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It happens sometimes, how do i get to know when my stored procedure dropped/removed without my knowledge?

It annoys me whenever I debugs and found to know that the stored procedure doesn't exits, which created and tested some days ago.

Is there a way to know the removed Stored Procedures in MS SQL Server?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The standard way to check if procedure exists is

if exists(
    SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES
    WHERE routine_type = N'PROCEDURE' and routine_name = @procname)
  print 'exists'

Starting with MSSQL 2005 you can use DDL trigger to send email notification when procedure is dropped or created:

USE msdb
GO
CREATE TABLE ddl_log
(ID int idenity(1,1) PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED,
 PostTime datetime,
 DB_User nvarchar(100),
 Event nvarchar(100),
 TSQL nvarchar(2000));

CREATE TRIGGER DDL_Notify
ON DATABASE
FOR DROP_PROCEDURE, CREATE_PROCEDURE
AS
DECLARE @data XML,
        @tableHTML  NVARCHAR(MAX) ;

SET @data = EVENTDATA()

INSERT msdb.dbo.ddl_log (PostTime, DB_User, Event, TSQL)
VALUES (GETDATE(), CONVERT(nvarchar(100), USER_NAME()),
   @data.value('(/EVENT_INSTANCE/EventType)[1]', 'nvarchar(100)'),
   @data.value('(/EVENT_INSTANCE/TSQLCommand)[1]', 'nvarchar(2000)') ) ;

SET @tableHTML =
    N'<H1>DDL Table Event</H1>' +
    N'<table border="1">' +
    N'<tr><th>Post Time</th><th>User</th>' +
    N'<th>TSQL</th><th></tr>' +
    CAST ( ( SELECT td = PostTime, '',
                    td = DB_User, '',
                    td = TSQL, ''
              FROM msdb.dbo.ddl_log
              WHERE id = (select max(id) from msdb.dbo.ddl_log)
              FOR XML PATH('tr'), TYPE
    ) AS NVARCHAR(MAX) ) +
    N'</table>';

EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_send_dbmail
    @profile_name = 'Default',
    @recipients = 'dba@youraddress.com',
    @subject = 'DDL Table Event',
    @body = @tableHTML,
    @body_format = 'HTML'
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+1 nifty, I like it :) –  Christopher Klein Apr 13 '09 at 12:34
    
+1 preference to "INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES" over old "sysobjects" –  Sung Apr 14 '09 at 3:38
    
That's a nice Big-Brother and "Who's been messin' with my database" auditor. Well played!! –  granadaCoder Dec 15 '10 at 16:43

If you want to be more or less database-vendor independent, you can use the SQL Standard catalog views called INFORMATION_SCHEMA - they're implemented in SQL Server, MySQL and many other system:

select * from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES
where ROUTINE_NAME = 'YourStoredProcName'

If you get back a row, the stored proc is still in the system - if not, it's gone.

Marc

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Beat me by a few seconds on INFORMATION_SCHEMA :) +1 –  Constantin Apr 13 '09 at 12:32
if not exists(select * from sysobjects where type='P' and name= @procedure_name)
   print 'does not exist'
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The above answers are correct, but I never understand why seasoned dba's don't include the schema name. Below shows SCHEMA and case sensitive corrections.

IF NOT EXISTS 
    (
    SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES
    WHERE ROUTINE_TYPE = N'PROCEDURE' and ROUTINE_SCHEMA = N'dbo' and ROUTINE_NAME = N'uspMyProcedure'  
    )
BEGIN
    print 'Does not exist'
END

..

Schemas Discussion on Microsoft.com

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd283095%28v=sql.100%29.aspx

..

As far as best practices on "if exists" ... I would also go through Andy Leonard's 5 part series (and growing) on Test-Driven development with TSQL.

http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Testing/66553/

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Quick and dirty way would be to do:

sp_helptext proc_name

If the function complains then the stored procedure is missing.

If you want to find out programmatically then perform a query on the sysobjects table.

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If you really want to know "when" your procedure is removed, look up DDL triggers (SQL 2005 and up).

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