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It might sound stupid, but I was just wondering how can I parse a string to an integer in C++?

This is for a school project, and the explanation sheet says : "Only the use of iostream and string classes and system() function is permitted; The use of any other class or function is prohibited."

I have searched around a bit, but the only suggestions I found are using classes like atoi or atof.

The input string is already checked for error before the parsing, so it will always only contain an integer.

I wouldn't mind doing the parsing manually with conditionals, but I don't think it would be my teacher's (or anyone's) preferred way.

Thanks a bunch if you can help.

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Are you allowed to use Boost? –  Alok Save Sep 15 '11 at 18:35
    
I don't suppose you are allowed to use stringstream? –  nobsid Sep 15 '11 at 18:38
1  
No, the explanation sheet clearly says "Only the use of iostream and string classes and system() function is permitted; The use of any other class or function is prohibited." –  AgentRev Sep 15 '11 at 18:39
    
Well, atoi and atof are functions (not classes). And they are not .NET specific (ANSI C in fact). Ask your teacher about it, but I don't think it is really a big deal to use it –  Anthony Accioly Sep 15 '11 at 18:39
3  
stringstreams are iostream classes. See cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/stringstream. –  robert Sep 15 '11 at 18:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int stringToInt(const std::string &text)
{
    int number = 0;

    int powerIndex = 1;

    for (int i = text.length() - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        number += powerIndex * (text.at(i) - '0');

        powerIndex *= 10;
    }

    return number;
}

std::string intToString (int number)
{
    std::string text = "";

    int numberHolder = number;

    while (numberHolder)
    {
        char digit = (numberHolder % 10) + '0';

        text = digit + text;

        numberHolder /= 10;
    }

    return text;

}
int main ()
{
    //Testing...

    int number = stringToInt("123");

    std::string text = intToString(456);

    std::cout << number << "\n" << text << "\n";

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Usually, primitive types like int (and char, short, long, float, double, ...) are passed by value, not by reference. –  robert Sep 15 '11 at 22:23

So, you can use system(), huh? Behold this masterpiece of engineering:

#include <fstream>

void download_boost() {
    system("wget http://downloads.sourceforge.net/"
           "project/boost/boost/1.47.0/boost_1_47_0.tar.bz2"
           "?r=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.boost.org%2Fusers%2Fhistory%2F"
           "version_1_47_0.html&ts=1316116936&use_mirror=kent"
           " -O boost_1_47_0.tar.bz2");
}

void unpack_boost() {
    system("tar --bzip2 -xf boost_1_47_0.tar.bz2");
}

void write_program() {
    std::ofstream os("blah.cpp");
    os << "#include \"boost/lexical_cast.hpp\"\n"
          "#include <iostream>\n"
          "#include <string>\n"
          "int main() { std::string s; std::cin >> s;"
          "int i = boost::lexical_cast<int>(s);"
          "std::cout >> i; }";
}

void compile_program() {
    system("g++ -Iboost_1_47_0 blah.cpp");
}

void run_program() {
    system("./a.out");
}

int main() {
    download_boost();
    unpack_boost();
    write_program();
    compile_program();
    run_program();
}

(I'm assuming a typical Linux installation with some common tools installed.)

share|improve this answer
1  
Now that's what I call lateral thinking! –  Maxpm Sep 15 '11 at 20:19
2  
Literal thinking. Thinking with literals. –  Cat Plus Plus Sep 15 '11 at 20:20
2  
Cute. But, you used std::ofstream, which is not allowed. –  Robᵩ Sep 15 '11 at 20:26
1  
@Rob: I think the text is ambiguous enough to wonder if it allows the iostream class, the class in the <iostream> header or the classes in the iostream library. But well, it's a joke anyway. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 15 '11 at 20:28
    
If you don't want to use ofstream then you can just echo out your code, and pipe it into G++: echo CODE | g++ -x cpp - (Who needs to do any of this with C++?) –  VolatileStorm Sep 15 '11 at 20:44

stringstreams come closest to what you want to do, although it may seem a little cumbersome at first.

Example:

#include <string>
#include <sstream>

// (...)
std::string str = "12345";
std::istringstream ss(str);
int num;
ss >> num;

As a function (and optimized):

#include <sstream>
#include <string>

int stringToInt(const std::string &str) {
    static std::istringstream ss;
    ss.clear();
    ss.str(str);

    int num;
    ss >> num;

    return num;
}

Here, I am reusing the std::istringstream by applying the static keyword. I have created a very simple benchmark that demonstrates that this is approximately 2 times faster than not reusing: http://pastebin.com/vLSmCyMF

share|improve this answer
    
std::ostringstream("1234") would be enough –  Andy T Sep 15 '11 at 18:39
    
I just added some extra information in bold text to my question. –  AgentRev Sep 15 '11 at 18:49
    
Thanks, Andy. I have adapted the code to demonstrate that stringstreams can be reused, while ostringstreams cannot. It would be interesting to determine if my way of doing it is actually faster. I'm not sure. –  robert Sep 15 '11 at 18:52
2  
@AgentRev: Technically, stringstream is both an iostream and a string class in the standard library. –  Mooing Duck Sep 15 '11 at 19:03
    
Your benchmarks would be more meaningful with -O3 –  SoapBox Sep 15 '11 at 20:00
std::string mystring = "12";

std::ostringstream str(mystring);
int someint;
str >> someint;
share|improve this answer
1  
std::ostream? probably you meant std::ostringstream –  Andy T Sep 15 '11 at 18:38
    
@Andy T: Yes, indeed! Fixed it –  Tony The Lion Sep 15 '11 at 18:39
1  
I'm pretty sure ostringstream doesn't have operator>> (only <<). I think it should be istringstream instead. –  b.buchhold Sep 15 '11 at 18:46
    
I just added some extra information in bold text to my question. –  AgentRev Sep 15 '11 at 18:49
    
Remember to test str.fail() after using operator>>. –  Gabriel Sep 15 '11 at 19:26

Basically, given a std::string mystring that contains only an integer: Start with an int result = 0;.
While mystring has digits
Multiply result by ten
Add biggest digit (first in string)
Remember that the character '0' does not have the value of 0.
Remove the biggest digit from the string

So:
If I have the string "1543", result = 0
we multiply result by ten : result = 0
we add the first digit: result = 1
remove the first digit from the string "543"
we multiply result by ten : result = 10
we add the first digit: result = 15
remove the first digit from the string "43"
we multiply result by ten : result = 150
we add the first digit: result = 154
remove the first digit from the string "3"
we multiply result by ten : result = 1540
we add the first digit: result = 1543
remove the first digit from the string ""
string is empty, so we're done

I wrote code, but then remembered this was a homework problem.

share|improve this answer
    
This is assuming stringstream is not allowed –  Mooing Duck Sep 15 '11 at 19:02

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