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I have a map. lets say map<int, vector<int> > mymap1. I want to update mymap1 by deleting some “keys” and also removing unwanted “elements” from the vector part of the selected keys. The “key’ or the “element” going to be deleted is given from another vector, known as “mylabel”. Actually, What I need to remain in my map is the values whose label is equal to 1. (At the end, keys must have the elements whose label are 1 only.)

I have implemented this (see code below), but got some compiler errors.

map<int, vector<int> > mymap1;
map<int, vector<int> >::iterator map1;
for (map1=mymap1.begin();map1!=mymap1.end();map1++){
       int key = map1->first;
       if (mylabel[key].Label() != 1){ mymap1.erase(key);
       }

       else{
            vector<int> &myvec = map1->second;
            for (vector<int>::iterator rn=myvec.begin(); rn!=myvec.end(); rn++){
                 if (mylabel[*rn].Label() != 1) myvec.erase(myvec.begin()+(*rn));
            }                        
       }
}

for you to get an idea, i am showing some example of my map.

0 1 2 6 10
1 0 2 4 3 6
2 0 1 3 5 8
3 1 2 4 5 7
4 1 3 6 7
5 2 3 8 7 9
6 1 0 7 4
7 6 4 3 5 9 11 10 13 12
8 2 5 9 11 18 15 19 20 22
9 5 7 11 8
10 0 7 14 16
11 9 7 8 13
12 7 13 14
13 7 12 11 14 15
14 12 10 16 13 15 17
15 13 14 8 17 19
16 14 10 17 21
17 14 16 15 21 18
18 8 20 19 17 26 27
19 8 15 18
20 8 18
21 16 17 23 24
22 8
23 25 21 24 26
24 23 21
25 23 26
26 23 25 18
27 18 28
28 27

if i show you my mylabel, it is as follows.

for(int c=0;c<mylabel.size();c++){
    cout<<c<<" : "<<"label "<<mylabel[c].Label()<<endl;
}
0 : label 0
1 : label 0
2 : label 0
3 : label 0
4 : label 0
5 : label 1
6 : label 0
7 : label 1
8 : label 0
9 : label 1
10 : label 0
11 : label 1
12 : label 0
13 : label 0
14 : label 1
15 : label 1
16 : label 1
17 : label 1
18 : label 0
19 : label 0
20 : label 0
21 : label 1
22 : label 0
23 : label 0
24 : label 0
25 : label 1
26 : label 1
27 : label 0
28 : label 0

When I am deactivating the else part and running above code I got an output. But, I want to say you that it is a wrong result. I am getting extra keys that should be deleted. I can’t figure out why I got this fault result. if i show the list of keys what i got,

5
7
9
11
14
15
16
17
20 - wrong
21
24 - wrong
25
26

could you please help me to rectify my code in order to get my modified map. thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
You're erasing an item while looping on the list. The iterator is probably losing its right order. –  Yochai Timmer Sep 15 '11 at 17:34
    
any rectification for my code plzz. –  niro Sep 15 '11 at 17:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your erasing logic is wrong, and you end up using invalid iterators. (You're literally pulling the rug out from under your feet if you erase an iterator and then keep using that iterator.)

For node-based containers (list, map, set, unordered), you typically erase as follows:

for (auto it = c.begin(); it != c.end(); )
{
  if (must_delete(*it))  // or it->first
  {
    c.erase(it++); // advance first, then erase previous
  }
  else
  {
    ++it;
  }
}

(This patterns is my favourite justification for the post-fix increment operator.)

For contiguous containers (vector, deque), erasing one element at a time is inefficient, because it incurs repeated moves. The preferred idiom here is "remove/erase", but it requires that you supply a suitable predicate if you don't just want to remove straight by element value. Here's an example with lambdas, for brevity:

std::vector<int> v;
v.erase(std::remove_if(v.begin(), v.end(),
                       [](int n)->bool{return some_criterion(n);}),
        v.end());

In your situation, you could write the lambda as [mylabel&](n)->bool{ return mylabel[n].Label() != 1; }; or write a traditional predicate object if you don't have lambdas:

struct LabelFinder
{
  LabelFinder(const LabelVector & lv) : label(lv) { }

  inline bool operator()(int n) const
  {
    return label[n].Label() != 1;
  }

private:
  const LabelVector & label;
};

Now use:

v.erase(std::remove_if(v.begin(), v.end(), LabelFinder(mylabel)), v.end());
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for giving me solutions. now i am able to delete unwanted keys of my map. but, i cant solve vector element deletion. when i am using idiomatic way as you given, i got the following errors. –DetectR.cpp expected primary-expression before '[' token DetectR.cpp expected primary-expression before ']' token DetectR.cpp expected unqualified-id before "bool" . i want to say, i am using DevC++. also, my compiler didnt recognise your given "auto". so i used normal way. –  niro Sep 16 '11 at 12:51
    
@g_niro: You probably don't have support for lambdas. You can write the lambda as a completely equivalent predicate. Do you need help with that? –  Kerrek SB Sep 16 '11 at 13:06
    
yes please, i need your help for that. please ... –  niro Sep 16 '11 at 13:21
    
@g_niro: Added. I don't actually know the type of your mylabel container, so you have to fill that in for LabelVector. Just add the class definition somewhere above your code. –  Kerrek SB Sep 16 '11 at 13:25
    
thanks. i will try to follow your way. actually, mylabel is a vector of another class objects. if i say that, base class = Feature, contains some attributes of polygons. derived class = Features. so, Features = vector<Feature> is equal to mylabel object. so, i want to know whether this struct code should be written inside my program .cpp itself or inside the class where Features (or mylabel) is defined? me, i am using somebody else customised library. so i am confusing. make clear please. –  niro Sep 16 '11 at 13:57

The problem is in the for loop. std::vector<T>::erase() returns iterator to the new position followed by the erased item. So the loop should be written as:

for (vector<int>::iterator rn=myvec.begin(); rn!=myvec.end();)
{
       if (mylabel[*rn].Label() != 1) 
             rn = myvec.erase(rn);
       else
             ++rn;
}   

Read the doc:

By the way, I doubt on this:

 rn = myvec.erase(myvec.begin()+(*rn));
            Vs
 rn = myvec.erase(rn);

Are you sure you want the first one?


An idiomatic way to erase elements which are not equal to one is this:

 //Define this function
 bool isNotOne(int n) {  return n != 1; }

//then do this instead of writing manual loop
 myvec.erase( remove_if(myvec.begin(), myvec.end(), isNotOne), myvec.end() ); 

It's called :

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm... this is a very poor way to erase from a vector. –  Kerrek SB Sep 15 '11 at 17:42
    
@Kerrek: Agree; there are idiomatic way to erase items from a vector. But I don't exactly know what he wants to remove, and how he makes that decision. –  Nawaz Sep 15 '11 at 17:45
    
@Nawaz: i am not sure what it would be, but, i want to remove all the elments whose label is not equal to 1. –  niro Sep 15 '11 at 17:46
    
@g_niro: In that case, rn = myvec.erase(rn); is correct. –  Nawaz Sep 15 '11 at 17:47
    
He has the exact same problem erasing from the map. You should add that to your answer. –  Mooing Duck Sep 15 '11 at 17:48

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