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The code below uses Javascript to create a base class, eventRaiser, that has the internals needed to allow clients to subscribe to events, and subclasses to raise these events. The idea is that other classes, like ThingWithEvent, will inherit from eventRaiser and expose the subscribe method, and fire off the raise method internally. The jQuery init function demonstrates this.

The way this is written, there's nothing stopping a client from directly raising an event. In other words, adding er.raise("Y"); to the jQuery init function causes the Y event to be raised without difficulty.

Ideally I'd like to make it so that outside code, interacting with eventRaiser through some class that inherits from it, with can only subscribe to events, and not raise them.

In other words I'd like raise to be the equivalent of C# protected—visible only to itself, and classes that inherit from it.

Is there some slick ninja closure I should use to achieve this, or should I recognize that Javascript is not meant to incorporate OO Encapulation, rename raise to _raise to imply to client code that _raise is private and should not be invoked, and move on?

    $(function() {
        var er = new ThingWithEvent();

        er.subscribe("X", function() { alert("Hello"); });
        er.subscribe("X", function() { alert("World"); });
        er.subscribe("Y", function() { alert("Not Called"); });

        er.doSomething("X");
    });

    function eventRaiser() {
        var events = {};
        this.subscribe = function(key, func) {
            if (!events[key])
                events[key] = { name: key, funcs: [] };
            events[key].funcs.push(func);
        };

        this.raise = function(key) {
            if (!events[key]) return;
            for (var i = 0; i < events[key].funcs.length; i++)
                events[key].funcs[i]();
        };
    }

    function ThingWithEvent() {
        eventRaiser.call(this);
        var self = this;

        this.doSomething = function() {
            alert("doing something");
            self.raise("X");
        }
    }

    function surrogate() { }
    surrogate.prototype = eventRaiser;
    ThingWithEvent.prototype = new surrogate();
    ThingWithEvent.prototype.constructor = ThingWithEvent;
share|improve this question
1  
What would be raising the events then and how? –  Joe Sep 15 '11 at 19:40
    
@IAbstract - the idea is that classes that inherit from eventRaiser would be able to call raise, and not outside code –  Adam Rackis Sep 15 '11 at 19:47
    
@Adam eventRaiser is not a class, because you're not calling it as a constructor. –  Šime Vidas Sep 15 '11 at 19:51
    
@Sime I'm calling ThingWithEvent as a constructor, and that inherits from eventRaiser. I'm just wanting to know if it's a) possible and b) advisable to make raise be only visible to itself, and classes that inherit from it –  Adam Rackis Sep 15 '11 at 19:57
1  
From my experience, you are better off documenting your code and interfaces properly than trying to enforce a behaviour the language was not designed for. Yes, there might be ways to achieve what you want, but they are hacks and probably make your code more difficult to understand. –  Felix Kling Sep 17 '11 at 21:24

5 Answers 5

Read this: http://javascript.crockford.com/private.html

There are no classes in javascript, so you can make constructor for event manager with this.subscribe(obj) as a method for subscribing, and var raise(event) as a private method for rising them, which can only be called by instances of it..

function EventRaiser () {
     var foo = 1;  // will be private
     function raise() {  ...  }; // will be private
     var raise1 = function () {  ...  }; // will be private

     this.subscribe = function () {  ...  }; // will be privileged, has access to private vars and methods
     this.foo = 1; // public, anyone can read/write

     return this; 
}
var er = new EventRaiser (); // here we make instance of constructor
er.subscribe(); // will work
er.raise(); // will THROW error, because it is 'private'  

Local function raise(event) will only be visible to instances of eventRaiser, and not to instances of derived constructors. (But they will have their own private raise function, inaccessible to anyone else).

share|improve this answer
    
I just made my question a bit clearer. Reading the article I don't think using privileged functions will do what I need –  Adam Rackis Sep 15 '11 at 20:03
    
There are no classes in javascript, so you can make constructor for event manager with this.subscribe(obj) as a method for subscribing, and var raise(event) as a private method for rising them, which can only be called by instances of it.. –  c69 Sep 15 '11 at 20:19
1  
Ok, if you can put that in your answer I'll upvote (and accept after a bit more time). Just please stress that a local function raise(event) will only be visible to instances of eventRaiser, and not instances of derived classes, since that was the original thrust of the question –  Adam Rackis Sep 15 '11 at 20:31

