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I'm a very experienced developer - done a lot of heavy duty work with Delphi, C# and C++ for years. I have always adhered very closely to the guidelines for structured programming, OOP, loosely coupled modular designs etc - and since all the languages I've used have built-in ways of enforcing these concepts - access control, static types, interface and abstract class support etc - I rely on these to structure my code.

Now, I have been doodling with Python for a few months. I am impressed by its many wonderful features - but I sorely miss the built-in constraints that make it easy to keep code modularized and organized. And, unfortunately, I see an awful lot of 'spaghetti code' out there written in Python, even from very respectable sources. I won't single anyone out but I have a few books written by major league pythonistas with examples replete with designs (better put - 'anti-designs') that make me shudder. It seems to me that because Python is so easy to use, it's also very easy to abuse.

I do try to discipline myself when I code in Python, but I find it takes a lot of extra work to implement and often I have to set up and adhere to constraints simply based on my own memory of the design with no help from the language at all. And since there is no 'compile time' checking, it's doubly difficult - often you don't discover a design flaw until you actually RUN that segment of code.

So, I'm looking for very specific information: some examples or better still a book of WELL STRUCTURED Python designs and design techniques - how to best implement encapsulation, indirection, very loosely coupled designs, etc.

Bad design IMO from a prominent python book author - (with obfuscation)

def populateList(self, selecteddisk=None):
selected = None ***#Bundling - coupling:*** 
self.listWidget.clear()
for disk in self.disks.inOrder():
item = QListWidgetItem(QString("%1 of %2/%3 (%L4)") \
.arg(disk.name).arg(disk.owner).arg(disk.country) \
.arg(disk.teu))
self.listWidget.addItem(item)
***#Bundling - coupling:*** 
if selecteddisk is not None and selecteddisk == id(disk):
    selected = item
    if selected is not None:
    selected.setSelected(True)
    self.listWidget.setCurrentItem(selected)
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7  
It'd be helpful to see examples of what you consider 'anti-designs'. –  Cat Plus Plus Sep 15 '11 at 18:17
4  
Generally speaking, I find access control silly, and interfaces/abstract classes wholly unnecessary (code is more generic when you program against concepts/operations, not concrete interfaces — and that's true for C++ as well, in which templates are a form of compile-time duck typing). That said, both interfaces and ABCs can be implemented in Python — see e.g. zope.interface, or stdlib abc module. –  Cat Plus Plus Sep 15 '11 at 18:22
2  
Maybe extensive use of unit tests could help you -- they are more important in Python than in statically typed languages. –  Sven Marnach Sep 15 '11 at 18:28
    
Python is flexible and adaptive. You're not going to find the kinds of constraints you're used to from other languages in it. That's one of its advantages. –  g.d.d.c Sep 15 '11 at 18:35
    
I think most python users view design patters as something that emerges from code, not something that is injected into it. –  Wilduck Sep 15 '11 at 18:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I find it takes a lot of extra work to implement and compile code that adheres to constraints simply based on my own memory of the design with no help from the language when writing the code itself before compiling. Some IDE's offer help, but the language itself offers me no help at all.

And since 'compile time' checking never seems to help me find ordinary logic bugs it's doubly difficult - often you don't discover a design flaw until you actually RUN that segment of code.

Python designs and design techniques ... how to best implement encapsulation,

By encapsulating. In languages like Java and C++, "encapsulation" has grown to mean "uses private stuff all over the place." In Python that's simply not supported.

We're All Adults Here.

You still do encapsulation just like you did in every other language. Without the word private, however.

Python offers properties, decorators and overrides to __getattribute__ to implement various kinds of encapsulation techniques.

indirection,

By referencing other objects. I'm not clear on what specific problems you have here, but perhaps you've passed some wrong-type argument to a function. The way to avoid this is to read the docstrings you wrote for yourself.

very loosely coupled designs, etc.

By doing dependency injection. Again. Python works just like every other language with respect to loose coupling.

You should investigate -- and use -- docstrings heavily.

You might want to use http://sphinx.pocoo.org to generate nice documentation from your docstrings.

You can also use Python's built-in help() function to read the docstrings you wrote when you wrote your code.

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"We're All Adults Here" - sounds great. Unfortunately, many 'adults' seem to act like children... –  Vector Sep 15 '11 at 18:45
    
@Mikey: What does that mean? They read the documentation and break the rules? They have the source, you know, and can modify that, too? What are you claiming? –  S.Lott Sep 15 '11 at 18:45
    
"uses private stuff all over the place." No. It means making public via interfaces what consumers of your code (even you yourself) need and 'hiding' what they don't. Why? It makes code robust-easy to modify and adapt. –  Vector Sep 15 '11 at 19:01
1  
A good interface never has to change, even though implementation details can/will change. Encapsulation means you can localize your changes and do big mods to your implementation without breaking the rest of your code. This may not seem important when you have a script with 3 files that only you control. But in large, complex applications maintained by a team this is HUGE. Ever try modifiying speghetti code that's 5 years old and all the original developers are gone? Ever deliver a big app and then learn that the customer wants to migrate to a new database system or OS? –  Vector Sep 15 '11 at 19:01
    
@Mikey: "It means making public via interfaces what consumers of your code (even you yourself) need and 'hiding' what they don't" It can't mean that, since those are language-specific techniques. Good design has to transcend some Java and C++ technologies that aren't really universal. private makes subclassing almost impossible. Not easy-to-modify at all. –  S.Lott Sep 15 '11 at 19:03

On design pattern support:

There is a proposition that also puts that Design Patterns as a crude metric of gaps in a programming language. It would be an interesting read and counterpoint to your suggestion that design patterns are constraints supported by language.

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I don't claim that 'design patterns are constraints supported by language' - that's a pretty silly notion IMO. I just mean that some languages empower you with tools that make enforcing design patterns easier. –  Vector Sep 15 '11 at 18:47
    
@Mikey: "enforcing design patterns"? What does that mean? Can you provide an example? –  S.Lott Sep 15 '11 at 19:01
    
"design patterns" - nebulous term. I just mean interface/implementation; Abstract/concrete; public: data GetData(join(doStuff; doMoreStuff, doStillMoreStuff))/ private: somedata doStuff();someMoreData doMoreStuff();stillMoreData doStillMoreStuff()... –  Vector Sep 15 '11 at 21:46

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