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Can someone tell me why one of these DoCalculation Methods is much faster than the other (like 40% faster)?

I have the main thread that waits for the ManualResetEvents to be set:

private void LayoutRoot_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((obj) =>
{
    ManualResetEvent[] finishcalc = new ManualResetEvent[] 
    { 
        new ManualResetEvent(false), 
        new ManualResetEvent(false), 
        new ManualResetEvent(false), 
        new ManualResetEvent(false), 
        new ManualResetEvent(false), 
        new ManualResetEvent(false) 
    };
    TimeSpan time1 = new TimeSpan(DateTime.Now.Ticks);
    DoCalculation(rand.Next(10), rand.Next(10), 1, finishcalc[0]);
    DoCalculation(rand.Next(10), rand.Next(10), 2, finishcalc[1]);
    DoCalculation(rand.Next(10), rand.Next(10), 3, finishcalc[2]);
    DoCalculation(rand.Next(10), rand.Next(10), 4, finishcalc[3]);
    DoCalculation(rand.Next(10), rand.Next(10), 5, finishcalc[4]);
    DoCalculation(rand.Next(10), rand.Next(10), 6, finishcalc[5]);

    if (WaitHandle.WaitAll(finishcalc))
    {            
        TimeSpan time2 =new TimeSpan(DateTime.Now.Ticks);
        AddTextAsync(string.Format("DoCalculation Finish in {0}\n" ,(time2-time1).TotalSeconds));
    }
});
}

Then I have a Method that create another thread to do some calculations sequentially, this is, I need the result from the previous thread to continue with the following one.I found two ways to do it, this is for Silverlight.

In the first example I'm creating a new thread and it waits for every consecutive calculation to finish before continue:

void DoCalculation(int number1, int number2, int callid, ManualResetEvent calcdone)
{
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((obj0) =>
    {
        AddTextAsync(string.Format("The values for Callid {0} are {1} and {2}\n", callid, number1, number2));
        int result = 0;
        ManualResetEvent mresetevent = new ManualResetEvent(false);
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((obj) =>
        {
            result = number1 + number2;
            mresetevent.Set();
        });
        mresetevent.WaitOne();
        mresetevent.Reset();
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((obj2) =>
        {
            result *= result;
            mresetevent.Set();
        });
        mresetevent.WaitOne();
        mresetevent.Reset();

        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((obj2) =>
        {
            result *= 2;
            mresetevent.Set();
        });
        mresetevent.WaitOne();
        AddTextAsync(string.Format("The result for Callid {0} is {1} \n", callid, result));
        calcdone.Set();
    });
}

The second example of DoCalculation I use a class as link to pass an Action as parameter to the ThreadPool and use it as callback to create a second and third thread in a chain:

The link class:

public class CalcParams
{
    public int CallID;
    public ManualResetEvent ManualReset;
    public int Result;
    public Action<int, ManualResetEvent, int> CallbackDone;
}

example of a Async service::

public static void DownloadDataInBackground(CalcParams calcparams)
{
    WebClient client = new WebClient();
    Uri uri = new Uri("http://www.google.com");
    client.DownloadStringCompleted += (s, e) =>
    {
        CalcParams localparams = (CalcParams)e.UserState;
        localparams.CallbackDone(e.Result.Length + localparams.Result, localparams.ManualReset, localparams.CallID);
    };
    client.DownloadStringAsync(uri, calcparams);
}

And the improved doCalculation Method:

void DoCalculation(int number1, int number2, int callid, ManualResetEvent calcdone)
{
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((obj0) =>
    {
        int result = number1+number2;
        doCalculationService.DownloadDataInBackground(new CalcParams()
        {
            Result = result,
            ManualReset = calcdone,
            CallID = callid,
            CallbackDone = (r, m, i) =>
            {
                int sqrt = r * r;
                doCalculationService.DownloadDataInBackground(new CalcParams()
                {
                    Result = sqrt,
                    CallID = i,
                    ManualReset = m,
                    CallbackDone = (r2, m2, i2) =>
                    {
                        int result2 = r2 * 2;
                        AddTextAsync(string.Format("The result for Callid {0} is {1} \n", i2, result2));
                        m2.Set();
                    }
                });
            }
        });
    });
}