Consider:

function ThingWithEvent() {
    var thing = {},
        events = {};

    function raise( key ) {
        if ( !events[ key ] ) { return; }
        for ( var i = 0; i < events[ key ].funcs.length; i++ )
            events[ key ].funcs[ i ]();
    }

    thing.subscribe = function ( key, func ) {
        if ( !events[ key ] ) {
            events[ key ] = { name: key, funcs: [] };
        }
        events[ key ].funcs.push( func );
    };

    thing.doSomething = function () {
        alert( "doing something" );
        raise( "X" );
    };

    return thing;
}

So, each instance of ThingWithEvent will get it's own events object (which is a private member of the instance because it's a local variable of the constructor).

raise is a nested function inside the constructor which makes it a private method of the instance.

this.subscribe and this.doSomething are "privileged" methods of the instance. They and only they can access the private members and private methods of the instance.

Btw, I defined a explicit thing object which represents the new instance. I do this instead of just using this (which represents the new instance by default), because it enables me to identify the new instance uniquely inside the constructor even in nested functions - no var self = this; hack necessary.


Update:
This would be inheritance:

function Thing() {
    var thing = Object.create( new EventTarget );

    thing.doSomething = function () {
        alert( "doing something" );
        this.raise( "X" );
    };

    return thing;
}

function EventTarget() {
    var events = {};

    this.raise = function ( key ) {
        if ( !events[ key ] ) { return; }
        for ( var i = 0; i < events[ key ].funcs.length; i++ )
            events[ key ].funcs[ i ]();
    }

    this.subscribe = function ( key, func ) {
        if ( !events[ key ] ) {
            events[ key ] = { name: key, funcs: [] };
        }
        events[ key ].funcs.push( func );
    };
}

Usage:

var thing = new Thing();
thing.subscribe( ... );
thing.doSomething( ... );
share|improve this answer
    
That just removed the inheritance from my original example. I was wanting the subscribe and raise methods to be in my base class, eventRaiser. The code I wrote caused ThingWithEvent to inherit from eventRaiser. I was just asking if Javascript had a way to make the raise method visible to classes that inherit from it, but not anyone else—the equivalent of protected in C# –  Adam Rackis Sep 15 '11 at 19:54
    
@Adam But there is no inheritance in your code. eventRaiser is not a constructor - it's just an utility function which adds methods to the instances of ThingWithEvent. I've updated my answer with an example for inheritance. –  Šime Vidas Sep 15 '11 at 22:05
    
What you have is also inheritance, but won't the constructor property be incorrectly set in your example? The Thing ctor will return an object with EventTaregt as the constructor instead of Thing. The code posted at the very bottom of the question—you may have to scroll—is based on the example here stackoverflow.com/questions/7436463/… –  Adam Rackis Sep 15 '11 at 22:24
    
@Adam Yes, you're right, it wasn't inheritance. My mistake. I've updated my example with this line: var thing = Object.create( new EventTarget );. Now it is inheritance. –  Šime Vidas Sep 15 '11 at 22:26
    
In any event, the way this is written, raise is still directly available on the Thing object you create—whoever creates thing can call raise on it. Making raise private makes it unavailable even within functions on Thing. It looks like making a C# protected function is just not possible in Javascript –  Adam Rackis Sep 15 '11 at 22:29

You can get closer to what you want by returning an object with a limited interface:

function EventSource() {
  var events = {};
  var self = this;
  this.subscribe = function(key, func) {
    if (!events[key])
      events[key] = { name: key, funcs: [] };
    events[key].funcs.push(func);
  };

  this.raise = function(key) {
    if (!events[key]) return;
    for (var i = 0; i < events[key].funcs.length; i++)
      events[key].funcs[i]();
  };

  this.limited = function() {
    return {
      subscribe: function(k, f) { return self.subscribe(k,f);}
    };
  };
}

Then you can call .limited() on an EventSource and get a limited-access object that you can call .subscribe() on, but not .raise(). If you can control where these are instantiated, say, with a factory, you can limit the damage.

jQuery uses this pattern with its Deferred objects; The limited objects are called promises, and are created with .promise().

share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I hate answering my own question, let alone accepting my own answer, but it turns out this is not only possible, but insanely easy. The idea behind this code comes from Douglas Crockford's JavaScript The Good Parts. The trick is to ditch constructors (neoclassical inheritance) altogether and use functional inheritance.

