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I have the code below that will open a modal window. This works in IE 8 but not in Chrome or FF. I am new to the world of cross browser functionality.

function ShowModal(WindowID,FramesetID)
{
    window.onscroll = function () { window.top.document.getElementById(WindowID).style.top = window.top.document.body.scrollTop; };
    window.top.document.getElementById(WindowID).style.display = "block";
    window.top.document.getElementById(WindowID).style.top = document.body.scrollTop;

    widthv=parseInt(parseInt(screen.width)/1.50);
    heightv=parseInt(parseInt(screen.height)/1.50); 

    window.top.document.getElementById(FramesetID).style.width=widthv;
    window.top.document.getElementById(FramesetID).style.height=heightv;
}

Can anyone help in making this code Chrome & FF compatible?
I tried changing window.top to window.parent but no luck Also, any rules to keep in mind when coding for multiple browsers (I have browsed through but didn't quite find any set of rules for cross browser compatibility)?

Update:
The issue is that in IE, this modal window appears in approximately half the screensize. In FF and Chrome, the modal window appears about the size of a dollar coin.

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1  
have you considered using something like jquery to take the pain out of cross browser functionality? –  chrispanda Sep 15 '11 at 18:49
    
@DotNetRookie: You would get more help if you could post the actual error messages. Both Chrome and Firefox have a "JavaScript console" view that shows error and warning messages from JavaScript code. –  Daniel Pryden Sep 15 '11 at 19:47
1  
@Daniel, there is not error message technically. The modal winodw appears significantly smaller than is designed to be (in FF and Chrome). –  DotNetRookie Sep 15 '11 at 20:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd recommend jQuery like chrispanda has suggested. jQuery has a built in scroll event and the rest can be written in just a few lines to manipulate the html / css.

http://api.jquery.com/

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Depending on your browser's current rendering mode, you may need to use document.documentElement.scrollTop instead of document.body.scrollTop (and likewise for scrollLeft).

There's some good background on this problem in an Evolt article by Peter-Paul Koch (of quirksmode.org fame), but it's from 2002 and is a bit dated now.

As others here are suggesting, the easiest way to solve this kind of problem in 2011 is to just use an existing JavaScript framework. jQuery is quite popular (especially among StackOverflow users), but there are many others as well.

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Another solution:

(document.documentElement.scrollTop||document.body.scrollTop)

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1  
Works perfectly. Thanks a lot! –  Volker Mauel Oct 16 '13 at 17:02

you can use:

window.pageYOffset

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1  
zsimo, Maybe you can elaborate what this does and where the OP can find reference on this. That would raise the quality of your answer. –  Fildor Jan 14 at 14:13
1  
sure: I do not think it is necessary to use jQuery for the problem with Firefox the returns 0 with document.body.scrollTop Simply use window.pageYOffset to get the distance from the top when the page scrolls: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Window.scrollY Simone –  zsimo Jan 15 at 14:55
    
Worked for me. Chrome, IE9, Firefox. Thanks @zsimo! –  bahoo Feb 28 at 21:41

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