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Can you use StopWatch to measure time, just for interest, whether results the same? Also can you share please code of the AddTextAsync perhaps there is bottleneck? –  sll Sep 15 '11 at 20:18
    
I believe stopwatch is not available in Silverlight.. I could test the same in other platforms but right now I'm interested in silverlight only. And there is way too much time difference between the two methods even removing the extra calls and I don't understand why... –  montelof Sep 15 '11 at 21:31
    
I take it that this is example code, there's a lot of QueueUserWorkItem's in there. In fact, the housekeeping cost far exceeds the amount of work you're doing. –  Skizz Sep 15 '11 at 21:57
1  
Your new example is even more confusing. You're calling ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem to run a background job that just queues another thread to download in the background, that then chains to another, similar, construct. In all, you create 5 threads when you really only need one, since your jobs are executed sequentially. What you have is no different than a single QueueUserWorkItem that contains two calls to DownloadString, and one calculation, executed sequentially. –  Jim Mischel Sep 16 '11 at 17:12
1  
The basic idea of posting a question is to provide the smallest amount of code to demontrate the issue. Not to dump all variations and trials on the reader. –  Henk Holterman Sep 16 '11 at 18:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Can I suggest that you look at the Reactive Extensions (Rx) as an alternative way to use multi-threading in Silverlight?

Here's your code done in Rx:

Func<int, int, int> calculation = (n1, n2) =>
{
    var r = n1 + n2;
    r *= r;
    r *= 2;
    return r;
};

var query =
    from callid in Observable.Range(0, 6, Scheduler.ThreadPool)
    let n1 = rand.Next(10)
    let n2 = rand.Next(10)
    from result in Observable.Start(() => calculation(n1, n2))
    select new { callid, n1, n2, result };

query.Subscribe(x => { /* do something with result */ });

It pushes the calculation out onto the thread-pool automatically - I put the Scheduler.ThreadPool parameter in, but it's the default for a SelectMany query.

With this kind of code you generally don't worry about all of the MREs and get very easy to read code that can be tested more easily.

Rx is a supported Microsoft product and runs on the desktop CLR as well as Silverlight.

Here are the links for Rx:

Oh, and I think that the reason you're getting very different performance results is that Silverlight only has millisecond resolution for timing so you're really going to have to run the calculations thousands of times to get a good average.


EDIT: As per the request in the comments, here is an example of chaining the results of each intermediate calculation using Rx.

Func<int, int, int> fn1 = (n1, n2) => n1 + n2;
Func<int, int> fn2 = n => n * n;
Func<int, int> fn3 = n => 2 * n;

var query =
    from callid in Observable.Range(0, 6, Scheduler.ThreadPool)
    let n1 = rand.Next(10)
    let n2 = rand.Next(10)
    from r1 in Observable.Start(() => fn1(n1, n2))
    from r2 in Observable.Start(() => fn2(r1))
    from r3 in Observable.Start(() => fn3(r2))
    select new { callid, n1, n2, r1, r2, r3 };

Of course the three lambda functions can easily be regular method functions instead.

A further alternative, if you have functions that use the BeginInvoke/EndInvoke async pattern is to use the FromAsyncPattern extension method like this:

Func<int, int, IObservable<int>> ofn1 =
    Observable.FromAsyncPattern<int, int, int>
        (fn1.BeginInvoke, fn1.EndInvoke);

Func<int, IObservable<int>> ofn2 =
    Observable.FromAsyncPattern<int, int>
        (fn2.BeginInvoke, fn2.EndInvoke);

Func<int, IObservable<int>> ofn3 =
    Observable.FromAsyncPattern<int, int>
        (fn3.BeginInvoke, fn3.EndInvoke);

var query =
    from callid in Observable.Range(0, 6, Scheduler.ThreadPool)
    let n1 = rand.Next(10)
    let n2 = rand.Next(10)
    from r1 in ofn1(n1, n2)
    from r2 in ofn2(r1)
    from r3 in ofn3(r2)
    select new { callid, n1, n2, r1, r2, r3 };

A little bit messier up front but the query is a little bit simpler.