This code not only achieves public, protected, and private access levels, but it's much cleaner, and easier to read IMO than inheriting constructors and swapping prototypes and constructors around. The only catch is that this code will be slightly slower since each object creation necessitates the creation of each of the object's functions, instead of getting all that dumped in for free with a constructor's prototype. So, if you need to create tens of thousands of objects in your web site then you might prefer a constructor. For...everyone else, this code is likely for you.

    function eventRaiser(protectedStuff) {
        protectedStuff = protectedStuff || {}; 
        var that = {};
        var events = {};  //private

        protectedStuff.raise = function(key) {
            if (!events[key]) return;
                for (var i = 0; i < events[key].funcs.length; i++)
                    events[key].funcs[i].apply(null, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
        };

        that.subscribe = function(key, func) {
            if (!events[key])
                events[key] = { name: key, funcs: [] };
            events[key].funcs.push(func);
        };

        return that;
    }        

    function widget() {
        var protectedStuff = {};
        var that = eventRaiser(protectedStuff);

        that.doSomething = function() { 
            alert("doing something"); 
            protectedStuff.raise("doStuffEvent");
        };

        return that;
    }

    $(function() {
        var w = widget();
        w.subscribe("doStuffEvent", function(){ alert("I've been raised"); });
        w.doSomething();

        w.protectedStuff.raise("doStuffEvent"); //error!!!!!  raise is protected
        w.raise("doStuffEvent"); //and this obviously won't work
    });
share|improve this answer

Inspired by Adam's answer (just what I was looking for!) I whipped this together to give protected methods with constructors / neoclassical inheritance.

IT IS COMPLETELY UNTESTED and may be wrong, but I thought I'd throw it out there.

It uses the idea of "protectedStuff" from Adam's answer to allow two-way non-public communication between the base class and derived class.

/*** Example Base Class ***/

var Example = {};

Example.BaseClass = function(shared)
{
    // Private Variables

    var protected = shared; // protected is the two-way communication mechanism between the base and derived class

    var internal = 0;

    // Protected Variables and Methods

    protected.internalStuff = function()
    {

    }

    // Public Variables and Methods

    this.public = 123;

    this.show = function(arg)
    {
        protected.onBeforeShow();

        privateMethod(arg);

        protected.onAfterShow();

        doSomeMoreStuff();
    };

    // Private Methods

    function privateMethod(arg)
    {
        internal = arg;
    }
};

/*** Example Derived Class ***/

Example.DerivedClass = function(parameter)
{
    var protected = (
    {
        onBeforeShow : function()
        {
            // ...
        },

        onAfterShow : function()
        {
            // ...
        }
    });

    // Call our base class' constructor

    Example.BaseClass.call(this, protected);    // Tells base class about our protected methods, adds its protected methods to the 'protected' variable.

    // At this point our instance has all the public methods and properties of the base class.

    // Public Methods that our derived class overrides

    var baseShow = this.show;  // Save the base class' implementation of the show method

    this.show = function(arg)
    {
        baseShow.call(this, arg);  // Call the base class' implementation

        // ..
    }

    // Public Variables and Methods Unique to This Class

    this.derivedVariable = 123;

    this.derivedMethod = function()
    {
        protected.internalStuff();
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
That might work - I'd have to test it though to be sure. Also, I think you're supposed to set derivedClass's prototype to base's, and then re-set the constructor for neoclassical inheritance. –  Adam Rackis Oct 10 '11 at 20:39
    
Yeah, I didn't do anything with the prototype. In this case I only had one public method in the base class, which I also have in the derived class. If you had a bunch of public methods in the base class that you wanted to show up in the derived class, you would have to do some more work here. –  Tom Winter Oct 11 '11 at 14:23

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