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I generate KML files which may have 50,000 placemarks or more, arranged in Folders based on a domain-specific grouping. The KML file uses custom images which are packed in to a KMZ file.

I'm looking to breakup the single KML file in to multiple files, partitioned based on the grouping, so rather than having 1 large document with folders, i'd have a root/index KML file with folders linking to the smaller KML files.

Is this possible though? I think that a KMZ file can contain only 1 KML file, regardless of where it's located or its name, in the zip. Furthermore, I'm not exactly sure how a KML file can link to another KML file. Is the only way to have it as a <NetworkLink> to a local file? Can a <NetworkLink> work to link to a file local in the same KMZ?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes you can use a networklink to accomplish this and as far as I know it's the only way to do what you ask. And yes you can reference local files in Network links

See: http://code.google.com/intl/nl-NL/apis/kml/documentation/kml_tut.html (search for "Network Links") where it says:

A network link contains a element with an (a hypertext reference) that loads a file. The can be a local file specification or an absolute URL. Despite the name, a <NetworkLink> does not necessarily load files from the network. The <href> in a link specifies the location of any of the following:

• An image file used by icons in icon styles, ground overlays, and screen overlays
• A model file used in the element
• A KML or KMZ file loaded by a Network Link

No you can't reference to another file inside a kmz. A kmz can only contain 1 kml file (it can contain other type of files though) You can find the layout of kmz files and what may be put in them here Specifically note the following section:

2.Put the default KML file (doc.kml, or whatever name you want to give it) at the top level within this folder. Include only one .kml file. (When Google Earth opens a KMZ file, it scans the file, looking for the first .kml file in this list. It ignores all subsequent .kml files, if any, in the archive. If the archive contains multiple .kml files, you cannot be sure which one will be found first, so you need to include only one.)

One final remark is that your question doesn't tell anything if you need these 50.000 placemarks as offline files or not. If you could serve them dynamically you could use the region based links where GE will tell you the viewing region of the client so you can return a small subset of the waypoints (only the ones that are inside the users view) For more info this is the link to click on.

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Thanks Eddy. The intent is to have everything offline – Stealth Rabbi Sep 22 '11 at 17:55
1  
The statement above "A kmz can only contain 1 kml file" is incorrect. Problem is that this is not clearly documented any where. – JasonM1 Oct 16 '12 at 18:58

By design you can have multiple KML files within a single KMZ file. That way you can bundle many KML files in a single KMZ file that is downloaded, sent via e-mail or accessed offline.

Google Earth can scale to a large number of features (50,000 or much larger) in a single KMZ file if the features are split into multiple KML files and the KML is defined such that all the sub-KML files are not displayed at once. KML provides mechanisms to control which features or sub-KML files are displayed using time, region, or altitude level filtering.

Large KML files can scale using any of the following techniques:

  1. NetworkLinks
  2. Regions
  3. Folder Radio style or explicit visiblity=0

NetworkLinks

You can have any level of NetworkLinks from within your root KML file from flat (single KML file with many Networklinks to all other KML files within the KMZ) to deep (with each KML file with a NetworkLink to KML files each with its own NetworkLinks). Depends on how you need to structure your KML and how large the data is.

The key is that Google Earth chooses the first KML as the root KML file so you must ensure that the first file (typically named doc.kml) is the root KML file that loads the other KML files via network links. A common structure is to include additional KML files in a "kml" sub-folder to differentiate it from the root KML file.

Here's a KMZ example with 4 file entries: root KML file (doc.kml) that contains a NetworkLink to "kml/sub1.kml" and another to "kml/sub2.kml", which in turn has a NetworkLink to "sub3.kml" also in "kml" sub-folder.

== test.kmz ==

+doc.kml
   NetworkLink > kml/sub1.kml
   NetworkLink > kml/sub2.kml
+kml/sub1.kml
+kml/sub2.kml
   NetworkLink > sub3.kml
+kml/sub3.kml

Here is the structure of such a doc.kml file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<kml xmlns="http://www.opengis.net/kml/2.2">
  <Document>
    <NetworkLink>
        <name>NetworkLinked sub-item</name>
        <Link>
          <href> kml/sub1.kml </href>
        </Link>
    </NetworkLink>
    <NetworkLink>
        <name>NetworkLinked sub-item</name>
        <Link>
          <href> kml/sub2.kml </href>
        </Link>
    </NetworkLink>
    ...
  </Document>
</kml>

As a best practice if you include more than one NetworkLink with time-based features in a parent KML file then add a <TimeSpan> element to the NetworkLinks including the full range of time for that collection of features otherwise Google Earth will automatically load the entire file at startup.

<NetworkLink>
  <TimeSpan>
    <begin>2007-01-14T01:00:00Z</begin>
    <end>2007-01-14T02:00:00Z</end>
  </TimeSpan>
  <Link>
    <href>...</href>
  </Link>
</NetworkLink>

Regions

A Region affects visibility of a Placemark's geometry or an Overlay's image. Regions combined with NeworkLinks are a powerful tool.

For more details, here's a tutorial on Regions in KML
https://developers.google.com/kml/documentation/regions

Radio Folders

You can further restrict what is displayed at a given time using radio folders.

Here's a radio folder example allowing the user to only choose one of the NetworkLinks at a time. This is used when the content is mutually exclusive and only one set of features should appear at any given time.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<kml xmlns="http://www.opengis.net/kml/2.2">
    <Document>
        <Style id="rf">
            <ListStyle>
                <listItemType>radioFolder</listItemType>
            </ListStyle>
        </Style>

        <Folder>        
            <name>One at a time example</name>
            <open>1</open>
            <description>Link 1 visible by default</description>
            <styleUrl>#rf</styleUrl>

            <NetworkLink>
                <name>NetworkLinked sub-item-1</name>
                <Link>
                    <href> kml/sub1.kml </href>
                </Link>
            </NetworkLink>

            <NetworkLink>
                <name>NetworkLinked sub-item-2</name>
                <visibility>0</visibility>
                <Link>
                    <href> kml/sub2.kml </href>
                </Link>
            </NetworkLink>

        </Folder>
    </Document>
</kml>
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