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I have a JS function where a value is computed and this value should be returned but I get everytime undefined but if I console.log() the result within this function it works. Could you help?

function detect(URL) {
    var image = new Image();
    image.src = URL;
    image.onload = function() {
        var result = [{ x: 45, y: 56 }]; // An example result
        return result; // Doesn't work
    }
}

alert(detect('image.png'));
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Note: you also should set the .onload handler before you set .src because onload can trigger immediately when you set .src if the image is in the browser cache. If you set .onload afterwards, it may miss the load event and never fire. –  jfriend00 Sep 15 '11 at 16:57

5 Answers 5

The value is returned, but not from the detect function.

If you use a named function for the load event handler instead of an anonymous function, it's clearer what's happening:

function handleLoad() {
  var result = [{ x: 45, y: 56 }];
  return result;
}

function detect(URL) {
  var image = new Image();
  image.src = URL;
  image.onload = handleLoad;
}

The value is returned from the handleLoad function to the code that calls the event handler, but the detect function has already exited before that. There isn't even any return statement in the detect function at all, so you can't expect the result to be anything but undefined.

One common way of handling asynchronous scenarios like this, is to use a callback function:

function detect(URL, callback) {
  var image = new Image();
  image.src = URL;
  image.onload = function() {
    var result = [{ x: 45, y: 56 }];
    callback(result);
  };
}

You call the detect function with a callback, which will be called once the value is available:

detect('image.png', function(result){
  alert(result);
});
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detect() doesn't return any value. If you want to get an alert, replace return result; by alert(result).

An analysis of your code:

function detect(URL) {
    ...
    image.onload = function(){ //assigning an event handler (function) to an object
        ...
        return result; //this return statement is called from within another function
    }
}//function "detect" ends here. No return statement has been encountered
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I don't want to alert anything, that was just for testing :) –  Poru Sep 15 '11 at 16:41

This is because the function detect doesn't return anything since the load event happens after the function is finished. And you forgot to append the image to something so it never loads.

You could do something like:

function detect(URL) {
    var image = new Image();
    image.src = URL;
    image.onload = function() {
        var result = 'result'; // An example result
        alert(result); // Doesn't work
    }
    document.body.appendChild(image)
}

detect('http://www.roseindia.net/javascript/appendChild-1.gif');

fiddle here http://jsfiddle.net/LVRuQ/

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Your function detect doesn't return anything, which is why the alert is showing "undefined". The return statement that you claim doesn't work is returning from the anonymous function you assign to image.onload, and probably works fine if you would call that function.

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Yes, but if he doesn't add the image to the DOM the image never loads and the event is never fired –  Nicola Peluchetti Sep 15 '11 at 16:45
    
@NicolaPeluchetti: True, but that's not the question here, and onload probably ignores the return value anyway. If he would somehow call that function manually, the return would work. –  Anomie Sep 15 '11 at 16:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I get it myself:

I didn't know that I can assign a variable to that (for me looking already assigned) onload.

function detect(URL) {
    var image = new Image();
    image.src = URL;
    var x = image.onload = function() {
        var result = [{ x: 45, y: 56 }]; // An example result
        return result;
    }();
    return x;
}

alert(detect('x'));
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1  
This does not make much sense. You execute the function, then set the result to image.onload. So image.onload will be an array, whilst it should be a function. Then you also set that array to x and return it. You do get the array back from detect(...), but the whole idea of onload is lost. –  pimvdb Sep 15 '11 at 17:10

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