Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there an implementation of java.util.Map that only allows a value to be read once? What I'd like to do is something like this:

Map map = new ReadOnceMap();
map.put("key", "value")
System.out.println(map.get("key")); // prints "value"
System.out.println(map.get("key")); // prints null

EDIT: requirements:

  • existing implementation
  • values are guaranteed to be read at most one time
share|improve this question
3  
Extend HashMap and after it is read, just remove it. –  James Black Sep 15 '11 at 18:24
    
This is an odd question. But why not just remove the item from the map once it's been queried? –  mrkhrts Sep 15 '11 at 18:25
    
If there is an implementation of this behavior out there, I generally prefer to use that (e.g. in apache commons lang or google guava). –  three-cups Sep 15 '11 at 18:27
    
@James Black, extending HashMap is not always as easy as you think, unless you know the implementation. See "Effective Java" by Bloch (item 14 in my version). –  three-cups Sep 15 '11 at 18:29
    
@three_cups_of_java - My thought is to just extend and then override the get function, while still calling it, but, in actuality I wouldn't worry about having a ReadOnceMap, I delete the key when I read it. –  James Black Sep 16 '11 at 14:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this?

public class GetOnceHashMap<K,V> extends HashMap<K,V> {
    @Override
    public V get(Object key) {
        return remove(key);
    }

    @Override
    public Collection<V> values() {
        Collection<V> v = new ArrayList<V>(super.values());
        clear();
        return v;
    }

    @Override
    public Set<Map.Entry<K, V>> entrySet() {
        Set<Map.Entry<K, V>> e = new HashSet<Map.Entry<K,V>>(super.entrySet());
        clear();
        return e;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is along the right lines, but what about Map.values()? In the end, I'm looking for an implementation that I don't have to write or test. –  three-cups Sep 15 '11 at 18:36
    
You are right. Maybe you need to specify more. How about Map.containsValue(), Map.entrySet()? Is that a read? Should the value be remove after that? –  user802421 Sep 15 '11 at 18:42
    
Yes, I could have been more specific. But I'm looking for an existing library. I think I'll have to write this myself since I can't find it on google. –  three-cups Sep 15 '11 at 18:49
    
I'm going to make this as the correct answer since I based my implementation off of it. Not sure about this, since it does not actually answer my questions. –  three-cups Sep 15 '11 at 18:52
    
If you found one please post the link too. I'm also interested. –  user802421 Sep 15 '11 at 18:53

map.remove() should give you the behaviour you want

Map map = new ReadOnceMap();
map.put("key", "value")
System.out.println(map.remove("key")); // prints "value"
System.out.println(map.remove("key")); // prints null
share|improve this answer
    
This would work, but I'd like to guarantee that values are only read once. This could easily be subverted use map.get. –  three-cups Sep 15 '11 at 18:35

Here's an implementation I came up with.

NOTE: This is not really production-quality because I'm counting on new ArrayList and new HashSet to eagerly (not lazily) read the values. To make this production quality, I would get rid of inheritance and use a dynamic proxy or object composition.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;

public class ReadOnceMap<K, V> extends HashMap<K, V> {

    @Override
    public V get(Object key) {
        return remove(key);
    }

    @Override
    public Set<Map.Entry<K, V>> entrySet() {
        Set<Map.Entry<K, V>> entrySet = new HashSet<Map.Entry<K, V>>(super.entrySet());
        clear();
        return entrySet;
    }

    @Override
    public Collection<V> values() {
        Collection<V> values = new ArrayList<V>(super.values());
        clear();
        return values;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Beware of super.values() and super.entrySet(). It's only create a "view" to the underlying data. After clear() you won't have anything anymore. –  user802421 Sep 15 '11 at 18:55
1  
Thanks! That's what I get for not testing code first. This is why object inheritance can be so difficult. I'll update my code shortly. –  three-cups Sep 15 '11 at 19:03
    
Now I see what you mean. ;) –  user802421 Sep 15 '11 at 19:04
    
I updated my code to create defensive copies for entrySet and values. Note: the defensive copies suffer from the original problem, but I think the implementation of ArrayList and HashSet work this the above implementation. –  three-cups Sep 15 '11 at 19:12

Just call the remove() method instead of the get() method. The remove() method returns the object being removed from the map. So, the first time you'll get your object and after that it will return null.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.