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I have a lot of inputs with the same name attribute. I know how to get them all as jQuery object!

The console.log() prints-out something like this:

[
<input type=​"checkbox" name=​"people" value=​"33" checked=​"checked">​
, 
<input type=​"checkbox" name=​"people" value=​"1" checked=​"checked">​
]

After that, I need to send an AJAX request to server that contains all IDs of people (value attribute).

Obviously, I can chain serialize() to that jQuery object and the result will be like:

people=33&people=1

...but I'm looking for 'more-friendly' way. 'More-friendly' to PHP, so I can do like:

foreach ($_POST['people'] as $people) {

    echo $people;

}

Any ideas? Maybe I'm just too tired to see the easy answer here by myself. :)

Thanks in advice!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

.serializeArray() might do the trick: http://api.jquery.com/serializeArray/

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This works, but, sadly, I don't need the name attribute, because it repeats. Nevermind, it does work fine! :) –  daGrevis Sep 15 '11 at 16:36
    
Okay, it doesn't work. It works almost! :D The problem is, when passing serialized data (using serializeArray()) as 2nd param of post() method... it sends only one element of array. It does ignore other elements, because name attributes are the same. –  daGrevis Sep 15 '11 at 16:40
    
You are going to need to add the [] to the field names that repeat then. You can add them in your markup as @jondavidjohn suggested, or programmatically by looping through the results of your serialize array call. –  bstakes Sep 15 '11 at 16:55
    
You shouldn't mark something answered if it didn't answer it. –  Jason McCreary Sep 15 '11 at 18:03
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PHP requires multiple checkboxes of the same name to use bracket notation. Using the following naming convention should allow you to do what you want.

<input type=​"checkbox" name=​"people[]" value=​"1" checked=​"checked">​
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Assuming you're not working with a radio group... –  jondavidjohn Sep 15 '11 at 16:33
    
As I said in my question, I'm using AJAX to send those values to server. Not <input type="submit" />. –  daGrevis Sep 15 '11 at 16:35
    
@deGrevis, serialize() should still work. –  Jason McCreary Sep 15 '11 at 18:02
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just add [] to your names for your checkbox names...

<input type=​"checkbox" name=​"people[]" value=​"33" checked=​"checked">​
<input type=​"checkbox" name=​"people[]" value=​"1" checked=​"checked">​

Then $_POST['people'] will be an array of the input's values...

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Okay, I will answer my question. :)

Loop over jQuery object (where <input>s are) and add value of the element to an array.

var data = [];

$(this).parents('form').find('input[name="people"]').each(function() {

    data.push($(this).val());

});

console.log(data);

$.post('over/the/rainbow', {'people' : data});

Edit:

In my opinion, @bstakes way is cleaner.

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Just thought I'd answer this question with the cleanest alternative I've found. I was looking to solve this EXACT problem but the methods listed here just weren't working great for me... so I decided to see if there was anything I could do to the url encoded string that jQuery's serialize() produced on the server side, and I came up with this:

Form:
<form id="people-form">
<input type="text" name="people[]" value="john">
<input type="text" name="people[]" value="bill">


<input type="text" name="places[]" value="california">
<input type="text" name="places[]" value="michigan">
</form>

jQuery:
$.post('myscript.php', { people_form : $("#people-form).serialize()});

Then PHP (contents of myscript.php):
<?php
//parses the url-encoded string & creates the '$people_form' array for values
//the 2nd parameter '$people_form' is an array custom-named by you
parse_str($_POST['people_form'], $people_form);

//you can now index the values
//$people_form['people'][0] = "john"
//$people_form['people'][1] = "bill"
//$people_form['places'][0] = "california"
//$people_form['places'][1] = "michigan"
?>

This is the cleanest way I've figured out that maintained all the index-value associations

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