Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
    val m = Array(10,20,30,30,50,60,70,80) groupBy ( s => s %30 == 0)
    m(true).map { kv => println(kv) }

prints the values 30, 30, 60

I want the indices i.e. 2, 3, 5 to be printed.

How do I go about this?

share|improve this question
3  
BTW, map { kv => println(kv) } is pretty weird. map is intended to return a new collection and you're evaluating to Unit. What you really want to do here is m(true).foreach(println) –  Derek Wyatt Sep 15 '11 at 18:48
    
Thanks. I'm moving from Java to Scala & its taking a while to absorb the functional paradigm. –  k r Sep 15 '11 at 19:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
val m = Array(10,20,30,30,50,60,70,80).zipWithIndex.groupBy(s =>
  s._1 % 30 == 0).map(e => e._1 -> (e._2.unzip._2))

Just FYI, if you only want the true values, then you could go with @missingfaktor's approach and equally you could partition this:

val m = Array(10, 20, 30, 30, 50, 60, 70, 80).zipWithIndex.partition(s =>
  s._1 % 30 == 0)._1.unzip._2
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! Thanks somuch. You saved me a ton of work. –  k r Sep 15 '11 at 18:53
    
The reason zipWithIndex exists is because what you're trying to do is incredibly common. It's equivalent to something like a.zip(0 until a.size), but zipWithIndex is easier. If this is the right answer please mark it as so. –  Derek Wyatt Sep 15 '11 at 19:03

Here's another way to do it:

Array(10,20,30,30,50,60,70,80).zipWithIndex.filter{ _._1 % 30 == 0 }.map{ _._2 }

I find the .map{ _._2 } easier to comprehend than .unzip._2, but maybe that's just me. What's also interesting is that the above returns:

Array[Int] = Array(2, 3, 5)

While the unzip variant returns this:

scala.collection.mutable.IndexedSeq[Int] = ArrayBuffer(2, 3, 5)
share|improve this answer
1  
collect is just a combination of filter and map, though in this case it makes you type slightly more. :-) –  missingfaktor Sep 15 '11 at 23:13
    
I like the collect solution too, because it explicitly names element and index instead of using the slightly ugly _1 and _2. –  robinst Sep 16 '11 at 8:21

Here's a more direct way,

val m = Array(10,20,30,30,50,60,70,80).zipWithIndex.filter(_._1 % 30 == 0).unzip

obtains the values and indices as a pair, (ArrayBuffer(30, 30, 60),ArrayBuffer(2, 3, 5)) You can print just the indices with

m._2.foreach(println _)
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah this one works too...I really want the indices and not the values, so I'll stick with Derek's _._2 which does the trick –  k r Sep 15 '11 at 19:26
scala> Array(10, 20, 30, 30, 50, 60, 70, 80).zipWithIndex.collect {
     |   case (element, index) if element % 30 == 0 => index
     | }
res119: Array[Int] = Array(2, 3, 5)

scala> res119 foreach println
2
3
5
share|improve this answer
    
Uh...Nope. Derek had the right solution Your code assumes I know beforehand that (2,3,7) is the solution set of indices for the groupBy...which I obviously don't. –  k r Sep 15 '11 at 18:57
    
@Krishnan: Check the edit. –  missingfaktor Sep 15 '11 at 19:09
    
@missingfaktor Now it's missing the groupBy - you should be getting back a Map at the end. :) –  Derek Wyatt Sep 15 '11 at 19:12
    
@Derek: Why groupBy and why Map? He is obviously using the wrong HOFs for the wrong purposes. –  missingfaktor Sep 15 '11 at 19:13
    
@missingfaktor We shouldn't get into a big discussion here, but I think you're assuming he only wants the true values and there's no concrete indication of that. I assumed he wants both true and false. My point being that if your assumption's incorrect then it doesn't solve the problem, and if mine's incorrect then you could certainly argue I've written too much "stuff". –  Derek Wyatt Sep 15 '11 at 19:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.