute interval in another nested for loop. An additional nest checks a List for the hour and minute value and then aggregates some of the items in my List if they meet my time requirement. The issue is that my List can contain up to 1 million records which means that I traverse 1 million records 24*4 times.

How can I optimize my code for faster performance in this case? I know this could probably be simplified with LINQ statements but I'm not sure it would make it faster. Here's an example of what I am doing.

List<SummaryData> Aggregates = new List<SummaryData>();
for(int startHour = 0; startHour < 24; startHour++)
{
   for(int startMin = 0; startMin < 60; startMin+= 15)
   {
      int aggregateData = 0;
      //My ItemList can have up to 1 million records.
      foreach(ListItem item in ItemList)
      {
         if((item.time.Hour == startHour)&&(item.time.Minute == startMinute))
         {
            aggregateData += item.number;
         }
      }
         SummaryData aggregate = new SummaryData { SummaryId = item.id, TotalNumber = aggregateData
         Aggregates.Add(aggregate);

   }
}
class SummaryData
{
   public int SummaryId {get; set;}
   public int TotalNumber {get; set;}
}
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Use lamda expression for comparing. –  Emaad Ali Sep 15 '11 at 16:06
1  
Simply use Linq GroupBy and Sum extensions :) –  sehe Sep 15 '11 at 16:07
    
Consider changing your structures, for instance change to a sorted list or a hash map. –  K-ballo Sep 15 '11 at 16:07
    
I can't get meaning of outer loop. Doesn't it cover all possible values for Hours? –  Andrey Sep 15 '11 at 16:10
    
I'm not entirely sure that you're trying to accomplish (I'm a bit tired), so without that understanding it seems like it should be possible to move your outer loops into the inner loop (e.g. run your 24*4 tests on each list item, not 24*4 tests on the whole list). –  ZachS Sep 15 '11 at 16:11

6 Answers 6

Instead of looking for each Hour and Minute in every single item, iterate over ItemList just once and act based on each item.time.Hour and item.time.Minute.

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Given your logic above, you should only have to iterate the list one time. You can nest your for loops within the foreach and likely achieve better performance. I would also use a Dictionary to hold your aggregate data, and base its key on the total minute (meaning hour * 60 + minute).

Dictionary<int, AggregateDate> aggregate = new Dictionary<int, AggregateData>();

foreach(ListItem item in ItemList)
{
    int key = item.Hour * 60 + item.Minute;

    AggregateData data;

    if(!aggregate.TryGetValue(key, out data))
    {
        aggregate.Add(key, data = new AggregateData());
    }

    data.Number += item.Number;
}
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I think the more efficient method would be to use the Sum extension after Grouping. I do think it could be simpler to use the int key like you propose, but that is trivially easy to change in the Linq approach –  sehe Sep 15 '11 at 16:25
1  
@sehe: The LINQ solution may be more readable, but since the OP was looking for optimization, this should be faster (LINQ will introduce intermediate storage objects when grouping). –  Adam Robinson Sep 15 '11 at 18:07

I'd be organizing the data roughly like this:

(see also: http://ideone.com/dyfoD)

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class P
{
    struct DataItem
    {
        public System.DateTime time;
        public int number;
    }

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var ItemList = new DataItem[] {} ;
        var groups = ItemList
            .GroupBy(item => item.time.Hour * 60 + (item.time.Minute/15)*15 );
        var sums   = groups
            .ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.Sum(item => item.number));


        // lookups now become trivially easy:

        int slot1900 = sums[1900];
        int slot1915 = sums[1915];
        int slot1930 = sums[1930];
    }
}
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Mmm. updated answer after spotting that you wanted to group each 15 minutes together ... Sorry for the sloppy reading –  sehe Sep 15 '11 at 16:40

What is the result of this algorithm? Apologies if I'm being daft for not getting it.

It seems to indentify all items in itemList whose minute value is evenly divisible by 15, then add its number value into a running counter, and then add that running counter into this Aggregates object.

Because I'm not clear on the types of some of these objects, I'm a little fuzzy on what's actually happening here. You seem to aggregate once with "aggregateData += item.number" and then aggregate AGAIN with "Aggregates.Add(aggregateData)" are you sure you're not double-summing these things? I'm not even clear if you're trying to sum values of qualified items or create a list of them.

That aside, it's definitely not required or optimal to go over the entire list of 1 million items 24*4 times, but I can't be sure what is correct without a clearer understanding of the goal.

As suggested in the other answers, the correct approach is likely to iterate over itemList exactly once and operate on every single item, rather than iterating ~100 times and discarding each item in the list ~99 times (since you know it can only qualify for one of the ~100 iterations).

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var itemByHourAndMinute = ItemList.ToLookup(item => new Tuple.Create(item.Time.Hour, item.Time.Minute)});
var times = Enumerable.Range(0, 24).
                 SelectMany(hour => Enumerable.Range(0, 60).
                       Select(minute => new Tuple.Create(hour, minute)));
var sumByTime = times.
                  Where(hourMinute => itemByHourAndMinute.ContainsKey(hourMinute).
                  Select(hourMinute => new {Time = hourMinute, Sum = itemByHourAndMinute[hourMinute].Sum(item => item.number)}));

What you should get is a collection of pair of time (hour + minute) and sum of item numbers for that time. The lookup guarantees the performance of the hour/minute items retrieval is good.

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Your problem statement is a wee bit fuzzy. It looks like you want a summary, by item id, giving you the sum of all item numbers where the timestamp falls on a integral quarter-hour boundary.

The following should do the trick, I think.

  • one pass through the list
  • the datastore is a SortedDictionary (a height balanced binary tree), so lookup, insertion and removal is O(log N).

Here's the code:

public class SummaryData
{
  public SummaryData( int id )
  {
    this.SummaryId   = id ;
    this.TotalNumber = 0  ;
  }
  public int SummaryId   { get; set; }
  public int TotalNumber { get; set; }
}

public class ListItem
{
  public int      Id     ;
  public int      Number ;
  public DateTime Time   ;
}

public IEnumerable<SummaryData> Summarize( IEnumerable<ListItem> ItemList )
{
  const long                        TICKS_PER_QUARTER_HOUR = TimeSpan.TicksPerMinute * 15;
  SortedDictionary<int,SummaryData> summary                = new SortedDictionary<int , SummaryData>();

  foreach ( ListItem item in ItemList )
  {
    long TimeOfDayTicks     = item.Time.TimeOfDay.Ticks;
    bool on15MinuteBoundary = ( 0 == TimeOfDayTicks % TICKS_PER_QUARTER_HOUR ? true : false );

    if ( on15MinuteBoundary )
    {
      int         key      = (int)( TimeOfDayTicks / TICKS_PER_QUARTER_HOUR );
      SummaryData value;
      bool        hasValue = summary.TryGetValue( key , out value );

      if ( !hasValue )
      {
        value = new SummaryData( item.Id );
        summary.Add( value.SummaryId , value ) ;
      }
      value.TotalNumber += item.Number;

    }

  }

  return summary.Values;

}
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