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Say I have the following:

public abstract class ControlLimitBase : IDisposable 
{
}

public abstract class UpperAlarmLimit : ControlLimitBase 
{
}

public class CdsUpperAlarmLimit : UpperAlarmLimit 
{
}

Two Questions:

1. I'm a little confused on when my IDisposable members would actually get called. Would they get called when an instance of CdsUpperAlarmLimit goes out of scope?

2. How would I handle disposing of objects created in the CdsUpperAlarmLimit class? Should this also derive from IDisposable?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Dispose() is never called automatically - it depends on how the code is actually used.

1.) Dispose() is called when you specifically call Dispose():

myAlarm.Dispose();

2.) Dispose() is called at the end of a using block using an instance of your type.

using(var myAlarm = new CdsUpperAlarmLimit())
{

}

The using block is syntactic sugar for a try/finally block with a call to Dispose() on the object "being used" in the finally block.

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Forgive my ignorance here. I've written a class that implements IDisposable, and when I use it in a using block the Dispose() method is never called. Does that mean I still need to call Dispose() inside my using block? –  jp2code Apr 5 '12 at 18:27
    
@jpcode: no you don't have to - the using block is equivalen to a try/finally with a Dispose call in the finally code block –  BrokenGlass Apr 5 '12 at 18:44
  1. No, IDisposable won't be called just automatically. You'd normally call Dispose with a using statement, like this:

    using (ControlLimitBase limit = new UpperAlarmLimit())
    {
        // Code using the limit
    }
    

    This is effectively a try/finally block, so Dispose will be called however you leave the block.

  2. CdsUpperAlarmLimit already implements IDisposable indirectly. If you follow the normal pattern for implementing IDisposable in non-sealed classes, you'll override void Dispose(bool disposing) and dispose your composed resources there.

Note that the garbage collector does not call Dispose itself - although it can call a finalizer. You should rarely use a finalizer unless you have a direct handle on unmanaged resources though.

To be honest, I usually find it's worth trying to change the design to avoid needing to keep hold of unmanaged resources in classes - implementing IDisposable properly in the general case is frankly a pain. It's not so bad if your class is sealed (no need for the extra method; just implement the Dispose() method) - but it still means your clients need to be aware of it, so that they can use an appropriate using statement.

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good answer, as usual... –  oleksii Sep 15 '11 at 16:55

IDisposable has one member, Dispose().

This is called when you choose to call it. Most typically that's done for you by the framework with the using block syntactic sugar.

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I'm a little confused on when my IDisposable members would actually get called. Would they get called when an instance of CdsUpperAlarmLimit goes out of scope?

No. Its get called when you use using construct as:

using(var inst = new CdsUpperAlarmLimit())
{
    //...
}//<-------- here inst.Dispose() gets called.

But it doesn't get called if you write this:

{
   var inst = new CdsUpperAlarmLimit();
   //...
}//<-------- here inst.Dispose() does NOT get called.

However, you can write this as well:

var inst = new CdsUpperAlarmLimit();
using( inst )
{
    //...
}//<-------- here inst.Dispose() gets called.
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The best practice recommend when you implement Dispose() method in non sealed class you should have a virtual method for your derived classes to override.

Read more on Dispose pattern here http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/idisposable.aspx

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when using an IDisposable object, it's always good to use it this way:

using(var disposable = new DisposableObject())
{
    // do you stuff with disposable
}

After the using block has been run, the Dispose method will be called on the IDisposable object. Otherwise you would need to call Dispose manually.

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  1. When someone calls .Dispose on it.
  2. No, it already implements it through inheritance.
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IDisposable is implemented when you want to indicate that your resource has dependencies that must be explicitly unloaded and cleaned up. As such, IDisposable is never called automatically (like with Garbage Collection).

Generally, to handle IDisposables, you should wrap their usage in a using block

using(var x = new CdsUpperAlarmLimit()) { ... }

this compiles to:

CdsUpperAlarmLimit x = null;
try
{
   x = new CdsUpperAlarmLimit();
   ...
}
finally
{
   x.Dispose();
}

So, back to topic, if your type, CdsUpperAlarmLimit, is implementing IDisposable, it's saying to the world: "I have stuff that must be disposed". Common reasons for this would be:

  • CdsUpperAlarmLimit keeps some OTHER IDisposable resources (like FileStreams, ObjectContexts, Timers, etc.) and when CdsUpperAlarmLimit is done being used, it needs to make sure the FileStreams, ObjectContexts, Timers, etc. also get Dispose called.
  • CdsUpperAlarmLimit is using unmanaged resources or memory and must clean up when it's done or there will be a memory leak
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