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I have a class called IAckHandler

class IAckHandler {
public:
    virtual ~IAckHandler();

    virtual void handleAck(long messageType, bool ackrcvd, uint8_t ackByte) = 0;
private:

};

The intended use is for other classes to inherit, so this is basically a "interface" class.

I am using message queues to submit requests to a polling thread(uart comm) and want to pass in an IAckHandler into the message queue message. The struct is like so:

struct reqmsg
    {
        long int mtype;
        void (*reqHandler)(MasterRadioComm*, uint8_t*);
        IAckHandler* ackHandler;
        unsigned char mtext[NUM_INDICES];
    };

Here is the function to submit to message queue

void Uartcom::req_doSomething(IAckHandler& ackHandler)
{
    struct reqmsg req;
    if(ackHandler == NULL) req.ackHandler = this;
    else req.ackHandler = ackHandler;
    msgsnd(m_msgQueueKey, &req, sizeof(struct reqmsg) - sizeof(long), 0);
}

But when I pass in a reference to an IAckHandler, I get cannot convert ‘IAckHandler’ to ‘IAckHandler*’ in assignment.

Can I call req_doSomething(this) from another class that inherits IAckHandler?

share|improve this question
    
You don't need to say struct in C++. reqmsg req; and sizeof(reqmsg) do just fine. –  Kerrek SB Sep 15 '11 at 19:37
    
guess im stuck in C land. –  user623879 Sep 17 '11 at 2:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You seem to be lacking some basic pointers and references knowledge. For the req_doSomething given in the example, &ref will give you a pointer to the referred object so it should be

else req.ackHandler = &ackHandler;

and to get a reference from a pointer, you derreference it with *ptr so the call would be

req_doSomething(*this);

...or just drop the reference and work entirely with pointers.

Update: As others have pointed out, a reference cannot be NULL.

share|improve this answer
    
ah ok..so "this" is a pointer, not a reference type. When I use "this" do I need to do this-> or this.? –  user623879 Sep 15 '11 at 19:38
    
@user623879: You need to use this-> –  GWW Sep 15 '11 at 19:39
    
Since we are talking reference type here, the comparision is between the special literal 0 and an object of type IAckHandler&. Assuming that it is another mistake and if(&ackHandler == NULL) was the original intention, it has to be noted, that &ackHandler can indeed compare equal to 0! Take the example function void test(int& a) { cout << &a << endl; } and call it like this: test(*(int*)0). –  gha.st Sep 15 '11 at 19:58
    
If IAckHandler were comparable with 0, then the comparison would be well formed. Given the definition of IAckHandler, such comparison is not included, and while it could be make valid by 3rd types or conversions I assume the OP has confused references with pointers. Passing *(int*)0 to a type expecting a reference to int is actually not allowed by the standard. –  K-ballo Sep 15 '11 at 20:02
    
null references may not be allowed by the standard, but at all compilers i have tested above program fragment with, compile and run it perfectly fine. –  gha.st Sep 15 '11 at 20:09

Change your function declaration to take the argument as a pointer rather than a reference:

void Uartcom::req_doSomething(IAckHandler * ackHandler)
                                         ^^^
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You have a few issues with your req_doSomething function:

  1. ackHandler is a reference which cannot be NULL.
  2. You are trying to assign a reference to a pointer (req.ackHandler = &ackHandler; is what you want).

However, it's probably a better idea to do something like this:

void Uartcom::req_doSomething(IAckHandler * ackHandler)
{
    struct reqmsg req;
    if(ackHandler == NULL) req.ackHandler = this;
    else req.ackHandler = ackHandler;
    msgsnd(m_msgQueueKey, &req, sizeof(struct reqmsg) - sizeof(long), 0);
}
share|improve this answer

It describes exactly what you should do.

just past the object's address to the pointer:

req.ackHandler = &ackHandler;
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Look carefully. The member in the struct is an "IAckHandler*" while the arg received in the setter function in a reference to IAckHandler. What you may want to do is:

req.ackHandler = &ackHandler;

regards,

Yati Sagade

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It looks as if you must have declared ackHandler as an IAckHandler* in struct reqmsg. In C++, reference types (like IAckHandler&), although implemented using pointers, are treated syntactically as if they were embedded objects - basically you need to work with an IAckHandler& as if it were an IAckHandler, not an IAckHandler*.

Therefore, you should be able to fix your code like this:

void Uartcom::req_doSomething(IAckHandler& ackHandler)
{
    struct reqmsg req;
    if(ackHandler == NULL) req.ackHandler = this;
    else req.ackHandler = &ackHandler;
    msgsnd(m_msgQueueKey, &req, sizeof(struct reqmsg) - sizeof(long), 0);
}
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