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I have been working on a program that will do a bubble sort for n integers. I have hit a wall, as I do not know to refresh the array once my assembler operation are done. Any suggestions would be great.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int n;
int *input;
int output;
int i;

int main(void)
{
scanf("%d", &n);

input = (int *)malloc(sizeof(n));

for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    scanf("%d", &input[i]);
}

__asm
{
    mov ebx, input
    mov esi, n


outer_loop:
    dec esi
    jz end_outer
    mov edi, n

inner_loop:
    dec edi
    jz outer_loop

compare:
    mov al, [ebx + edi - 1]
    mov dl, [ebx + edi]
    cmp al, dl
    jnl inner_loop

swap:
    mov [ebx + edi], al
    mov [ ebx + edi - 1], dl
    jmp inner_loop

end_outer:



}

for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    printf("%d\n", input[i]);
}
scanf("%d", &output);
}
share|improve this question
6  
Define "refresh" in this context. What can't you do? –  dmckee Sep 15 '11 at 17:38
3  
There's something deeply disturbing about implementing an algorithm as slow as bubble sort in a language as fast as assembly :) –  Tom Zych Sep 15 '11 at 17:40
    
Sorry, I meant that it simply reprints the original array. I can't get it to print the resorted one. –  Ryan Sep 15 '11 at 17:40
2  
Careful with the "wasting his time comments". He's wasting his time if the idea is to have a fast sort, but not if the point is to learn how to work the assembly embedding feature of his compiler... –  dmckee Sep 15 '11 at 17:47
1  
dmckee, Griogio - You guys are right, I shouldn't have written with such a discouraging tone. Ryan, don't feel dissuaded by my hyperbole/cynicism. :-) –  asveikau Sep 15 '11 at 18:00

3 Answers 3

There's nothing to "refresh". Your code runs. ebx contains input and that's that. (Hint: Your C code also gets transformed into assembly. Looking at what your compiler generates through a disassembler might give you some insight.)

That said I see some problems:

input = (int *)malloc(sizeof(n));

This allocation is not big enough and your program will crash. You want to allocate sizeof(int) * n. You should also check the allocation for errors.

mov al, [ebx + edi - 1]
mov dl, [ebx + edi]
cmp al, dl

Kind of verbose. You should be able to do register-to-memory comparisons. (eg. cmp al, byte [ebx + edi])

Not to mention it's a complete waste of time to implement bubble sort in assembly. Rephrase: Learning assembly is great, but it would be a bad idea to use this in anything that matters. One of the most important things about knowing assembly is knowing when you don't need to use it. You'd probably find very often that what your compiler generates is good enough. Let's also not forget that a good algorithm in C will beat a bad algorithm in assembly, such as bubble sort.

@Giorgio also raises a good point in the comments. Your assembly is comparing and sorting bytes. You want to be doing things like this:

mov eax, [ebx + edi - 4]    ; assumes edi is a byte offset, see next comment
mov edx, [ebx + edi]

And instead of dec edi etc., you want to do:

sub edi, 4

Your swap would also have to be re-done to use 32-bit quantities.

This is of course assuming int is 32 bits, which may not be the case. If you're using (non-standard) inline assembly it's probably fair that you're doing this - it means you're already targeting a particular compiler. (Based on the syntax I'd say VC++) Nitpickers might say you should use int32_t instead of int.

Note I'm not sure if this is the only problem, I haven't looked at your code too thoroughly.

share|improve this answer
    
Aren't al and dl too small to hold an int? Shouldn't edi and (edi - 1) be multiplied by sizeof(int)? –  Giorgio Sep 15 '11 at 17:46
    
@Giorgio - This is a good point. I will update the answer. –  asveikau Sep 15 '11 at 17:48
    
I am curious to see the solution. I guess you have to store sizeof(int) in a C variable and then read that from assembly. –  Giorgio Sep 15 '11 at 17:50
    
You guys are right to flame me for the "waste of time" comment, so I've rephrased it. –  asveikau Sep 15 '11 at 17:57
    
@Giorgio - I think if he's bothering to use __asm he's already making assumptions about the sizes of int, etc. It would be very strange to write runtime code to detect the size of integers, rather than just assuming that these are the size of a general purpose register. Maybe rather than int it should be int32_t. –  asveikau Sep 15 '11 at 18:04

I will also give it a try.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int n;
int *input;
int output;
int i;
int s;

int main(void)
{
    s = sizeof(int);
    scanf("%d", &n);

    input = (int *)malloc(sizeof(n));

    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        scanf("%d", &input[i]);
    }

    __asm
    {
        mov ecx, s
        mov ebx, input
        mov esi, n
        mul esi, ecx

    outer_loop:
        sub esi, ecx
        jz end_outer
        mov edi, esi

    inner_loop:
        sub edi, ecx
        jz outer_loop

    compare:
        mov edx, [ebx + edi]
        sub edi, ecx
        mov eax, [ebx + edi]
        add edi, ecx

        cmp eax, edx
    jnl inner_loop

    swap:
        mov [ebx + edi], eax
        sub edi, ecx
        mov [ebx + edi], edx
        add edi, ecx
        jmp inner_loop

    end_outer:
    }

    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        printf("%d\n", input[i]);
    }

    scanf("%d", &output);
}

I used variable s to hold the size of an integer. To my knowledge it is not allowed to use an indirection like

mov eax, [ebx + edi + ecx]

therefore I had to add separate add and sub. It is not very nice, does anyone see a better solution?

share|improve this answer

You seem to intend to allocate and input an array of n int values. (Although the memory size in your malloc is incorrect, as has already been noted).

But then you proceed to sort your array as an array of n bytes. Why are you sorting bytes instead of sorting ints?

Even if your sorting algorithm is implemented correctly (as byte-sorting implementation), the end result will look totally meaningless, since you are printing your array as an array of ints in the end.

First make up your mind what is that you are trying to work with: ints or bytes (chars) and then act accordingly and consistently.

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