NB: Again the Scheduler.ThreadPool parameter is unnecessary, but just included to explicitly show that the query executes using the thread-pool.

share|improve this answer
    
I was considering using RX when i started the project I'm working 3 months ago and I didn't know RX was available for silverlight by that time, before ask you again, I have tried to find out how to chain the 3 operations of each thread, and I could not find any example, could you please extend yours? imagine that each of the 3 operations is executed Asynch, and you need the result from the previous operation to execute the following one. thanks. –  montelof Sep 20 '11 at 18:47
    
@montelof - It's easy to chain operations together with Rx. I'll edit my solution with an example as requested. :-) –  Enigmativity Sep 21 '11 at 0:00

There's no good reason to call ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem and then immediately wait for it to finish. That is, writing this:

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(() =>
    {
        // do stuff
        mevent.Set();
    });
mevent.WaitOne();

Doesn't give you any benefit. Your main thread ends up waiting. In fact, it's worse than just writing:

// do stuff

Because the thread pool has to spin up a thread.

You can simplify and speed up your first DoCalculation method by removing all the nested "asynchronous" work:

void DoCalculation(int number1, int number2, int callid, ManualResetEvent calcdone)
{
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((obj0) =>
    {
        AddTextAsync(string.Format("The values for Callid {0} are {1} and {2}\n", callid, number1, number2));
        int result = 0;

        result = number1 + number2;
        result *= result;
        result *= 2;

        AddTextAsync(string.Format("The result for Callid {0} is {1} \n", callid, result));
        calcdone.Set();
    });
}

Edit in response to updated question

Your new example #3 simplifies things to some extent, but still misses the point. Here's what happens when your new DoCalculation method executes:

  1. ThreadQueue.QueueUserWorkItem creates a new thread and the DoCalculation method exits. You now have a background thread running. We'll call this Thread 1.
  2. The code calls DownloadDataInBackground. That method starts another thread to download the data asynchronously. Call that Thread 2.
  3. Thread 1 exits.
  4. When Thread 2 completes the download, it calls the completion callback, which again calls DownloadDataInBackground. That creates Thread 3, starts executing, and Thread 2 exits.
  5. When Thread 3 completes the download, it calls the completion callback, does the calculation, outputs some data, and exits.

So you started up three threads. At no time was there any meaningful "multithreading" going on. That is, at no time was there more than one thread doing meaningful work.

Your tasks are being performed sequentially, so there's no reason to start multiple threads for them to run.

Your code would be much cleaner and would execute somewhat faster (due to not having to start so many threads) if you just wrote:

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((obj0) =>
{
    DownloadString(...); // NOT DownloadStringAsync
    DownloadString(...);
    // Do calculation
});

One thread performs each task in sequence.

The only time you need multiple threads is if you want multiple tasks to execute at the same time. Clearly, that's not what you're doing. In fact, your question says:

Then I have a Method that create another thread to do some calculations sequentially, this is, I need the result from the previous thread to continue with the following one.

Sequential tasks means one thread.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your answer, but maybe I was not clear enough, this is an example where each calculation represents an Asyncronomous call to a webservice, or a time consuming task that we dont want to make the main thread to wait for it before continuing with the other threads. –  montelof Sep 15 '11 at 22:32
    
In my case im using an OOB application that has network communication with a server by sockets, the socketclient im using accepts an Action<ManualResetEvent,...> as parameter, so I can Set the Calling thread from the callback Method and also I pass other parameters like the caller ID, server response, etc, so I can use these values to pass them as parameter to the following thread.The whole Idea here is how the performance change based on how you chain your calls the the Asynchronous services. –  montelof Sep 15 '11 at 23:02
    
I guess I still don't understand. If each of your asynchronous calls depends on the values returned by the previous calls (i.e. you're chaining, as in your examples), then you can wrap the whole thing into a single asynchronous block as I showed. Neither of your examples shows the DoCalculation method performing concurrent asynchronous tasks, so there's no need for the complicated chaining that you propose. If your real application's DoCalculation method does perform concurrent asynchronous tasks, you should change your examples to show that. –  Jim Mischel Sep 16 '11 at 2:19
    
I have updated the second example to show how to call an Async service from the chain, hope this makes more sense. –  montelof Sep 16 '11 at 16:58
    
@user188711: See my updated response. –  Jim Mischel Sep 16 '11 at 19:32

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